Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Recommended Posts

Hey all,

 

I recently picked up a 71' 335 as a project guitar, and am trying to get the right parts on it, but seeing as I've been a Fender guy up to this point I'm finding some blurry answers as to what parts are actually original to that time period. I only need pickups and a bridge.

 

My questions:

 

-Do I need the 70s 'Patent Number' pickups, or should I be searching for a different bucker?

-I understand that early 70s Gibson was using both nylon and steel saddles. What bridge specifically do I need?

 

Pictures below:

 

IMG_4739_zps2a301b10.jpg

IMG_4743_zps9ab08b96.jpg

IMG_4744_zpsb69b7840.jpg

IMG_4745_zpsb94c1493.jpg

 

Thanks for any information you folks may have!

Link to post
Share on other sites

-Do I need the 70s 'Patent Number' pickups, or should I be searching for a different bucker?

-I understand that early 70s Gibson was using both nylon and steel saddles. What bridge specifically do I need?

 

During this period, Gibson was building so many guitars as fast as they could to meet demand, things like standardized parts on specific models kind of fell by the wayside. It more of less became a grab & go, get it out the door manufacturing process. The specs would have simply read "Humbucking pickups", "tune-o-matic bridge".

 

Add to that the fact that someone had cut a "few" extra holes in the top of this guitar (AND robbed all the original parts), you have an instrument that has no "vintage" value or "collectability", regardless of what replacement parts you buy (even if "vintage" parts). So, since the value of this guitar is not really going to be affected by what replacements parts you use, you have a clean slate to make this guitar a real "Player".

 

An ABR-1 bridge (with wire) would be period correct, but I would go with the "no-wire" model as the wire can cause buzz and rattle problems. As for pickups, Gibson makes many different humbucker models these days, I would ask around and research which model really lends itself to making a KILLER sounding 335.

Link to post
Share on other sites

During this period, Gibson was building so many guitars as fast as they could to meet demand, things like standardized parts on specific models kind of fell by the wayside. It more of less became a grab & go, get it out the door manufacturing process. The specs would have simply read "Humbucking pickups", "tune-o-matic bridge".

 

Add to that the fact that someone had cut a "few" extra holes in the top of this guitar (AND robbed all the original parts), you have an instrument that has no "vintage" value or "collectability", regardless of what replacement parts you buy (even if "vintage" parts). So, since the value of this guitar is not really going to be affected by what replacements parts you use, you have a clean slate to make this guitar a real "Player".

 

An ABR-1 bridge (with wire) would be period correct, but I would go with the "no-wire" model as the wire can cause buzz and rattle problems. As for pickups, Gibson makes many different humbucker models these days, I would ask around and research which model really lends itself to making a KILLER sounding 335.

 

Larry, thank you for your response! It's so interesting to me to think about how these guitars were being 'thrown together' at the time.

 

I definitely got this guitar (and a 68' Long Neck 330) to keep forever as 'players', so I wouldn't fear using them for what they were originally made to do.

 

Once I figure out if the stop bar is Nickel or Chrome, I'll pick up a Gibson ABR-1, thank you for that piece of information.

 

As for pickups, I've been reading about (before I posted this thread) how the 'Patent Number' humbuckers of the early to mid 70s sound incredible, and since that was the period in which this I feel a little better about putting them in this guitar (not for value, just for vintage pickup construction to accompany vintage wood).

 

The knobs I have I know aren't period correct either, but I'm not terribly worried about that for the time being.

 

 

Also, if you're interested, here's my other 'player', which is a 68' Long Neck 330 routed for humbuckers with a block of wood under the bridge for feedback. I couldn't ask for a better playing/sounding guitar, but I'm thinking the full block down the center and the stop bar bridge will lend itself to a tone vastly different than that of the 330.

 

68Gibson_zpsc2fe8065.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure that by 1971, the saddles were metal again, rather than nylon. I have a '68 with metal saddles.

