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Todays budding guitarist-(continued) Acoustic.

#1 User is offline   pauloon 

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 02:31 AM

How many of us started out on acoustic (nowadays kids will go straight to electric).....and Keith Richards has always maintained '' anyone who wants to become a great electric guitarist must also develop skill on an acoustic''......

I started on acoustic......and i'm not a great electric guitarist :( ...........nor a great acoustic guitarist.:( :( .

#2 User is offline   krock 

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 03:46 AM

View Postpauloon, on 01 March 2014 - 02:31 AM, said:

How many of us started out on acoustic (nowadays kids will go straight to electric).....and Keith Richards has always maintained '' anyone who wants to become a great electric guitarist must also develop skill on an acoustic''......

I started on acoustic......and i'm not a great electric guitarist :( ...........nor a great acoustic guitarist.:( :( .


I started 10 years ago on an electric and have never bought an acoustic. I'd quite like one though, just need to do my house move first
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#3 User is offline   Jimi Mac 

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 04:32 AM

I started on acoustic and it almost stopped my playing entirely.

It was a Yamaha from a local guitar/music store and I found it very hard to play as a beginner and was sure my hands weren't good enough/strong enough/big enough to be a guitarist.

In fact the whole time I had it I never really learned to play anything and I made atrocious noise with it that never amounted to anything. It wasn't until it was traded toward an electric that increased my interest and affinity toward guitar. I'm not a folk guy, I'm a Blues guy, and while alot of guys play acoustic or delta Blues on an acoustic, to be honest I can't stand the sound of acoustic guitar Blues and it kills my interest immediately...

I think if you get good on an acoustic you can play anything, but it takes extreme effort and probably well above average talent and way above average determination and sticktuitiveness to become fluent and exceptional as an acoustic guitarist...

With The likes of Tommy Emmanuel playing one, it's been done as good as it can be done, so it's hard for me to even begin to develop any interest in acoustic playing, even if I think Tommy Emmanuel is probably the worlds best guitarist period...



It just don't get any better than that!!!

But to me what I want to hear, what I hear in my head, and what drives my passion is electric guitar blues with a British tone edge...

I have an acoustic now that I never play, but my daughter does and she's very good with it...



If you haven't subscribed to Tommy Emmanuel's YouTube channel, Do it!!!

He is singularly sublime!


-Jimi Mac

#4 User is offline   quapman 

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 09:42 AM

Started on a cheap acoustic.
My brother and I went through 5 or 6 Mel Bay books with those things.
Our teacher laughed and called them cigar boxes.
I think he just wanted to sell us guitars.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
My Guitars:

Electric
2011 - Gibson Les Paul Classic Custom
1987 - Hamer Chaparral Custom(USA)
1987 - Hamer Slammer Series(Korean)
2001 - Squier Strat (Indonesia)
2006 - Ibanez AF-75 (Korean)
1990 - Washburn XS-4 Bass


Acoustic
2011 - Gibson J-45 Standard
1999 - Takamine G-330s
1985 - Yamaha FG-420
1982 - Lys Classical

I purchased all but the Strat, Ibanez and the Lys new off the shelf.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

#5 User is offline   surfpup 

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 07:01 PM

I began on acoustic (steel string) and have stuck with it. In some ways acoustic and electric are separate beasts, but they also compliment each other nicely. Two sides of the same coin, perhaps. Most of the solid rhythm players I know play acoustic. It really does help to tighten one's rhythm. And if you can't play a solid rhythm you will never be a good lead player in a band situation.

The acoustic guitar also is a great strength builder. I can do nearly all of the same bends I do on electric guitar on the acoustic guitar (though the fingers do start to hurt more rapidly).

Plus with the acoustic, you can easily sit down and entertain folks (and/or yourself) for hours. Try getting someone to listen to you play solo electric guitar for an hour or two. [biggrin]

The only real disadvantage I can see is that playing light strings on the electric is sometimes difficult for me due to the heavy grip that acoustic playing develops. If you want to be a real light-touched shredder, the acoustic could be a detriment. Other than that. I see it was a plus for one's playing.
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#6 User is offline   milod 

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 11:30 AM

I'd agree with Richards in principle.

Going back to "the olden days" whence he and I both arise as pickers of sorts, one quickly realized that an acoustic guitar is an instrument of one part, where an electric is an instrument of two parts plus various connectors.

Why is that important? It's simply that there are countless ways of getting differing sounds, tones, whatever, from an acoustic whether steel or nylon strung. An electric player from the beginning tends toward using the amp and various "connecting" equipment to change the tone rather than technique.

