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Smurfbird

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About Smurfbird

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  1. With Gibson's less than precise numbering system back in the '60s, it's also possible to be in possession of a '66, '67, '68 or '69 despite what the numbers tell you. As the owner of one such devil -- general consensus here and elsewhere was '66-'68 -- I can say mine is plenty loud, lighter on bass than my '64J45 and OK by me since I like narrow nuts.
  2. Not sure if it's been mentioned but Time Fades Away is available for download at iTunes and for streaming at Spotify. It's not a CD, of course, or even an LP, but it's a way of hearing/owning/renting the music.
  3. I don't know about you, but I ALWAYS buy my lunch from the guy in the men's room.
  4. My local guitar shop is a one-man operation called Stockade Guitars in Kingston, NY. For a small shop, the owner Ted Lawrence, gets lots of cool used guitars through his doors. He recently had a 1965 Gibson Country-Western for $2250 and it flew out the door before I could figure out how to reconfigure my finances to grab it. Now, I walk in and he has a gorgeous '63 L-45 with plastic adj. saddle and swooning cherry burst. His price is good, too, at $3750. The guide I looked at had that price somewhere on the lower end. If I didn't already own a '64 J-45, I'd be tempted. One of the store's advantages is its proximity to Woodstock, NY, where many established, veteran musicians have settled down. It's not uncommon to learn that a particular amp or guitar was once owned by Rick Danko or Larry Campbell, John Sebastian or Richard Buckner. Quality vintage stuff floats in and out. If you're visiting Big Pink (now a B&B!!!) or attending a concert at Levon Helm's barn or the Bearsville Theater, be sure to wander through Kingston. Record stores, book shops, guitar shops, cafes...both cheap eats and fancier stuff.
  5. I own a '58 D28 and a 2011 J200. For so many reasons, the D28 is the keeper. But it's a ludicrous comparison to make. However, in terms of new guitars, I've been most impressed with the HD-28. Had I not been in the mood for a Gibson at the time, I would've bought the HD28 in 2012. But I grabbed a beautiful J200. It is quieter than I expected. However, when used with the pickup (Fishman Aura Ellipse) it records well and sounds quite nice. Its size for me is too big to enjoy for more than short periods. I've learned the hard way I prefer little guitars. My advice is to listen to your heart. The one you connect with is the right one. The J200 likes new strings, even coated strings. It needs them in order to shine. If you prefer the thump, you can let them get older. Only you know what you listen for and only you know how you will use it. I didn't feel like the videos gave me a winner or loser. A different day likely different results. Let us know how you do!
  6. For years the only acoustics I owned were my dad's D28 and my 76 d25M and while the D28 was in a class of its own, the Guild had a warmth that made it a joy to play. The low end practically curled when struck. The biggest mistake I ever made was deciding to sell it rather than get its neck reset. I went out and bought a 2008 Gibson Hummingbird that didn't come close in terms of tone or comfort. That led me into a goose chase that I've finally sorta ended. I just need to sell a bunch of guitars to get it where it makes sense to me. I can't play 11 acoustic guitars. And yes to how beautifully it played with OLD strings on it. Never needed to change them to bring it alive. I still toy with the idea of getting another '70s model, but no more internet deals for me. I either buy the guitar that feels right in the store or nothing.
  7. Nothing to add. But Welcome Back. Could you post some links to your music? I discovered your stuff years ago on here and was pleasantly surprised at how much I liked it!
  8. My issues with the dreaded Tinnitus began at age 12 when I slammed my head into the end of a pointy desktop. I required three stitches and I immediately lost a tremendous amount of hearing in my right ear that was replaced by a constant ringing. Its volume lowered after the first week but was always there. Then in my early 20s, my left ear began giving me trouble. At age 22, in the late fall, I had both low and high tones screaming in my left ear. I would mask it by always having music on and jamming the radio between stations as I slept. I dropped out of student teaching because I couldn't hear the students any longer. I'd been told the ringing had been caused due to a buildup of fluid in my middle ear and stress in general. I began taking whatever the equivalent of Alavert/Claritin was at that time. By the summer it was mostly a low grade high ring. At age 25, my dad passed in January. One April morning I woke up with my left ear ringing out of control. I couldn't hear human voices above the ringing. Only a TV at very large volume worked for me. I began taking Alavert and cranking the radio between stations until it lowered to a tolerable level. It drove me nut for nearly a year. My last bout was in 2002-03, age 34-35. It wasn't nearly as bad but I had waves during the day where it would spike up. I've learned to love my white noise machines. I long ago gave up on hearing people in crowded rooms. I sometimes struggle to hear people in a quiet room, depending on how their voice travels. The ringing varies. It's always there but not always that annoying. I began trying out a hearing aid this past year. It's weird. It makes the background noises so loud that it can be hard to hear people, BUT it does raise what little high end I have to the point where some people come in clearer. The problem is that sometimes the volume becomes too much and it causes my ear to ring!! Damned if I do, damned if..... I'm 48 now and at different times in my life I thought I'd be completely deaf by now. At certain low points, I thought I'd be dead, driven to suicide due to endless ringing. Thankfully, knock on wood, I've hung in there and the ringing can be a non-issue for long periods. But I've brought air filter machines (before discovering white noise machines) to offices and found ways to work from home where I control the environment. I still sometimes play my music too loud but not as loud as many people dare. People will good hearing tell me I play most things too loud. But I'm only getting enough sound to understand what's going on. I watch the TV with headphones and closed captioning on. You adapt. Besides, I have other medical issues that are more concerning (none fatal, just chronic). I can hear today. I still enjoy playing guitar and my Nord keyboard, but I can't be in a band with a drummer or a loud guitarist.
  9. After reading the criticisms here, I clicked on the link expecting the worst and what I heard was hardly unlistenable. There were a few questionable notes but it only added to the authenticity as far as I'm concerned. Lars, don't listen to the naysayers. So you're not a professional singer. You fingerpick quite nicely and your songs have heart. As a fellow Will Oldham fan, I'm comfortable with the plainly sung.
  10. LG-1s are usually one of the cheapest ways to get a vintage Gibson. They're prettier than the LG-0, which usually run somewhere between $450-$800, and are also ladder-braced. The cheapest entry point I've seen into an X-braced vintage Gibson has been the B25, though keep in mind many of them are 12-string. I like my 6 string model as much as I do my LG3. In fact, maybe more since it's prettier.
  11. Red House Painters -- Songs for a Blue Guitar from the album of the same name.
  12. I have a '66 LG-1 that has the narrowest nut of any guitar I own and I love it. The saddle is nearly flush with the bridge but somehow doesn't need a neck re-set (knock, knock). Because of the precarious buzz-to-action ratio, I only use .10s. Which makes this the nearest to an electric guitar. Yet, after all this, it's plenty loud and lots of fun to play. (I've had several very good guitar players tell me how much they like it despite the narrow nut. Fun seems to be the word). As per buying an LG-1, prices have been drifting upwards. I bought mine around 2013-2014 and paid $800 or so. These days they break $1K, but I would suggest not going much higher than $1100. Those folks asking $1700 and up are the Gary's of the world, where every Gibson model is available for purchase and always for anywhere from $700-5K over the price everyone else is asking. I'd have a full line of Gibsons, too, if I set my asking prices at double the top of the scale. Serious sellers will be glad to take $1100.
  13. This Smurf doesn't care for the blue guitar. But didn't Johnny Cash's first album mention something about a blue guitar?
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