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QuestionMark

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QuestionMark last won the day on August 18 2019

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  1. Kidblast-I enjoyed your singing, song , and the video! Nice pickin’, too! I don’t keep up with the Lounge posts, but I just went in there and read your post w/ details of your fire. Thank God no one was hurt! Nor, your guitars. Take care and keep pickin’. And, thanks for sharing your music and story with us here on the forum. Your forum friends. QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff
  2. Thanks Murph! Glad you enjoyed (dug) it! Stay healthy as you are out and about contributing as an essential. Good people like you make a difference! QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff
  3. Weird comment on my video, my video making skills, my music, my guitar playing, or my song writing skills duly noted. Like I have always said, good art gets a reaction, whatever that reaction may be. Thanks for watching and listening to it! Sorry you didn’t enjoy it. QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff
  4. My suggestion is maybe try calling or writing to Stewart MacDonald, aka as Stew Mac. They carry a large number of replacement guitar parts and hopefully can help you. A Google search should produce their website. Hope this helps. Let us know what happens. QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff
  5. Uncle Fester (aka: BillRoy)-thanks for listening! And, for the comment! 😊 Keep them toes tapping to the music! QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff
  6. Here's an original upbeat instrumental to help counter all of the dreariness of these interesting times. You may recall that during the holiday season I tried to push my musical boundaries by playing some holiday tunes on a classical guitar and trying to stay behind the beat but still within the beat on each tune. With all of the dreariness of these interesting times, I thought I'd try to push my musical boundaries a bit further by writing and playing an original flamenco style song, also on a classical guitar. Here's the URL link to click on: "Crickets" composed/performed by "Jazzman" Jeff Why is it called "Crickets"? To make a long story short, this past winter for totally silly reasons my wife and I kept making jokes about cricket insects. I can't even recall the jokes but we laughed and laughed. And, somewhere in there she asked me to write a piece of music about crickets. The other day I woke up with the melody in my head and then worked on it for a few days, adapting it to guitar. It works that way sometimes. Go figure. Hope you listen and enjoy the music (and hopefully share it.) And, I hope it brightens you days during these dreary times. QM aka "Jazzman" Jeff
  7. Here's an original upbeat instrumental to help counter all of the dreariness of these interesting times. You may recall that during the holiday season I tried to push my musical boundaries by playing some holiday tunes on a classical guitar and trying to stay behind the beat but still within the beat on each tune. With all of the dreariness of these interesting times, I thought I'd try to push my musical boundaries a bit further by writing and playing an original flamenco style song, also on a classical guitar. Here's the URL link to click on: "Crickets" composed/performed by "Jazzman" Jeff Why is it called "Crickets"? To make a long story short, this past winter for totally silly reasons my wife and I kept making jokes about cricket insects. I can't even recall the jokes but we laughed and laughed. And, somewhere in there she asked me to write a piece of music about crickets. The other day I woke up with the melody in my head and then worked on it for a few days, adapting it to guitar. It works that way sometimes. Go figure. Hope you listen and enjoy the music (and hopefully share it.) And, I hope it brightens you days during these dreary times. I welcome any comments on the music! QM aka "Jazzman" Jeff
  8. Thanks for this post. I didn't know that John Prine now has COVID-19 besides all of his other health issues. Let's hope he pulls through okay. He will be in my prayers . QM aka "Jazzman" Jeff
  9. Really great lyrics. Plus, Dylan’s delivery is really good/really haunting. Just listened to it twice to pick up all of lyrics and mood of the song. Disclaimer: I am a Dylan fan. QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff
  10. I use Martin Authentic Acoustics (SPs) 80/20 Bronze Light-Mediums 12.5s on my Epiphone EL-00. Or, if I can’t get them, Martin Authentic Acoustic (SPs) 80/20 Bronze Mediums (13s) on my EL-00. On my 1965 Gibson LG1, also a small bodied guitar, I use Martin Authentic Acoustic (SPs) 80/20 Bronze Lights (12s), but only because it’s an older guitar and I feel 12s rather than 12,5s or 13s will help preserve the older instrument due to 12s giving the guitar a bit less tension on the neck and body. QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff
  11. Gibson flattop guitars have nitro cellulose finishes. Hope this helps. QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff
  12. My suggestion is that you call Gruhn’s Guitars in Nashville, Tennessee. Gruhn’s is the expert on vintage guitars. They usually freely discuss vintage instruments and give out free advice that can be trusted. They will also give you a general price range of the value of a vintage instrument model as well as give good advice. The only thing they won’t do freely is give a bona fide appraisal of a specific instrument unless you pay for it. But, their free advice is priceless and free. Whenever I’m thinking of buying a vintage instrument , I call them first to get the true scoop. They also do vintage instrument repairs at a price, but their repairs are qualified to increase the retail value of an instrument that is in need of repair, although I assume their quality repairs are not inexpensive. Let is know what they tell you if you call them. Hope this helps. QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff
  13. QuestionMark

