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Request for those changing out their pickups


dbirchett

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If anyone is changing out their pickups for ones that do not use the quick connectors used on the Sheraton, would you please sell me your connectors. Please contact me by email or PM. Thanks,

 

Don

 

Here is a picture of the connectors I am looking for. (Thanks to weeladdie for the picture):

 

epi_pickup_connectors.jpg

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Those are standard connectors available at any Radio Shack store.

 

We went through this topic a while back. They could be Molex (2 pin) or Amp (2pin) or other manufacturer

products such as the automotive line in which you should be able to find something in the automotive

stores.

You could try and bring the p_up into the store to see if the connectors in the bag will physically

fit each other, but chances are you will need to go to a Molex plug or something similar and change

both ends.

 

Epiphone should really publish or have information available on those OEM connectors as

a public service.

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Don' date=' I think a special tool is needed for the insertion/removal of wires in

those connectors (I'm sure I'll be corrected if I'm wrong). Exactly what

are you trying to accomplish?[/quote']

 

If it's a molex style, the pins snap into the plastic or nylon housing. Removing them

does require a special tool that compresses the tang(s) so you can pull the wire out.

I've used small jewelers flat screwdrivers and that works too, but you have to go

around the pin.

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Those are standard connectors available at any Radio Shack store.

 

Radio Shack is one that I had not considered. I was checking at a couple of computer supply stores in the area. The three I checked did not have ones that would work.

 

 

We went through this topic a while back. They could be Molex (2 pin) or Amp (2pin) or other manufacturer

products such as the automotive line in which you should be able to find something in the automotive

stores.

 

You could try and bring the p_up into the store to see if the connectors in the bag will physically

fit each other' date=' but chances are you will need to go to a Molex plug or something similar and change

both ends.

 

Thanks for all of your suggestions. I'm going to take the pickup out again and run up to Radio Shack.

 

Epiphone should really publish or have information available on those OEM connectors as

a public service.[/quote']

 

I contacted Epiphone/Gibson and they of course were less than helpful.

 

These were some of their comments:

 

Epiphone does not have this available as an after-market part. At this time Gibson sells only pre-packaged parts through our Gibson Gear division. All packaged Gibson replacement parts listed online at http://www.gibson.com/en-us/Divisions/Gibson%20Gear/Accessories/Replacement%20Parts/ can only be ordered through an authorized Gibson dealer. You can find dealers online at http://www.gibson.com/Dealers/.

 

For all other replacement parts, we suggest the aftermarket parts suppliers listed below;

 

WD: 1-877-WDMUSIC www.wdmusic.com www.pickguards.com

All Parts: 1-800-327-8942 www.allparts.com

Stewart-McDonald: 1-800-848-2273 www.stewmac.com

 

 

And, in a follow-up:

 

Thank you for contacting Gibson. I would suggest www.stewmac.com. Epiphone does not have part numbers for these items and vendor information is proprietary. Thanks.

 

Don' date=' I think a special tool is needed for the insertion/removal of wires in

those connectors (I'm sure I'll be corrected if I'm wrong). Exactly what

are you trying to accomplish?[/quote']

 

What I am trying to have are pickups that I can easily swap in and out of the guitar. A real plug and play situation. If I had a short length of wire still attached to the connectors, the pickups could be soldered in. That may or may not be a viable situation.

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In MY day, connectors were for wusses.

 

A much better strategy: let's say you have three sets of pickups, and want to have the option of playing your Dot with any of the sets, or combinations of individual pickups.

 

Wimpy solution: install connectors on your Dot, and on each of the pickups.

 

Macho solution: buy 24 Dots, and install one unique pair on each one (or, if you want to go the further step of wiring the variants such as neck/neck or bridge/bridge, 48).

 

Think of how your wiring/f-hole fishing skills will be honed!

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What I am trying to have are pickups that I can easily swap in and out of the guitar. A real plug and play situation. If I had a short length of wire still attached to the connectors' date=' the pickups could be soldered in. That may or may not be a viable situation.

 

[/quote']

 

That's too bad that Gibson/Epiphone can't provide the partno. Obviously it's something that is installed at the factory in China and since Molex is manufactured in China these days, you would need to

contact them or the 1-800 numbers for help. Neither Stew=Mac, nor Allparts nor any

of the other guitar parts online supply these connectors so far.

 

The connectors that are shown in your picture look a lot like the Molex Inertia Lock 3.30 mm wire to wire

system. You would have to call the Molex 1-800 number (1-800-78Molex) for more information on distributors

but Arrow Electronics sell them and so do Avnet and Force Electronics.

The big problem without a specific part no. is that you really don't have a clue of

what type of connector is needed to describe it over the phone.

 

I ended up using molex 4 wire nylon connectors that I found in my local electronics

supply store and these work ok, but all the wires had to be converted over.

