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Truss rod maxed out need advice


Lungimsam

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Needed more relief, but rod won't budge. What should I do?

 

 

Depends on what you're really saying ....

 

Won't budge, cuz you've tightened it as far as it goes ?

No wonder you have too little relief. Max tightening of

the rod is how you flatten a neck ... so just back it off.

 

OR ....

 

Won't budge cuz it's seized, frozen, etc ? Try a lotta

WD40, and then carefully try to back it off.

 

Usually, the nut is brass and rod is steel, so seizure

from corrosion is nearly impossible. Only if the threads

are quite damaged, usually via cross threading, would a

nut seize on the threaded rod. If you bought it new, or

if you know it used to work OK, and you're sure it's not

cross threaded etc, then the "siezure" can be simply the

nut againstst the surface behind it, but [fortunately]

not a seizure of the threading. To free a nut from the

surface behind it, use WD40 and just try rocking it back

and forth [rotationally] about 1/16 turn. If the nut is

stuck cuz it's max tightened [which would agree with the

stated lack of relief] .... and it's REALLY not budging

cuzza the pressure involved in keeping the neck so flat,

then loosen the strings, lay the neck face down supported

only at the heal and near the nut. Now, if your assistant

applied moderate pressure to the back of the nek, near

the middle, that pressure is doing the same job as a maxed

out, too-tight truss rod .... thus your assistant is now

unloading some of thepressure in the truss rod .... which

makes it safer and easier to unstick the nut from the

surface behind it.

 

If you're not cool with the feel of this stuff ["feel" is

meant literally], get some experienced help.

 

 

 

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Uhmmnnn .... considering the wording of the thread title,

maybe I shoulda started with basics ? A neck with relief

is the opposite conditon of a too-flat neck. No offence

intended, but unless the title is mis-worded, your take

on how to adjust a neck is exactly backwards.

 

To flatten a neck, thus reducing relief, one tightens the

truss rod. Relief is not simply "action height" [altho it

will affect that, too]. Relief is the slight curve in the

neck that is necessary to prevent the string from buzzing

against the fret that is one fret sharper than the fret

you are fretting.

 

Action height is adjusted at the bridge. Relief must be

adjusted via the truss rod. Relief adjustment is normally

necessary for only two reasons: changes in seasons, or a

change in string tension [different guage or nonstandard

tuning]. A third reason is simply dissatisfaction with

as-delivered relief [very common]. I cannot imagine any

other reasons.

 

 

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I have been trying higher and higher gauges over the years. I am now at 45-109, which is perfect for me. But with the action set my desired height at 8/64-6/64 and some concaveness of neck, I am getting flat notes between 5th and 12th frets.

 

I took off the neck, gently tried to turn the nut to no avail. It will easily turn the opposite direction, though. My auth. serv. guy is on the mend and can't help me right now.

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I have been trying higher and higher gauges over the years.

I am now at 45-109, which is perfect for me. But with the

action set my desired height at 8/64-6/64 and some concaveness

of neck, I am getting flat notes between 5th and 12th frets.

 

I took off the neck, gently tried to turn the nut to no avail.

It will easily turn the opposite direction, though. My auth.

serv. guy is on the mend and can't help me right now.

 

OKeedokee .... now THAT is a clear description.

Your hardware is intact, not damaged, and you've

felt the nut hitting the limit of the threaded

section of the rod. You gotta back that nut away

from the limit that it has currently run into ....

and yet still provide it a means to exert force

against the surface behind it.

 

How-to:

 

You can add a washer behind the rod nut. Usually,

it requires an unusual washer, cuz the rod diameter

is such that a washer that will drop over the rod

is generally too large at the outside diameter for

the clearance available in the access socket to the

rod nut. IOW you need a washer whose outer diameter

is not very much bigger than it's inside diameter

[meaning, the hole].

 

A thicker than typical washer is also recommended.

Drill a hole in a penny, and grind down the outer

diameter to allow it to fit down into the hole. It

might be a square sided hole, and so you needn't

make the outer shape round .... or it may need to be

round. You look at the access socket and you see

what shape will work. Pennies are just soft zinc

under the copper plating, very easy to shape.

 

When a rod is maxed out like yours is, it's not

that the rod can't handle any more load [tension].

It's just that the nut has 'found' the limit of the

the threads on the rod and is up against the solid,

non-threaded, main section of the rod. The washer

[really a spacer in htis application] moves the nut

away from the end of the threads, which typically

adds about 1.5 more avaialbe turns.

 

No worry about tension. A rod can very well deal

with a string set like yours, in terms of ability

to handle tension. It's not that your truss rod is

at its torsional limit. It's just that there's not

quite enuf wood behind it to allow it to do it's

job before running out of travel along the threads.

 

The penny can be put in a vise or a strong pliers,

and shaped with the simplest handheld power tools,

just a drill and grinding wheel or cutting wheel.

The result can be uglee, since it will be hidden

from view. It just hasta be functional as a spacer.

 

 

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