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pauloqs

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pauloqs last won the day on September 11 2019

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About pauloqs

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  • Birthday 02/06/1981

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  1. The 2016 Studio Faded were great. Like you mentioned, the mahogany neck and BB pros, which were used on Standards. Also, the trapezoid inlays and pickup covers. That was truly a Les Paul Studio with a satin finish. It was also refreshing to see a neck carve other than the slim tapper, which Gibson overused it in some recent years. In 2017 Gibson dropped the Studio Faded and put in place the Faded. That’s when you see the maple neck and dot inlays. Now for two things that I think needs clarification, regarding pickups and neck material. The price on Gibson pickups were identical between the BB pros and 490s. Furthermore, although the BB pros were used on the Standards the 490 were being used on the Les Paul Customs. In reality, the BB pro is an upgrade to some, and a downgrade to others, for it is purely a preference thing. Modern studios have mahogany necks. By modern I mean anything from at least 2015 to now. What I think is happening a common confusion between Studios and Faded. It’s the Faded models from 2017 and on that had maple necks. With that said, I understand that there was a lot of variation across the years regarding Studio specs. Binding, no binding, gloss, satin, trapezoid, dots, construction, wood selection etc. My clarification above only applies to 2015 to current studios. With that said, yes I do agree the Studio Faded were fantastic guitars. And I’ll add that 2016 and 2017, Gibson did a fantastic job on the fret ends of unbounded necks, including Faded and Studio Faded. I can’t say the same about my 2018 Faded. I had the tools, so I got rid of my fret sprouts, which then required to round the fret ends. In the process I rounded my fretboard edges a bit for a more comfortable feel. The end result was absolutely fantastic.
  2. Where are you getting your info? It’s always been cream jack plate cover. https://www.gibson.com/Guitar/USA1R6524/Les-Paul-Standard-60s/Iced-Tea I’ve never seen anything stating it was the chrome jack plate cover. edit: and here is a screenshot of the promo video. I magnified the jack.
  3. Congrats. That’s a great guitar. I have one of these in satin blue. At one point I wanted to buy back an R0 that I had sold to get my R9. I was at the store with a couple of guitars. At one point I plug in the Les Paul Special and it just sounds so good, I end up trading in a PRS instead. Maybe started as a junior, but I got the pickguard of a special and a neck P-90 and converted it into a Special. Just an aside is that the name of the model of your guitar is Les Paul Special Tribute DC. Special is a Les Paul with slab body and two P-90s, Tribute refers to the satin finish and that it belongs to the modern collection, and DC is for Double Cut. Juniors will have only a bridge P-90. So the one pickup version of your guitar would be Les Paul Junior Tribute DC. I think the confusion is because there is a singlecut and a doublecut version of the special. The original specials In the ‘50s were indeed double cut. However, at some point Gibson embraced the DC Les Paul and switched. Because there is already a singlecut model of Specials in the current lineup, some will incorrectly conclude that the doublecut can’t have the same name.
  4. I believe I was able to answer my own question. All the 335 models have the same bridge mounting with bushings under the new management. The 2019 models with studs drilled directly to the top were spec’d by the previous management. Thus it seems the only differences across Gibson USA 335/345 models are purely cosmetic.
  5. I’m looking into 335s. The spec sheet on 335 Figured vs 335 (Dot) vs 335 satin show that they are virtually the same guitars apart from some cosmetic differences if we disregard satin vs gloss. However, it seams like most 2018 or older models I find with ABR-1 bridge, the bridge studs are drilled directly onto the body. However, I can’t find any rhyme or reason for how the how the bridge is mounted on 2019 or earlier models. The Figured 335s I’ve come across so far have studs drilled directly to the body, granted I’m not sure they are the new management original collection models or old management 2019 models. As for plain tops, I’ve found both examples of studs drilled directly to the body and examples with bushings. Satin models I’ve come across seem to always have bushings on the top for mounting the bridge. I’m wondering if all Gibson USA are moving towards the ABR-1 mounted with bushings or if some of the models will maintain the Memphis tradition? Is there a any construction differences across these models or is it purely cosmetic? I know this have been asked before for previous years and I believe the only differences were cosmetic at the time. However, I wonder if that’s still true now with the current management? Can anyone confirm if there is indeed a difference in how the bridge is mounted across models figured, plain, satin and 345? Or is that a difference between old an new management, Memphis vs Nashville? This is more a nagging curiosity than a concern, as for me personally it is not a dealbreaker. However it does make me wonder if there is anything under the hood that is different. Like, for instance, neck joint or anything else really. P.S.: I know some people believe this make a difference in tone and some people don’t believe it makes any difference. I don’t really want to get into that discussion. I’m just wandering about the construction for curiosity’s sake. P.S.S.: I know some people on YT describe this method of mounting the bridge as fake ABR-1 or a cross between Nashville and ABR-1. The thing is I can a bit more pedantic than those pedantic YTrs. My understanding is that the part we call bridge on a ToM is the part that is not drilled to the guitar and is held in place in part by the pressure of the strings and is the part that hold the saddles. In my books what they’re using is an ABR-1 bridge. What’s “difference” is how the bridge is mounted. The quotations is because it’s nothing new. We’ve seen this before in previous USA models.