On the other hand...

I think those selling acoustic guitars with heavy strings and high action, then "teaching" their victims to play because "acoustic guitars should have heavy strings," should be hanged.

I've come across only too many kids who quit guitar simply because it hurt too much. A simple setup with a set of 9-42 or similar will be enough to make it no different from an electric guitar - except with even greater attention to the connection of technique and tone that one might easily hear. Get the kid (regardless of age) playing first, then let him or her make decisions on a future style and instrument. They may or may not continue pickin', but at least they no longer have the excuse that they're not masochists.

m

#7 User is offline   pauloon 

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 11:57 AM

All valid points made,....reading between the ''Keith Richards'' lines,i always thought it more likely you would pick up good rhythm ''chops'' if you start on an acoustic.....I know a few people who can play ''mean licks'',but ask them to strum a blues in E ....WHAT!??!!

Never hurt B.B. King mind.

#8 User is offline   charlie brown 

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 02:23 PM

I wish I played "acoustic" guitar, more often. But, I was put off, as Milod mentioned,
by an early experience, with a very cheap model, and terribly heavy strings. Still,
every time I play my old '54 J-160E, I wish it used it more. Even though, it's not the
best "acoustic" sounding guitar, it still gets me by. Played a Martin OOO-28EC, and
absolutely fell in love with it. Problem is, I don't have that kind of "scratch" laying
around, these days, or I would have bought it, on the spot. Another "Bucket List" guitar
is a Guild USA 12-string! It just never ends, seemingly. :rolleyes: [biggrin]

CB

#9 User is offline   milod 

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 02:44 PM

CB...

All kidding aside, look into a couple Epis... EL00 pro and PR5e. Both AE. I just picked up an EL00 to see if I'd like that shape that's quite different from my past pickin'. The PR5e sounds as good as anything through an AE board. Both are quite inexpensive; the EL in theory may have better quality 'cuz of a solid top; the PR5e is pretty decent for anything but pounding with a flatpick regardless of lam top.

The reason I got the EL is to try both the shape and the shape with a 24 1/2 inch scale. Gibson has a similar piece for 1,100 US more - but it's enough different from what I've played I figured I'd give it a try at the lower price tag.

Or for a really inexpensive cheapie that's fun to play, the Epi PR4e that comes at $200 complete to AE and a little AE amp, low-end gig bag, etc. It has the 25 1/2 scale that I don't care much for, but the little "cheapie" feels pretty good regardless.

I got mine super cheap 'cuz the amp didn't work. I put on Zebra 9-42 and it worked quite well for a batch of gigs with little kids on stage - and if it was destroyed I wasn't out that much cash. Oddly it sounded as good as most parlor/travel guitars if you didn't beat on it. Gave it to a young friend who was moving with hubbie and new munchkin. (Now it's 3 munchkins and I think not much pickin' time.)

I figure each guitar brings something to the party. As with friends or vehicles, one quickly learns to treat each as an individual to get the most out of the relationship.

<grin> m

#10 User is offline   Izzy 

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 04:33 PM

I started on acoustic nylon. That made me want steel, but that Aria steel was hell and I decided to just get an electric.

As soon as I got a GOOD acoustic I knew THAT would be my thing. Yes, electric is easier to play and I love getting the distortion but a steel guitar is just...classic. I love Ani DiFranco and watching all the Mtv Unplugged artists who were famous for their electric playing go back to basics...watching those artists rock out on acoustic...yeah, I'd pick acoustic over electric every time. What if your power goes out, man? Nothing better than an acoustic [thumbup]
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#11 User is offline   Tman 

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 04:48 PM

I started on electric and didn't play an acoustic until I bought my first one at age 50. Now I love it and can't do without my J-45 which is currently my go to guitar.

#12 User is offline   milod 

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 05:02 PM

Tman & Izzy...

I almost certainly have more guitars than I should have - although not as many as I want - but the one's I've picked up most since last October's devastating Northern Plains blizzard have been two of my archtops 175 size and the little Epi Pr5e.

Yeah, I've got square and slope dreads, but the smaller guitar flattop or archtop, even with my "let's play electrified" strings simply feel right. Trying out the Epi EL00 Pro is an inexpensive tryout, $400 with hard case, for the $1,800 Gibbie American Eagle LG2 which is an all-wood instrument of the same shape and shorter scale. But the shape isn't quite like the 175 overall dimensions that I find most comfortable at this point. As soon as I have time to restring the new Epi, we'll see...