 

The stop tail on there is unlikely to be original, either, but as you say, this is a player rather than a collectible. It's pretty easy to tell a nickel stop bar from a chrome one unless both are brand new. Nickel is very slightly magnetic, and chrome isn't, so that can also be an indicator. By the time nickel components have aged a few years, they usually become a duller color with a greenish tinge. Chrome generally stays "chrome-like" forever, except that it can also pit over time, but the pits aren't greenish the way they are in nickel.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure that by 1971, the saddles were metal again, rather than nylon. I have a '68 with metal saddles.

 

The stop tail on there is unlikely to be original, either, but as you say, this is a player rather than a collectible. It's pretty easy to tell a nickel stop bar from a chrome one unless both are brand new. Nickel is very slightly magnetic, and chrome isn't, so that can also be an indicator. By the time nickel components have aged a few years, they usually become a duller color with a greenish tinge. Chrome generally stays "chrome-like" forever, except that it can also pit over time, but the pits aren't greenish the way they are in nickel.

 

It's definitely not original to the guitar, because it's a Japan made Gotoh piece of junk. Needless to say all Gibson parts will be going back on it. Found a discounted Gold Gibson bridge for $35, so I picked that up as a start. I also spoke with Marty Bell about refinishing the body in Seafoam Green, and leaving the body inlays as well as the natural sides.

 

One last question, as for pickup rings, do I need the Historic Spec, which are 1/4" and 1/2" depths, or the normal 1/8" and 3/8"? The pickups I picked up are Patent Number early 70s.

 

Thanks, gentlemen!

Link to post
Share on other sites
One last question, as for pickup rings, do I need the Historic Spec, which are 1/4" and 1/2" depths, or the normal 1/8" and 3/8"?

 

Never say "last question", we're here to help, AND you have to give us regular updates (with photos)!

 

As for the pickup rings, he's what I do for my "arched top" guitars. Buy the taller rings and contour the bottoms to fit the arch of the top AND be level (parallel) to the string path.

 

The Gibson method of taking "stock" rings and bending them across the arch AND with little, or no regard to string plane, has NEVER been acceptable to me!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Never say "last question", we're here to help, AND you have to give us regular updates (with photos)!

 

As for the pickup rings, he's what I do for my "arched top" guitars. Buy the taller rings and contour the bottoms to fit the arch of the top AND be level (parallel) to the string path.

 

The Gibson method of taking "stock" rings and bending them across the arch AND with little, or no regard to string plane, has NEVER been acceptable to me!

 

Understood! I found an ABR-1 Bridge and Gibson rings locally to throw on so I can get her up and running before I worry about shiny gold hardware and finishing details.

 

I had the same thoughts when looking at what I had in front of me. Just bolting them on quick and snapped a few photos of what I'll be working with:

 

IMG_4750_zps25ef158a.jpg

IMG_4754_zpse15ac693.jpg

IMG_4749_zpsd34657a5.jpg

 

 

Pickups should be arriving tomorrow, at which point I will start setting her up. Should be playing here shortly, and I'm darn excited. Once I get it all dialed in I'm going to play it until my undergrad commencement and send her off to get re-finished shortly after.

 

Until then, I'll start accumulating Gold hardware.

 

Opinions are welcome on this matter, but I'm contemplating keeping the guitar without a pick guard.

 

My plan:

 

Seafoam green top and back while leaving the factory finish on the sides, inlays, and neck, utilizing gold Gibson hardware.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Opinions are welcome on this matter, but I'm contemplating keeping the guitar without a pick guard.

 

My plan:

 

Seafoam green top and back while leaving the factory finish on the sides, inlays, and neck, utilizing gold Gibson hardware.

 

 

To my eye, the ES 335 needs the pickguard to look right. Here's my two:

 

ES335sisters.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

To my eye, the ES 335 needs the pickguard to look right.

 

Besides aesthetics, it really IS playing style.

 

I had the PG off my LP and 335 for 30 years, and then I decided to be a jazzman when I grew up. As my playing style changed I found the NEED for a "finger-rest". ALL the pickguards are back on now!

Link to post
Share on other sites

To my eye, the ES 335 needs the pickguard to look right. Here's my two:

 

Nick, beautiful guitars! After looking at solid color 335s without pickguards all night I'm starting to agree with you.

 

Besides aesthetics, it really IS playing style.

