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1 9/16 Nut for 1967 Southern Jumbo


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I recently acquired a Right Hand 1967 Southern Jumbo that is in especially clean condition, but as I began to clean it up and restring it, I discovered that the Nut had been changed somewhere in the last 50 years, and to my surprise, it was a nut for a Left Handed configuration! Needles to say, the strings weren't fitting in the grooves...

 

I am wondering if anyone here knows the best place to obtain a Nut for this guitar? It has the skinny neck, and 1 9/16 nut. I don't know if it originally came with bone, but I would have thought so, and I would like to keep it as close to original as possible.

 

I have never carved a Nut for a guitar before, and thus don't have the proper tools, and it seems difficult to find any this size online from what I've seen.

Any good resources or ideas are appreciated!

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Any good tech or luthier can make a new nut. its not terribly expensive.

 

 

 

Yes thank you! I don't know a trusted luthier or tech yet, but I guess I will need to search one out. I haven't seen many references to this size Nut in my searches, I was hoping there might be a vintage resource somewhere with a pre-cut slotted Nut, but it doesn't look like it will be that easy :)

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The original wasn't bone, but some nylon-like probably then modern plast material.

This component actually means a quite a lot for the genuine voice of these guitars.

Ask me, cause I know from experimenting with carving 4 wider spaced nuts for my 'new' 1963 J-45 last September.

Ultra-light plastic

Bone

Buf-horn

Only when I got a replica of the old vintage material (from China, believe it or not) the sound found itself again.

Amazed by how big an influence this small thing has.

 

 

Good Luck

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I recently acquired a Right Hand 1967 Southern Jumbo that is in especially clean condition, but as I began to clean it up and restring it, I discovered that the Nut had been changed somewhere in the last 50 years, and to my surprise, it was a nut for a Left Handed configuration! Needles to say, the strings weren't fitting in the grooves...

 

I am wondering if anyone here knows the best place to obtain a Nut for this guitar? It has the skinny neck, and 1 9/16 nut. I don't know if it originally came with bone, but I would have thought so, and I would like to keep it as close to original as possible.

 

I have never carved a Nut for a guitar before, and thus don't have the proper tools, and it seems difficult to find any this size online from what I've seen.

Any good resources or ideas are appreciated!

70's F,

 

Does it have a double pickguard?

 

Would appreciate any photos (I am a lefty)

 

 

 

 

 

 

JC

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The original wasn't bone, but some nylon-like probably then modern plast material.

This component actually means a quite a lot for the genuine voice of these guitars.

Ask me, cause I know from experimenting with carving 4 wider spaced nuts for my 'new' 1963 J-45 last September.

Ultra-light plastic

Bone

Buf-horn

Only when I got a replica of the old vintage material (from China, believe it or not) the sound found itself again.

Amazed by how big an influence this small thing has.

 

 

Good Luck

The small things often mean the most. :)

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Yes thank you! I don't know a trusted luthier or tech yet, but I guess I will need to search one out. I haven't seen many references to this size Nut in my searches, I was hoping there might be a vintage resource somewhere with a pre-cut slotted Nut, but it doesn't look like it will be that easy :)

 

A new nut can be cut from a wider blank, and any competent tech should be able to do that. You are unlikely to find an off-the-shelf-replacement for a 1 9/16" nut. If you can tell us where you are located, someone here may be able to point you in the direction of someone local who might do the job.

 

In 1967, the material used would probably have been some type of hard plastic. I replaced a 1968 plastic 1 9/16" nut with a bone one a number of years ago, and am glad I did. Just a few years ago, I replaced the saddle and pins with bone as well.

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A new nut can be cut from a wider blank, and any competent tech should be able to do that. You are unlikely to find an off-the-shelf-replacement for a 1 9/16" nut. If you can tell us where you are located, someone here may be able to point you in the direction of someone local who might do the job.

 

In 1967, the material used would probably have been some type of hard plastic. I replaced a 1968 plastic 1 9/16" nut with a bone one a number of years ago, and am glad I did. Just a few years ago, I replaced the saddle and pins with bone as well.

 

 

Thanks for the reply! I'm located near Boise Idaho, and I know there is one guy here who is fairly well known named John Bolin, and it sounds like he does some high profile work. I have called and left messages twice but haven't received any reply from him yet.

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The original wasn't bone, but some nylon-like probably then modern plast material.

This component actually means a quite a lot for the genuine voice of these guitars.

Ask me, cause I know from experimenting with carving 4 wider spaced nuts for my 'new' 1963 J-45 last September.

Ultra-light plastic

Bone

Buf-horn

Only when I got a replica of the old vintage material (from China, believe it or not) the sound found itself again.

Amazed by how big an influence this small thing has.

 

 

Good Luck

 

Thanks Em, now that you mention it, I do recall reading somewhere that they used some sort of Nylon. Is the 63 you mention actually built in 63 or a reissue? Only asking because I'm curious if you had the opportunity to hear the original nut's voice before trying the alternate materials, and which one do you think would be nearest to the original voicing properties... Thx!

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Since you’re going to replace it anyway, you could try to recut the slots. Recut the top 3 bass strings then use those shavings to make a super glue gel paste to fill in the other

three. I use the gel because you get more working time.

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Since you’re going to replace it anyway, you could try to recut the slots. Recut the top 3 bass strings then use those shavings to make a super glue gel paste to fill in the other

three. I use the gel because you get more working time.

 

 

Hey thank you for the idea Dave F, I may give that a spin!

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Thanks Em, now that you mention it, I do recall reading somewhere that they used some sort of Nylon. Is the 63 you mention actually built in 63 or a reissue? Only asking because I'm curious if you had the opportunity to hear the original nut's voice before trying the alternate materials, and which one do you think would be nearest to the original voicing properties... Thx!

Definitely the real deal (the whole point). I have several 60's Gibson and they all have/had the nylon-plast.

Check the material in this ad based in Kansas.

 

https://www.ebay.com...scAAOSw38BaWBs-

 

 

Carving nuts is the opposite of rocket-science.

In fact it's related to the earliest craft on earth – making arrowheads, kitchen tools, bone-necklace symbols etc.

Takes a couple of hours - a brave amount of sanding. The hardest part is the spacing-math.

 

It's an exciting challenge, which demands a good share of zen focus.

 

Here are the 3 of the 4 I made in the early fall. As said the nylon went on the guitar. Guess what's what.

 

2017 ~ LUr0M7k.jpg

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Definitely the real deal (the whole point). I have several 60's Gibson and they all have/had the nylon-plast.

Check the material in this ad based in Kansas.

 

https://www.ebay.com...scAAOSw38BaWBs-

 

 

Carving nuts is the opposite of rocket-science.

In fact it's related to the earliest craft on earth – making arrowheads, kitchen tools, bone-necklace symbols etc.

Takes a couple of hours - a brave amount of sanding. The hardest part is the spacing-math.

 

It's an exciting challenge, which demands a good share of zen focus.

 

Here are the 3 of the 4 I made in the early fall. As said the nylon went on the guitar. Guess what's what.

 

2017 ~ LUr0M7k.jpg

 

Ok I'll take a stab at it... I'm guessing the dark one=buffalo, yellowish=bone, and white=plastic?

Did you order the nylon from the e-bay site you referenced?

 

Thanks for sharing the photo!

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Ok I'll take a stab at it... I'm guessing the dark one=buffalo, yellowish=bone, and white=plastic?

Did you order the nylon from the e-bay site you referenced?

Rite ^

 

No ! - ordered a handful of different blanks from here and there.

The lite plast was GB-based and as mentioned I think the nylon came from China.

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