Izzy, I started on nylon too. Did some Flamenco in those days too. There are some real advantages to the size - which is also quite close to a 175 - and short scale. Some of the newer nylons have a somewhat narrower nut to accommodate steel players. There is a closer physical association with the guitar for the left hand with nylon unless you play with a flatpick a la Willie N.

Oh, whatta I do with the big boxes? Every now and then arises a gig or jam that is all acoustic and requires a bit more acoustic amplitude. Otherwise for me, they ain't so comfy. Since I'm playing the steel strings with virtually the same technique as nylon, both hands, the smaller boxes simply make it far more effortless.

The semis and the board? They sit in their cases awaiting the potential of a band gig that would have enough volume to bring feedback from one of the full hollow archtops. Ain't so likely around here now, at least for a grouchy old man.

m

#13 User is offline   charlie brown 

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 07:17 PM

You know...I had a recent Epiphone "Inspired by Texan" that I really liked!
Unfortunately, I fell in love with Gibson "SG's," after a 40 year hiatus,
and traded it in, as a part of one of my deals. I might just get one of
those, again. :-k Really nice guitar, for not a lot of money.

CB

#14 User is offline   milod 

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 07:47 PM

Izzy...

Got thinking about your statement that "electric is easier to play."

I think that's bunk because of the "you gotta use heavy strings" perspective one finds on various acoustic guitar forums.

And yeah, folks like Mother Maybelle played what looked like bass piano strings on their guitars in the pre-electric era and continued their whole career.

I use DR Zebra 9-42 on my fingerpicking acoustic-electrics. I can flatpick 'em too, although with a different technique than what I use on the big boxes for old time or 'grass.

Depends on what you're doing with an acoustic whether you want this or that kinda strings, just as that's true on various electrics.

I will say that too few folks consider changing their technique among different guitars and string choices and that's a problem.

m

#15 User is offline   quapman 

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 07:58 PM

Acoustic or electric.

I don't know,, they are 2 completely different animals.

I could never live without either. I love them both dearly.


Especially since getting my J-45.
It's simply an amazing instrument.
And I confess,, it's quality is far beyond my abilities but it's mine
so "screw you guys,, I"m goin home"...
;)



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
My Guitars:

Electric
2011 - Gibson Les Paul Classic Custom
1987 - Hamer Chaparral Custom(USA)
1987 - Hamer Slammer Series(Korean)
2001 - Squier Strat (Indonesia)
2006 - Ibanez AF-75 (Korean)
1990 - Washburn XS-4 Bass


Acoustic
2011 - Gibson J-45 Standard
1999 - Takamine G-330s
1985 - Yamaha FG-420
1982 - Lys Classical

I purchased all but the Strat, Ibanez and the Lys new off the shelf.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

#16 User is offline   pauloon 

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 01:21 AM

This could be the way to go for those wanting to come ''into the light''......(having never played acoustic)

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#17 User is offline   Jimi Mac 

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 04:26 AM

View Postpauloon, on 03 March 2014 - 11:57 AM, said:

All valid points made,....reading between the ''Keith Richards'' lines,i always thought it more likely you would pick up good rhythm ''chops'' if you start on an acoustic.....I know a few people who can play ''mean licks'',but ask them to strum a blues in E ....WHAT!??!!

Never hurt B.B. King mind.


Amen!!!
-Jimi Mac

#18 User is offline   milod 

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 11:17 AM

Pauloon...

I've played a cupla variations of that design - cigar box sound acoustic and dunno about electric. I think a "real" one or the other is a better idea.

But I think one problem for a beginner is that he/she doesn't have a clue. In fact, I'm not sure that any of us could do all that well helping the beginner on that first buying trip and first week of picking since so much is psychological.

There's also the point of how one proposes to learn guitar. I think some "lessons" emphasize rock lead and others emphasize country/'grass/folkie rhythm so... again, what's the beginner looking for. Also, has he/she played any music before? If not, I think an acoustic with light strings is the better solution.

m

#19 User is offline   pauloon 

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 11:31 AM

Fair point...I have a couple of those fender '''coustic things...they are neither one OR the other really....I still like them though.....but the rub is....you can make it sound LIKE an Acoustic....you can make it sound LIKE an electric...but they really sound like neither....

And that's what I like.....something I can't get from my acoustics.....something I can't get from my electrics.....

Still....whatever I use....those ''bum'' still sound like ''bum'' notes......

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