    Sue

    There is a thread further down below in this Acoustic Epiphone site called Decoding Serial Numbers or something similar that maybe can help you decode your guitar’s serial number. See two paragraphs below for more on this subject. What is interesting about your guitar is that it’s label refers to it as an Epi rather than as an Epiphone. Circa 1978-79 to my recollection, Epiphone introduced a new budget line to the Epiphone line that they called the Epi line. That line was discontinued after a couple of years. And, where the Epiphone line in the 70s were outsourced to Japan to be built, it is known that the Epi line was outsourced elsewhere. Perhaps maybe as a way at the time for Gibson to explore outsourcing future Epiphones elsewhere. After Epiphones we’re built in Japan, they later have been built in Korea, China, and Indonesia, etc. FYI. The above referenced Decoder posting string elsewhere on this site technically applies to the Epiphone line, but maybe it can also be used to decode the Epi line. I’m not sure. Keep in mind that all of the Epiphone guitars in the 70s are tough to decode their serial numbers and many remain a mystery today because of poor record keeping on the Epiphone line during the first decade of Gibson’s exploration into outsourcing the Epiphone line overseas. The Epi line may very well be a part of that mystery and remain so for the same reason. I know in the case of your guitar’s model number, the C very likely just stands for Classical meaning it’s a classical style guitar with nylon strings on it as opposed to steel strings. Plus, Classical guitars generally have 12 frets to where they join the neck as opposed to most steel string guitars that have 14 frets until they join the neck. Players who play classical style guitars include Peter, Paul, and Mary, Willie Nelson, as well as a large number of classical music players such as Segovia. Flamenco guitarists also utilize classical guitars. Although all of the described played high end Martin brand guitars or custom made classicals by luthiers. There is nothing in any case that limits a classical guitar to only one type of music just as there is nothing that limits a steel string guitar to any one type of music. Classical or nylon string guitars have their own unique sound compared to steel string guitars. Classical guitars are a lot easier on the fretting hand although the trade off is typically classical guitars have much wider fretboards than steel string guitars to provide more room for note fretting. The trade off is a wider neck is a bit harder to fret a chord. But, all of that is minimal. I believe the E in your guitar’s model name just refers to it being an Epi model. If by chance your guitar has a pickup in it it could also refer to electric, but, I do not believe that to be the case of your guitar it just likely means an Epi brand Classical guitar. The 100 probably stands for it being more of a beginner guitar as the numbering is low. Epiphone has on other models used the 100 designation to mean its on the scale of a beginner model, so I have no reason to think it’s short lived spin off line used the 100 designation for any other purpose. Perhaps at one time Epiphone may have indicated a 100 model to have its selling price be at $100, but if that is so that would have changed due to inflation although the 100 designation remains I think even today on an Epiphone beginner model. To my recollection, the low priced Epiphone classicals have been heralded as being really good sounding for recording. I have no reason to think that would be different on their short lived Epi line. Maybe someone else can chime in with what wood material the top is made of. On this one, I’m not of much help as I know a lot more about steel string guitar tops than classical guitar tops. I own two classical guitars and even on those I have no clue what their tops are made of or how they are braced. I care more about how they play and sound than that particular detail. I hope all this helps. QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff
  14. Nice looking guitar. Quite a good looking sunburst on it, too. Now I am also curious to learn more about what it might be. What makes you think it’s a Japanese made Epi? I hope your posting leads to learning more info. QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff
  15. I personally use only cloth (seat belt like material) straps with plastic adjusters and solid fabric on the ends. They sell for $5 to $8 and work just fine. Plus, they easily lay on the side of the guitar or over the strings in the case, no need to ever take them off the guitar. Plus, they easily adjust to a length that fits. And, they don’t damage the guitar. The can be used over the end pin and the underside pin on the backside. Or, with a couple inexpensive heavy shoelaces they can easily attach to the headstock rather than the underside pin. To me, it’s all about the guitar and what’s played on it, and not about the strap, thus my use of only basic straps. But, that’s just me. Just my two cents. QM aka “ Jazzman” Jeff
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