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Yep, standard plugs. You can buy an amp style crimping tool in most auto and electronics stores nowdays. Just don't try to use the ones that electricians use or you will flatten the end of the pin and not get a good contact. Those are for wire splices. The one you want for Amp pins has a shape at the bottom of the crimp that looks a little like a lower case "m" turned upside down. Molex might work, but I think I'd use Amp for a guitar. The connection IMHO is stronger and will withstand more plug/unplug cycles. Molex is convenient and I carry both types in my van, but my vote for this application is AMP.

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OK. so let me get this straight...you're planning on having more than one set

of pickups' date=' with connectors, that you'll be using for multiple swaps.[/quote']

 

BINGO!

 

I'm probably making more out of this than I need to but I just want something I can use to try new pickups until I find the ones that really set my heart a-flutter, so to speak.

 

I went to Radio Shack. No luck. They referred me to Batteries+, a company specializing in batteries for everything. They had an identical plug but it was slightly too large in one direction. They referred me to a larger Batteries+ that supposedly had an entire wall of connectors. When I got there, the guy didn't know what I was talking about. Grrrr!

 

I went to Auto Zone, a decent auto parts house and they did not have anything. Yesterday I went to a computer parts specialty store, they referred me to a computer cable and wiring firm and then to Fry's Electronics. So far I am 0 for 7 and am in danger of being sent down to the minors.

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In MY day' date=' connectors were for wusses.

 

A much better strategy: let's say you have three sets of pickups, and want to have the option of playing your Dot with any of the sets, or combinations of individual pickups.

 

Wimpy solution: install connectors on your Dot, and on each of the pickups.

 

Macho solution: buy 24 Dots, and install one unique pair on each one (or, if you want to go the further step of wiring the variants such as neck/neck or bridge/bridge, 48).

 

Think of how your wiring/f-hole fishing skills will be honed! [/quote']

 

Wuss. wimp, yup, that's me.

 

The biggest problem with the macho solution is that I have had enough trouble convincing the wife that its OK to have my 8th guitar (actually I have 9 but the Del Rey is on the block).

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That's too bad that Gibson/Epiphone can't provide the partno. Obviously it's something that is installed at the factory in China and since Molex is manufactured in China these days' date=' you would need to

contact them or the 1-800 numbers for help. Neither Stew=Mac, nor Allparts nor any

of the other guitar parts online supply these connectors so far.

 

The connectors that are shown in your picture look a lot like the Molex Inertia Lock 3.30 mm wire to wire

system. You would have to call the Molex 1-800 number (1-800-78Molex) for more information on distributors

but Arrow Electronics sell them and so do Avnet and Force Electronics.

The big problem without a specific part no. is that you really don't have a clue of

what type of connector is needed to describe it over the phone.

 

I ended up using molex 4 wire nylon connectors that I found in my local electronics

supply store and these work ok, but all the wires had to be converted over.

[/quote']

 

The guitar was actually made by Unsung, in Korea. I have emailed them but have not heard anything and, judging from Gibson/Epiphone's responses to me, Unsung may be contractually prohibited from responding to me.

 

I appreciate your efforts to walk me through finding them but as I go to the websites, I am totally lost. When I put things in the search window, it tells me they have no products matching my description.

 

Any further suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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Buy whatever jack which can fit inside the guitar' date=' replace male and female sides.

That way you'll be much easier off.[/quote']

 

Makes sense. There have got to be a kajillion 2-conductor connectors out there. Seems like every piece of electronics has two or three.

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Yep' date=' standard plugs. You can buy an amp style crimping tool in most auto and electronics stores nowdays. contact. Molex might work, but I think I'd use Amp for a guitar. The connection IMHO is stronger and will withstand more plug/unplug cycles. Molex is convenient and I carry both types in my van, but my vote for this application is AMP.[/quote']

 

I agree Dave, that the Amp ( maybe Molex has one) crimp tool is the way to go, and

I have used them in the past with the large telecommunications company that I used to work

for...but these crimp tools are fairly expensive for using once or twice for a pickup

connector. Finding Molex is easier than Amp (at least up in this neck of the woods) and ordering

online costs more for shipping than the cost of the connectors.

 

The way I did it on my guitars was to carefully crimp the individual p_up wire first with

a pair of needle nose (mechanical connection), then soldering the wires)on the molex pins.

I keep a wiring diagram/manual for each one of my customized guitars.

Once you have standardized the colour code (blk/red/wht/grn) against the "polarized end" of the connectors,

you just push them in until the tangs seat inside the nylon shell and that's all there is to it.

 

As far as strength for plug/unplug cycles, I'm not into doing that many unplug cycles, but you just have to pull

the connectors apart gently and not tug on the fine wires themselves and they should be ok for a few

cycles. I have spare pins and should one wire break, I can extract the broken pin and resolder the wire to a

new pin if necessary.

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