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Looking to buy first Gibson Acoustic


Ripper

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I'm looking for a little advice. I want to get myself a Gibson acoustic but I'm not sure which models would suit me the best. Acousticly I play mostly celtic and some acoustic rock. I currently have a Seagull S6+ and my old Espana. I like a thinner neck on my acoustics. where I live I don't get alot of chance to play Gibson acoustics so any advice would be greatly appreciated.

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Are you after a Jumbo, Dreadnought or small bodied guitar?

 

Gibson guitars aren't famed for skinny necks (apart from late '60s Gibsons which had really slim necks, about the same dimensions as a Fender Bullet), but the shorter scale guitars such as the J45, J185 and Hummingbird have slightly less string tension and, as such, are very easy to play.

 

I would maintain that the Hummingbird and J45 are two very good all-rounders that have been around for a long time and are very popular...in fact, the Hummingbird is the most recorded acoustic guitar of all time.

 

Mahogany models are lively sounding with a bright but balanced tone, Maple models are slightly mid-scooped with bell-like highs and bold, booming lows, whereas Rosewood models are thick, chocolatey and pronounced in the lower mids.

 

I would audition the following:

 

CJ165 Maple

CJ165 Rosewood (165 is a small jumbo with a slightly skinnier neck than other Gibson acoustics in the current catalogue)

 

J45 Mahogany

J45 Rosewood (round-shouldered dreadnought, short scale neck)

 

Advanced Jumbo (round-shouldered Rosewood dreadnought, long scale neck with forward-shifted bracing, very loud guitar)

 

Hummingbird (square shouldered Mahogany dreadnought, short scale neck)

 

Dove (square shouldered Maple dreadnought, long scale neck)

 

J185 (Maple mid-sized jumbo)

 

SJ200 (Maple super jumbo)

 

SJ200 Prewar Western Classic (Rosewood super jumbo)

 

Also worth mentioning are the Songwriter and Songwriter Deluxe models. Small dreadnoughts with a big sound.

 

Somewhere in that list will be the guitar that makes your dreams come true. Enjoy the ride!

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wow, thanks for the info! I was thinking dreadnought style but I do like the looks of the jumbos as well. The reason I was after a skinnier neck is that they are more like the neck on an electric. My seagull has a wider neck and I find that it takes me a while to get back onto it when I haven't been playing it for awhile.

 

I am going to have to do some traveling so I can try out some of these (I have played hummingbirds and doves over the years, but not for a long time).

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Jinder gave a great account above and it is spot on! I can add that my Gibson Advanced Jumbo takes to the Celtic tunes I play in DADGAD wonderfully! I am actually prefering it to my Taylor Cedar/Mahoganny GS guitar but I think my ears are turning more toward the Gibson tone away from Taylor as I get older?!?!? I also love playing classic rock stuff and the AJ again is a great choice. It also excells in Open G tuning (Think the Stones Honky Tonk Woman tone acoustically).

 

I also have to add that the couple of J-45's I have played lately have really been sweet. I didn't get to tune them to DADGAD for my Celtic stuff, but I bet they would sound great.

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Hey! What are you doing in this neck of the woods? =D>/

 

Hey there! How are you? I decided it was time to add a Gibson acoustic into the fold, and seeing as how I don't know squat about them I figured I would come looking for some advice. You know me, I am much more of the electric guy, but since I've been between bands, I've really been getting into the acoustic side of things.

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Hey there! How are you? I decided it was time to add a Gibson acoustic into the fold' date=' and seeing as how I don't know squat about them I figured I would come looking for some advice. You know me, I am much more of the electric guy, but since I've been between bands, I've really been getting into the acoustic side of things. [/quote']

I'm doing awful! I think I sprained my left wrist #-o Other than that I'm okay haha

 

Are you going to buy used or new? I'll pm you.....

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I'm doing awful! I think I sprained my left wrist #-o Other than that I'm okay haha

 

Are you going to buy used or new? I'll pm you.....

I was thinking probably used if possible, I've always preferred used as they seem to feel and sound better to me, even electrics. I'll watch for your pm

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I'm looking for a little advice. I want to get myself a Gibson acoustic but I'm not sure which models would suit me the best. Acousticly I play mostly celtic and some acoustic rock. I currently have a Seagull S6+ and my old Espana. I like a thinner neck on my acoustics. where I live I don't get alot of chance to play Gibson acoustics so any advice would be greatly appreciated.