  6. I don’t usually work on bass guitars so take what I’ll say with a grain of salt. I’d try to adjust the pickup height to get similar volume from both pickups.
  7. I wish the 335 got those new headstocks.
  8. They come with Schaller strap locks. That’s cool.
  9. Maybe somebody else can confirm this, but I believe the neck profile is different. I believe the 61 has a slimmer neck. However, I’m not entirely sure so take it with a grain of salt.
  10. These sound awesome. Your images aren’t showing, but when I googled for these I found the Vermillion Bursts to be particularly awesome. I also really like the November burst. The other two are not my thing, but I can understand the appeal. Awesome addition to the lineup.
  11. My understanding is that VOS stands for vintage old spec, but I think vintage old stock would make more sense. A guitar with VOS finish is mimicking the looks, both in the actual finish and hardware, of a guitar from the 50s and early 60s that do not have any play wear whatsoever, but has some aging due to the elapsed time. In other words, the finish is not as shiny and hardware comes with a aged patina. Another finish option is Gloss, which tries to mimic how a guitar would have looked like coming out of the factory back then. R2, R4, R6, R7, R8, R9 and R0 are available/were in both VOS and Gloss finishes. Though I have not seen any new guitar with a Gloss finish since 2017. Regarding G0s, they are, as others pointed out, Guitar Center Exclusive R0 (1960s reissues). The differences are, 1) Price. They are priced about USD$2,000 lower than a “regular” R0; 2) The top. Usually they have plainer tops akin to R8, hence priced similarly to an R8. This means lightly figured or with peekaboo flamed, not necessarily full on plain; 3) No pointers/thumb bleeders; 4) Only one finish option, Gloss. Not available in VOS. The rest is identical to a “regular” R0. Some will even have the R0 stamp inside the control cavity. Long neck tenon, fake bumblebee capacitor, double ring Kluson Deluxe tuners, reflector knobs, everything is there from the “regular” R0. Some finishes received names such as Pg129, instead of your traditional something burst, like my absolute favorite, bourbon burst. That is because the finishes were based on the guitars on Beauty of the Burst. So Pg129 refers to a finish similar to the one found on page 129 of beauty of the burst. This is referring only to the finish, not the year. For instance, page 129 refers to a 1959 burst, the G0/R0 Pg129 is a 1960 reissue (thiner neck) with a finish that mimics that 1959 burst on page 129. I have a R0/G0 and I find it absolutely amazing. Mine is from 2017 and I believe it has a Pg129 like in my example. Here it is next to my R9. And here is the finish it is based on:
  12. That’s an excellent choice. Year in, year out Studios and Classics are great options. They seems to have a bit more attention to detail than Faded & Tribute, but you still aren’t paying a premium for cosmetic features. I’ve played Studios and Classics that sounded better than your average standard. With that said I‘ve played standards & tributes that sound-wise got into custom shop territory and this is coming from a Gibson Custom fan.
  13. Edit: What you posted is NOT a Studio. It is a Studio Tribute, which is a considerably different guitars. In short the Studio Tribute was Gibson's attempt of simplifying the lineup. They replaced the two lower trims, the Faded and Tribute, with one that combined elements of both, the Studio Tribute. Why on earth they bring back the double named models from 2016 that created confusion is beyond me. My suggestion is they should never ever use the word Studio in any other maple/mahogany body singlecut LP model other than the Studio. I've seen my fair share of Faded being sold as Studios in the used market and it's a big pet peeve I have. Gibson changed CEO this year. Before that, they changed the lineup every year. Announcement of the new lineup happened in the fall. So, for instance, the 2017 models were announced and released in 2016. Thus, in 2018 a 2019 model lineup was announced and released under the old directive. The 2019 models under the old CEO evolved from the 2016 models. So let’s start with that. In 2016 there were: Studio Faded: Worn Satin finish, Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, '59 rounded neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker Pro, PCB wiring, no coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, gig bag, Studio truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge. Tribute 50s & 60s: Satin finish, Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, '50s rounded (50s) and Slim Taper (60s) neck profiles, Trapezoid inlays, uncovered 490R/498T (50s) and P-90 (60s), PCB wiring, no coil tap, plain maple top, reflector knobs & pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, gig bag, blank truss rod cover, Nashville Bridge. Studio: Gloss finish, Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/498T, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge. Classic: Gloss finish, ?, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, zebra '57Classic/'57Classic+, ?, ?, plain maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. Traditional: Gloss finish, 9-hole weight relief, Mahogany neck, Traditional neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered '57Classic/'57Classic+, ?, no coil tap, AA maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. Standard: Gloss finish, modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, AAA maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. All these models were available in two different specs Traditional (T) vs High Performance (HP). The specs above are based on the T spec models. Then in 2017 was somewhat similar to 2016, same T and HP spec availability. Gibson introduces the ultra modern weight relief. The studio faded created (and still creates) a lot of confusion between it and the studio, so the studio faded essentially became the faded. Here is the summary of 2017: Faded: Worn Satin finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Maple neck, slim taper neck profile, dot inlays, uncovered 490R/490T, PCB wiring, no coil tap, plain maple top, top hat knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, gig bag, blank truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge. Tribute: Satin finish, 9-hole Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, slim taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/490T, PCB wiring, no coil tap, plain maple top, reflector knobs & pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, gig bag, Tribute truss rod cover, Nashville Bridge. Studio: Gloss finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/498T, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge. Classic: Gloss finish, 9-hole, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, zebra '57Classic/'57Classic+, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover locking tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. Traditional: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, Traditional neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. Standard: Gloss finish, ultra modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, AAA maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. 