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Help! Mold inside my '34 Jumbo Mold

#1 User is offline   Ty in VT 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 08:47 AM

A few months ago I acquired a '34 Jumbo from a well known dealer in an internet transaction that he had been consigned. Recently, I stuck my phone inside the soundhole to take pictures of the bracing. I was shocked to find a lot of mold. None of my other guitars have it, and I sequestered the guitar from my others, none of which have any issues.

I've asked a few luthiers, including 2 with great experience in vintage guitars, but none experienced in mold. Help! What should I do? Brush it, vacuum out the easy stuff, wipe/spray various bleach solutions? And how about the case? Just sunlight? I actually don't see any evidence within the case yet, but I'm sure it's in there.

Thanks in advance,

Ty

Attached File(s)


1921 Martin 0-18k
1934 Gibson Jumbo
1944 Gibson Banner J-45
1945 Martin 0-18
1957 Gibson ES-175
1966 Martin D-18
1976 Contreras Classical
1982 D'Aquisto Excel Archtop
1983 PRS Dragon III
1984 Alembic Spoiler Bass
2003 Manzer Custom Archtop "Wildwood"


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#2 User is online   Dave F 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 12:15 PM

I had a similar issue a few years ago.
I wiped the inside down with a mold removal made for bare wood and then followed it up with the rice where you put some rice in the sound hole, plug up the sound hole then shake it vigorously. I repeated the process one time.
Checked it with a UV light afterwards and it was okay. It did not return. I wished I had taped over the markings inside, they were pretty faint by the time I was done.
Good Luck
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#3 User is offline   Ty in VT 

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 07:04 PM

Thanks. Also posted this question to the UMGF, got one similar response of "baking soda and rice". TJ Thompson also responded to an email and suggested using a brush, vacuuming out the mold, and eventually lightly misting some anti-mold mixture. Someone else suggested UV light, but I'm worried about the heat from the light doing damage to the hide glue joints.

I especially liked the tip about taping over the markings--thanks again.
1921 Martin 0-18k
1934 Gibson Jumbo
1944 Gibson Banner J-45
1945 Martin 0-18
1957 Gibson ES-175
1966 Martin D-18
1976 Contreras Classical
1982 D'Aquisto Excel Archtop
1983 PRS Dragon III
1984 Alembic Spoiler Bass
2003 Manzer Custom Archtop "Wildwood"


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#4 User is online   Dave F 

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 08:31 AM

View PostTy in VT, on 12 April 2019 - 07:04 PM, said:

Thanks. Also posted this question to the UMGF, got one similar response of "baking soda and rice". TJ Thompson also responded to an email and suggested using a brush, vacuuming out the mold, and eventually lightly misting some anti-mold mixture. Someone else suggested UV light, but I'm worried about the heat from the light doing damage to the hide glue joints.

I especially liked the tip about taping over the markings--thanks again.

The UV light is just to check if the mold is gone If you darken the room and shine the light inside, all organic material will glow, including most glues.
Good luck!
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#5 User is offline   bobouz 

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 02:36 PM

View PostDave F, on 13 April 2019 - 08:31 AM, said:

The UV light is just to check if the mold is gone If you darken the room and shine the light inside, all organic material will glow, including most glues.
Good luck!

Nasty things can reside in guitar cases, too. On my older instruments, I've swapped out the original cases for new SKB-type thermoplastic.

Cases mean next to nothing to me, but original cases are very important to some. They obviously can be kept, if one desires, for future resale with a companion vintage piece.
> Gibsons: '22 "A" Mandolin / '66 ES 125T / '66 Epi FT-45n Cortez (B-25) / '90 Tennessean
'00 J-100 Xtra / '02 J-45 Rosewood / '02 SG Faded-moon / '07 CJ-165ec / '09 ES 339
'10 ES 330L / '11 ES 335-P90s / '12 ES 330 VOS / '12 LP Special / '12 J-185
'13 LG2-AE / '13 Midtown Kalamazoo / '14 J-15 / '15 J-50 CS
> Epiphones: '00 AIUSA-John Lee Hooker 1964 Sheraton / '05 McCartney 1964 Texan (Terada)
'09 Elitist 1965 Casino / > Ibanez: '81 M-340 / > Breedlove: '10 American Series OO Mandolin
> Guilds: '73 F-30R / '74 F-40 / '76 G-37 / '92 D-6 / '94 JF-30 / '97 Starfire / '14 Savoy A-150b
> Martins: '00 OOO-16 / '01 Custom Rosewood Dreadnought
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#6 User is offline   OldCowboy 

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 07:07 PM

 bobouz, on 13 April 2019 - 02:36 PM, said:

Nasty things can reside in guitar cases, too. On my older instruments, I've swapped out the original cases for new SKB-type thermoplastic.

Cases mean next to nothing to me, but original cases are very important to some. They obviously can be kept, if one desires, for future resale with a companion vintage piece.

Two excellent points here that deserve note: if you're fortunate enough to score an original case with a vintage guitar it adds to the history of the instrument - but it's a good idea to use a newer one for gigs and/or everyday use, as they're often more protective and sturdy. Many of us have paid good $ for 'period correct' cases, and some actual collectors (even those who don't play😞) tend to be more interested if the original case is part of a deal.
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