 

I had the PG off my LP and 335 for 30 years, and then I decided to be a jazzman when I grew up. As my playing style changed I found the NEED for a "finger-rest". ALL the pickguards are back on now!

 

That's surely true. I left the pickguard on the 330 for that reason. I must say though, I'm quite used to not having a rest at this point, as I got through my Jazz Undergrad without a pickguard and single coils [smile]

 

Were you able to figure out why somebody put those holes in the face of that guitar?

 

I asked around and couldn't get an answer from the previous owner, but it appears as if for whatever reason, someone relocated the controls, and then moved them back [glare]

Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright, got her all wired and setup.

 

Two things that were very unfortunate that I was lied to about:

 

A) The pickups aren't in phase with each other. Individually they sound absolutely incredible.

 

B ) Whoever the idiot was that drilled for the stop tail mustn't have taken their time, or even measurements for that matter, because it's completely off.

 

However the guitar plays and sounds like a dream given those two circumstances. Just a shame people have to be shady and hide things like that just to make a sale. This just went from an easy project to an extremely difficult one.

 

Pictures:

 

IMG_4867_zps246b362d.jpg

IMG_4869_zpsf12ab2cc.jpg

IMG_4871_zps934c6290.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright, got her all wired and setup.

 

Two things that were very unfortunate that I was lied to about:

 

A) The pickups aren't in phase with each other. Individually they sound absolutely incredible.

 

B ) Whoever the idiot was that drilled for the stop tail mustn't have taken their time, or even measurements for that matter, because it's completely off.

 

However the guitar plays and sounds like a dream given those two circumstances. Just a shame people have to be shady and hide things like that just to make a sale. This just went from an easy project to an extremely difficult one.

 

Pictures:

 

IMG_4867_zps246b362d.jpg

 

 

You know, I'm really starting to like that top 'burst, even with the plugged holes in it. They give it a unique character.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"This just went from an easy project to an extremely difficult one." QUOTE

 

You'll have that......

 

Just like the multi-plugged holes....[scared]

 

And remember, its a '71 and not a '61

 

Duly noted! It's going to take everything out of me to not bring it to perfection. I must say though, I get frustrated looking at it and pick it up and plug it in and my negative feelings are immediately rectified.

 

You know, I'm really starting to like that top 'burst, even with the plugged holes in it. They give it a unique character.

 

I'm starting to feel the same way. The stop tail is currently my main frustration at the moment.

 

It's perfectly imperfect ;)

So, you know how to fix the pups, right?

Did this guitar have a trapeze tailpiece originally?

 

I believe the guitar had a trapeze originally. To fix the phasing I need to flip the magnet, correct?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Duly noted! It's going to take everything out of me to not bring it to perfection. I must say though, I get frustrated looking at it and pick it up and plug it in and my negative feelings are immediately rectified.

 

 

 

I'm starting to feel the same way. The stop tail is currently my main frustration at the moment.

 

It's perfectly imperfect ;)

 

 

I believe the guitar had a trapeze originally. I know that on Fenders there were two wires that could be switched to fix phasing issues, but I haven't researched on how to fix the phasing issue with my current situation. I'm all ears!

 

It's just like that. A simple solder job but you have to pop the cover off. The two coils are connected to each other. I believe you unsolder the leads on one coil and switch which wire goes to the other coil. The other coil stays the same. You just do this operation on one pickup. You should be able to find details on Google or You Tube I would think. I'll see if I can find some more info.

 

Just did some research and apparently you can flip one of the magnets and accomplish the same thing without soldering.

 

How to fix

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's just like that. A simple solder job but you have to pop the cover off. The two coils are connected to each other. I believe you unsolder the leads on one coil and switch which wire goes to the other coil. The other coil stays the same. You just do this operation on one pickup. You should be able to find details on Google or You Tube I would think. I'll see if I can find some more info.

 

Just did some research and apparently you can flip one of the magnets and accomplish the same thing without soldering.

 

How to fix

 

I appreciate that! I used it on a jazz gig last night and the guitar was incredible. My lack of use for the 'middle position' may drive me away from rippin the pickup apart just yet.

 

Now I'll have the info for when I do decide to fix it though!

 

Would you guys have any interest in a sound demo?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...