2018 there are small changes, like, gig bags are replaced with soft cases. One major change is that only the Standard is available in HP specs. The biggest change occurs with the Classics, that instead of humbuckers came with P-90s. Faded: Worn Satin finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Maple neck, slim taper neck profile, dot inlays, uncovered 490R/490T, PCB wiring, no coil tap, plain maple top, top hat knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, soft case, blank truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge. Tribute: Satin finish, no Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, slim taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/498T, PCB wiring, no coil tap, plain maple top, reflector knobs & pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, soft case, Tribute truss rod cover, Nashville Bridge. Studio: Gloss finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered '57 Classic/'57 Classic+, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no body binding and white fretboard, Nashville Bridge. Classic: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, P-90s, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, N/A, maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. Traditional: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, Standard neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, top hat knobs w/ pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. Standard: Gloss finish, ultra modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, AAA maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. All this time people were complaining that the lineup was too complicated. So the 2019 models under the old directive tried to shorten the lineup. Noticing the similarities between the Faded and the Tribute, they release a new model that combine features from both. In my opinion this is the worst model ever created. It had the finish of tributes that in my opinion didn't go well with the dot inlays (I don't mind the dot inlays so much on the Faded). This is the guitar you linked. Here is the old 2019 lineup. Studio Tribute (the aberration): Satin finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Maple neck, slim taper neck profile, dot inlays, uncovered 490R/490T, PCB wiring, no coil tap, plain maple top, top hat knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, soft case, Tribute truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge. Studio: Gloss finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/498T, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no body binding and white fretboard, Nashville Bridge. Classic: Gloss finish, 9-hole weight relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, zebra 61R/61T, PCB wiring, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, maple top, reflector knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. Traditional: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, Standard neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, top hat knobs w/ pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. Standard: Gloss finish, ultra modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & slug selection + 5 internal dip switches (HP wiring), AAA maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. Then came the new CEO and decided to change directions. The year model was no more. Instead there is now an Original Collection and a Modern Collection. Restricting to just the maple on mahogany singlecut LPs, here is a summary: Modern Collection: Tribute: Satin finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Maple neck, rounded taper neck profile, trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/490T, PCB wiring, no coil tap, plain maple top, top hat knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, soft case, Tribute truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge. Studio: Gloss finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/498T, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge. Classic: Gloss finish, 9-hole weight relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, zebra Burstbucker 61R/Burstbucker 61T, PCB wiring, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, maple top, reflector knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. Modern: Gloss finish, ultra modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge, ebony fretboard, access heel joint. Original Collection: Standard 50s: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, 50s neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2 or P90s, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, top hat knobs w/ pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge, narrower headstock, thinner binding. Standard 60s: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, 60s Slim taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 61R/Burstbucker 61T, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, reflector knobs w/ pointers, Grover tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge, narrower headstock, thinner binding. I hope this helps. Whether you're a beginner, advanced beginner, intermediate, advanced or professional player is irrelevant to which guitar you should get. What you should ask is whether you can afford it, is the "improvement" of going up in the lineup worth it to you, and do you think you're going to stick with playing in the long run.
  14. R4s and R6s have Custom Soapbar P90s, which is different than what’s found in Gibson USA with P90s. With that said Gibson both USA and Custom have nailed P90s down. They’re absolutely phenomenal.
  15. Honestly, I don’t mind the maple neck. I actually think it’s a cool feature. Especially if they look like this (Dark Knight LP)
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