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Custom Advanced Jumbo Questions


high_plains

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I'm still learning about what makes model X different model Y from model Z, but I'm stumped on this one. Gibson experts, can you help me out?

 

Besides the "bling" factor, what would be the difference between a custom short-scale Advanced Jumbo with mahogany back and sides and a J-45 standard? Is the internal bracing really that different to cause a significant change in the tonal properties of the guitar?

 

I ask only because there's just such an AJ at Wildwood guitars in Denver and, well, I'm curious.

 

Thanks -

 

HP

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You've pretty much caught them with their shorts down on this one, I think. A short-scale hog AJ is pretty much a contradiction in terms, although I know they exist. Maybe it would be more rightly be called a J-45 with AJ appointments........

 

I guess, being Gibson, they can build what they want, and call it whatever they want.

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It would be basically a J-35, as the bracing is consistent with the AJ. In other words brighter, more airy tone than a standard J-45.

 

Ah. So, if the J-35s weren't re-released until 2012, this guitar could have been an attempt to fin that tone before it were available in the J-35. That makes sense.

 

http://www.wildwoodguitars.com/products/00896054.php?CategoryID=121&n=17

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Seems to me the error here is not in the concept of the guitar, but in the concept of the marketing. True enough, it really does seem like they've been caught with their pants down there. Had they called it an AJ-45 and gave it some spin about people "loving the icon that is the J-45 with the added power of an advanced jumbo" folk might have warmed quicker to the notion… as it is, it reads quite poorly, a company of that size must surely be able to see that.

 

For a company that makes cool guitars their marketing approach does its damnedest to make them as uncool as possible.

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Well, I think it *is* a cool guitar, & would love to try it.. With respect to the op's recent post, there was much good discussion on this forum regarding the marketing behind the new J-35, more to do with marketing savvy than the desire to offer a new tone.

 

As far as what this guitar might sound like; I think there 1 or 2 forum members here who have short-scale AJ's: doesn't Guth (Bill) have one in birdseye maple, & I thought the exiled OneWilyFool had one(?). Regardless, if it does have the AJ bracing, it could be punchier, but, now with this one's hog back & sides and short scale length, could it still have the warmth that the J-45's can do so well(?).

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The Advanced Jumbo's BACK BRACING is different from a J-45's.

 

The Advanced Jumbo has comparatively massive and heavy back braces. They are usually referred to as the "low and wide" style. The two at the widest part of body, called the the #3 and #4 braces, are something like 1/2" thick almost.

 

SOME J-45's, most famously the True Vintage model, have the AJ's wide x, forward-shifted bracing. The Standard and most other models does not. The new J-35 DOES have this top bracing, but has the J-45 Standard's BACK bracing (which is yet again different from the True Vintage's back bracing, which is lighter).

 

The Fuller's J-35 had both the AJ's low and wide, heavy back bracing AND the wide, forward shifted x brace. So THIS guitar is most akin to the short-scale mahogany AJ, EXCEPT that they have different types of spruce on the top. The Fuller's J-35 RI has an Adi top; the short-scale AJ has Sitka.

 

The chart below (based on my observation) shows what style X bracing each of the guitars has, the comparative weight of the back braces, and the type of top wood.

 

AJ (Production Model)

Top Bracing: Wide X

Back Bracing: Heavy

Top Wood: Sitka

 

J-45 Standard

Top Bracing: Standard X

Back Bracing: Medium

Top Wood: Sitka

 

J-45 True Vintage

Top Bracing: Wide X

Back Bracing: Light Weight

Top Wood: Adirondack

 

"New" J-35

Top Bracing: Wide X

Back Bracing: Medium

Top Wood: Sitka

 

Fuller's 1939 J-35 Reissue

Top Bracing: Wide X

Back Bracing: Heavy

Top Wood: Adirondack

 

Mahogany Short-Scale AJ

Top Bracing: Wide X

Back Bracing: Heavy

Top Wood: Sitka

 

Red 333

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Well, I think it *is* a cool guitar, & would love to try it.. With respect to the op's recent post, there was much good discussion on this forum regarding the marketing behind the new J-35, more to do with marketing savvy than the desire to offer a new tone.

 

As far as what this guitar might sound like; I think there 1 or 2 forum members here who have short-scale AJ's: doesn't Guth (Bill) have one in birdseye maple, & I thought the exiled OneWilyFool had one(?). Regardless, if it does have the AJ bracing, it could be punchier, but, now with this one's hog back & sides and short scale length, could it still have the warmth that the J-45's can do so well(?).

 

I'm on my way down to Denver and Wildwood Guitars today to play some guitars and this AJ is on my list. I'll let you know how it compares to the J-45s they have in stock.

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Seems to me the error here is not in the concept of the guitar, but in the concept of the marketing. True enough, it really does seem like they've been caught with their pants down there. ...

Gibson marketing had nothing to do with it. A dealer called Bozeman and asked if they would build them some short-scale AJs using a variety of woods for the backs and rims. The reaction was about what you would expect: an unvoiced thought along the lines of "Are you nuts?", followed by actually saying "Sure! You guys are a great dealer for us and we're always happy to do whatever we can for you."

 

-- Bob R

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Gibson marketing had nothing to do with it. A dealer called Bozeman and asked if they would build them some short-scale AJs using a variety of woods for the backs and rims. The reaction was about what you would expect: an unvoiced thought along the lines of "Are you nuts?", followed by actually saying "Sure! You guys are a great dealer for us and we're always happy to do whatever we can for you."

 

-- Bob R

 

Well, they as a corporation are quite stipulative about what makes a dealer a certain rank of dealer etc… I certainly understand the lure of a good order, but surely they must also be stipulative about nomenclature also… else what's to stop people ordering a J-46 or a J-47.9? Entering the realms of ridiculous for sure, but is it much more ridiculous than the selling line here? Not sure…. Clouding strong brand definition points creates confusion and seems pointless given it's small run stuff.

 

Anyway enough chitter-chatter, I'm off to try ordering a 'J-51 and a wee bit' for my nearest non-sensical dealer.

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