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Recommendations on paint chip repair


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Welcome here, and sorry for that damage, George.

 

Although for a skilled luthier nitro finish repairs are not that complicated on principal, it looks like there was some wood filler required which means stripping the finish down in a large area. Building up a burst same as it was before is next to impossible, so the only perfect solution would be a complete refinishing of the body, and perhaps the neck, too.

 

In case she came that way, do what Staninator said, and in any other case it will depend on how much of a compromise you're able to live with. Anyway, the damage won't affect tone, but I guess you already know that.

 

Good luck, mate!

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If you just bought it (and it was like that when you did) and can still return it, I'd be taking it back ASAP.

 

I bought it like that at the local GC store. Oddly, I found that it gave the guitar added character and I was able to get the guitar discounted as it was "blemished." Other than the blemish, the guitar is beautiful and it sounds great.

 

it looks like there was some wood filler required which means stripping the finish down in a large area. Building up a burst same as it was before is next to impossible, so the only perfect solution would be a complete refinishing of the body, and perhaps the neck, too.

 

Thanks for the insight! Perhaps the image might over exaggerate the damage. It doesn't appear the wood has been gouged into. But I'm not looking for perfect, simply a solution that would prevent the "cuticle" from causing premature aging.

 

the damage won't affect tone

 

So true. I play it through a Blues DeVille 212 and it sounds juicy! Awesome little gig rig for the clubs and studio!

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I bought it like that at the local GC store. Oddly, I found that it gave the guitar added character and I was able to get the guitar discounted as it was "blemished." Other than the blemish, the guitar is beautiful and it sounds great.

 

 

 

Thanks for the insight! Perhaps the image might over exaggerate the damage. It doesn't appear the wood has been gouged into. But I'm not looking for perfect, simply a solution that would prevent the "cuticle" from causing premature aging.

 

 

 

So true. I play it through a Blues DeVille 212 and it sounds juicy! Awesome little gig rig for the clubs and studio!

 

If you're happy with it and got it at a good price by all means keep it. But I'd go so far to say "blemished" is a bit of an understatement. I've had friends get wicked deals because of a dent in the finish, but actually taking paint off really takes it to the extreme. If you're fine with the paint being chipped and just want to seal area I'm sure you could get it filled with some nitro for not too much and you'd still get to keep the character.

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That's the info I wanted to gather from the forums. What are some good touch up techniques? I've seen some resources but I wanted to ask the forum folks.

 

I wouldn't have the slightest idea. I've never dealt with nitro or tried to do any touch ups on it. For something as serious as yours I'd definitely take it to someone with some experience.

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Hello, this is first post here and thanks for any and all help! I just purchased this gorgeous 2015 Les Paul Studio and I have this chip in the paint. I was hoping to find out what you folks would do in this instance. Once again, thanks for any recommendations!

 

While those nicks are not "all that bad"....I have an 11 year old LP jr.... without "nicks that bad"....Not sure what to say...???

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  • 4 weeks later...

I would get some Nitro, and fingernail polish brush. Just keep applying to the inside of the damage. Don't apply ANY on the surrounding area. I could take MANY coats to bring the divot up to the finish level, but Your patience will be rewarded. In th en, You will have a character mark much less prone to cracking and crazing.

 

Just like mny chicks dig a character scar, a little mark on an otherwise perfect axe can be cool. Just remember. Patience Luke. Preservation in place of renovation can be cool. Keep the paint completely off of the surrounding area. I am not a pro, but I have preserved guitars with minor dings for my friends and myself. It will be cool Bro.

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that looks like a drop and fill with some buffing etc.. not too hard to do at all. ajay pretty much nails it.

 

but if you don't want to tackle this yourself any repair guy who also does finish repair can make that almost disappear. the harder part of the process will be matching the color of the finish on the edge of the burst. it's doable and from some similar repairs I've had done in the past, it wont be too expensive.

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ajay's method is probably the best way to go.

 

I've actually used nail polish with good results for chips in solid colors. I touched up a dark red 1983 Aria Pro II, and my 2005 cherry SG by filing chips to a level slightly above the original finish (several thin coats), then wet-sanding and buffing... Looks very good, and costs almost nothing.msp_biggrin.gif Between my wife, daughter, & granddaughters, I have access to a vast array of colors!

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  • 3 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

The folks at the local Rite Aid are accustomed to seeing me in there with a guitar matching guitars to nail polish.

I drop fill, sand down to #2000, then hit it with a buffing wheel.

If you don't mind the dings, you could just use a couple of drops of super glue to avoid further flaking.

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There's two types on damage to that Studio. One is a surface ding. The other is the complete removal of all coating over the wood. Maybe use fingernail polish on one and Stewmac's patch on the other.

I might even ignore everything except the spot that goes all the way to the wood. That isn't a one size fits all situation you have there. I wouldn't proceed onto the light dings until I was happy with the major section.

 

I still think you ended up the beneficiary of that ding. It was your lucky break.

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