 

If you play celtic lead guitar, I would suggest a J45RW, but if you strum while you sing a standard J45 will do you just fine. If you want to toss a bit more money and have a really vocal instrument, you can consider an Advanced Jumbo as well.

 

If you primarily play on stage, you might want to consider a Songwriter Deluxe.

 

Your S6 Seagull probably has a cedar top (the S6+ is spruce). The warmth of a cedar top with mahogany back and sides is a unique tonality that is difficult to replicate in guitars that don't use cedar.

 

I am not typically a person to recommend Taylor guitars, but in your case you might want to try a few of their current line that have the cedar tops as they do lend themselves well to celtic music.

 

Another guitar you might want to try is a Lowden.

 

If you are absolutely certain that nothing but a Gibson is good enough, and if you can find a dealer with good stock, you might want to throw a Hummingbird Artist into the mix for your test drives.

 

Good luck with your shopping, and don't forget to let us know what you buy.

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If you play celtic lead guitar' date=' I would suggest a J45RW, but if you strum while you sing a standard J45 will do you just fine. If you want to toss a bit more money and have a really vocal instrument, you can consider an Advanced Jumbo as well.

 

If you primarily play on stage, you might want to consider a Songwriter Deluxe.

 

Your S6 Seagull probably has a cedar top (the S6+ is spruce). The warmth of a cedar top with mahogany back and sides is a unique tonality that is difficult to replicate in guitars that don't use cedar.

 

I am not typically a person to recommend Taylor guitars, but in your case you might want to try a few of their current line that have the cedar tops as they do lend themselves well to celtic music.

 

Another guitar you might want to try is a Lowden.

 

If you are absolutely certain that nothing but a Gibson is good enough, and if you can find a dealer with good stock, you might want to throw a Hummingbird Artist into the mix for your test drives.

 

Good luck with your shopping, and don't forget to let us know what you buy.[/quote']

 

I appreciate the info here for sure. Alot of the celtic stuff I am doing right now is more on the rythmn side as the mando takes care of alot of the "soloing" side of things.

 

My seagull is a spruce topped on, that is the reason I got it as my old Espana was a cedar top and I wanted something different. I'm going to have to drive about 4 hours to test out some Gibsons but it willbe a good excuse for a roadtrip. It's not that only a Gibson will do (I'm not hooked on names on the headstocks) it's just that they have been recommended by a few people and I've been happy with them on an electric standpoint (although I have lots of electrics that aren't gibson as well.) I'll keep you posted on how the search goes.

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I'll keep you posted on how the search goes.

 

Looking forward to it. I think it is great that people come here for advice before shopping. I am certain that much of the advice gets ignored when you find yourself in the guitar room - and that is how it should be - but the advice provides a modicum of guidance.

 

Yes indeed, Gibsons do come highly recommended because they simply are what they are - wonderful.

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Looking forward to it. I think it is great that people come here for advice before shopping. I am certain that much of the advice gets ignored when you find yourself in the guitar room - and that is how it should be - but the advice provides a modicum of guidance.

 

Yes indeed' date=' Gibsons do come highly recommended because they simply are what they are - wonderful.[/quote']

 

I figure why not ask the people that play them, good advice is always a good thing.

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If you like doing the drop tunings - the longscale AJ might be interesting. I don't think an AJ will have as much warmth as you're used to, but if you're stuck on a gibson, the AJ's scale might work best for you. They also have a slimmer neck profile.

I have no connection to this guitar- but I saw and Played a Maple Sunburst AJ (used) that was in beautiful shape. It's at the Folkstore in Seattle. That place gets instruments on consignment now and then- always interesting. I think the price was less than a new J45TV, if that's what you're considering.

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Hey Ripper,

 

FWIW, my opinion is that you can't really go wrong with a 'hog J45. I know, I'm biased, I owe one - but they can do most anything, and also I can't remember if I saw a budget? As Gibson models go, they are very well priced, relatively common and "a lot of bang for the buck" I believe is the expression.

 

Just my ten pennyworth!

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