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jedzep

Amber Color Tone Ain't There!

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Hey 'guys'.

Being a vintage geek, I've always loved the yellowing that occurs over time on natural spruce tops. My 1950 J50 doesn't budge though, from it's whiter 'ashy' tone, though it hangs in a indirect sunlit room with all the other ambers, that get deeper golden with time.
 

I'd love to hear theories on why it retains it's pale tone under the satin finish.

 

100_0709.JPG

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4 hours ago, jedzep said:

Hey 'guys'.

Being a vintage geek, I've always loved the yellowing that occurs over time on natural spruce tops. My 1950 J50 doesn't budge though, from it's whiter 'ashy' tone, though it hangs in a indirect sunlit room with all the other ambers, that get deeper golden with time.
 

I'd love to hear theories on why it retains it's pale tone under the satin finish.

 

100_0709.JPG

Do you think that's the original finish?

You say it's satin, and it originally would have been gloss, so that may be a re-finish, or at least an overcoat. If it is, and it's poly rather than nitro, it isn't going to react the way nitro does. It's generally the finish that darkens rather than the wood underneath it. Wood primarily changes color as it oxidises, which is why you can sand an old piece of bare wood and it will look more or less new.  Coated wood doesn't really oxidise,  but clear nitro darkens as it ages. Most polyurethanes do not.

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Yeah, thanks Nick.

As you may recall, it came to me coated in 'polyshade' type coating which I stripped to this point. The chemical that removed the poly didn't mess with this satin finish, which buffed out nicely. I may have to touch a tiny area with dif solvents to figure out what it is.  Whoever sprayed this coating on did a masterful job, like glass, with no spray beading.  Obviously something to not mess with.

Dave

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12 hours ago, jedzep said:

Yeah, thanks Nick.

As you may recall, it came to me coated in 'polyshade' type coating which I stripped to this point. The chemical that removed the poly didn't mess with this satin finish, which buffed out nicely. I may have to touch a tiny area with dif solvents to figure out what it is.  Whoever sprayed this coating on did a masterful job, like glass, with no spray beading.  Obviously something to not mess with.

Dave

It might be an acrylic lacquer rather than nitro. Nitro seems to age in a unique manner, which is the primary reason these darken so much over time. You really see it clearly in old Martins vs new ones that are not done with tinted ("aged") lacquer.

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I think you're onto something there, as it reminds me of the acrylic floor polys I've used, adding zero character or color to the wood, almost like laying a piece of clear food wrap over it.  Also, it has superior hardness, showing no wear in the pick guard area, only shine where the side of my hand rubs and rests.
 

The guitar is so light and thin topped, I can't help but think it adds crispy life to the great dry tone. You have one much like it so I'm preaching to the choir. If I can get the sound hole ring restored I'll put the original guard back on and call it a win.

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3 minutes ago, jedzep said:

I think you're onto something there, as it reminds me of the acrylic floor polys I've used, adding zero character or color to the wood, almost like laying a piece of clear food wrap over it.  Also, it has superior hardness, showing no wear in the pick guard area, only shine where the side of my hand rubs and rests.
 

The guitar is so light and thin topped, I can't help but think it adds crispy life to the great dry tone. You have one much like it so I'm preaching to the choir. If I can get the sound hole ring restored I'll put the original guard back on and call it a win.

 It all sounds like a plan. And yes, I know what you mean about these guitars.

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