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J45 12 Fret


jw3571
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There has been some discussion on the new J45 12 fret model that Wildwood Guitars got in. I'm debating pulling the trigger on one but won't be able to play it first. The Gibson's i currently have are an Original Jumbo 1934 reissue, SJ200 1938 reissue, and two hummingbirds, one in maple the other in mahogany. Would there be too much overlap between what i have and the 12 fret J45? It looks nearly identical to the OJ, do people think the j45 would be a fairly mellow guitar? I seem to like guitars have great bass and feel more alive if that makes sense. Opinions?

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1.8 Neck Width, with a "V" profile. I don't mind the width, but I don't think Ive ever experienced a "V" profile Gibson. If its not shallow might be a good fit. I like thick necks.

 

 

If it's a 1930's style Gibson V-neck, it's a fairly soft V that's pretty comfortable. Definitely not skinny. That's what I have on my L-OO Legend, but the nut on that is 1 3/4".

 

For the OP, I don't see a lot of tonal overlap with what you have. The OJ should have a deep untapered body, which gives a fairly different balance compared to the tapered J-45 body. I haven't looked at the 12-fret J-45, but it should have a shifted soundhole and maybe back-shifted top braces as well. Should be a very different animal from a "straight" J-45.

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Definitely a degenerate. One question on the neck i don't fully understand. When you talk of a "shallow" neck what does that exactly mean? Does that just mean it's a thinner neck with a v profile?

 

Great bass and a lively feeling response? You are apparently a musical degenerate with tastes comparable to mine! I believe the 12-fretter might do you proud☺

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yes Wildwood Guitars puts in the spec list the Neck Depth at the first and ninth frets. Distance from top of fretboard to back of neck. It is VERY helpful for those of us who desire/require specific neck depths. It makes me really appreciate Wildwood Guitars because it shows they really want you to get what "you want" and not just "selling" to you. A neck with a first fret Neck Depth of .79 vs .93 is often the differences... quite significant! I prefer first fret depth of .89-.93 & Modified V or V ;-)

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I'very got a bunch of Gibson slopes, including a J-45 Legend, J-45 TV, AJ, Short scale maple AJ, SJ TV, Fuller's J-35, etc. I also have a 12-fret Rosewood Stage Deluxe, and a close cousin, the Epiphone Masterbilt AJ-500 RC, which is a 12-fret rosewood model, as well. I find a 12-fret model has more depth and body in the low end without overwhelming the articulation of the bass strings (particularly my Stage Deluxe). They are also noticeably powerful guitars. Remember, the bridge is shifted to the fattest part of the soundboard on a 12-fret guitar (and the bracing changed to accommodate it) so the top is motivated differently than a 14-fret. I also find a 12-fret guitar easier to play. The strings feel slinkier.

 

I am replying from my phone so sorry for the fat-fingered and auto correct typos and for the brevity of my reply.

 

Red 333

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Of course, there really was not a historical model that had these specs -- not even the overall footprint.

 

We have several vintage guitars with similar layouts.

 

 

 

big12s.jpg

 

There are Martins on the left -- late 60s BRW -- and two mid 30s Gibsons on the right, RSSD and RSRD. The one in the center front is an 1995 Almctantz.

 

The one that would have very similar specs to a 12-ret J-45 is the one in the back on the right. It has the body specs of the Js -- AJ, J-35, J-45 etc. -- but 12 frets. This one copied a 39 J-35 body -- built by Randy Wood.

 

The tension on the strings on this setup is less, so it plays lighter. Since this one is braced for studio work, I can't comment on how that would compare for sound.

 

2010RWa_zpsnm6qrqvl.jpg

 

Best,

 

-Tom

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... I also find a 12-fret guitar easier to play. The strings feel slinkier. ...

 

I am replying from my phone so sorry for the fat-fingered and auto correct typos and for the brevity of my reply.

 

Red 333

 

If you mean less tension, like a shorter scale, be aware that a 12 fret design is independent of scale length. If you meant something else, my apologies for stepping into your post.

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I was writing about the my admittedly subjective experience of what you might call string compliance. That's what I meant by slinky. I am aware of the relationshiprior between string weight, pitch, and scale length.

 

The perception of compliance is not fully understood by builders (Bob Benedetto did some notable experiments) but experience leads me to believe that break angle, saddle height, and the total length of the string, including the non-speaking length, play a part.

 

Red 333

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I was writing about the my admittedly subjective experience of what you might call string compliance. That's what I meant by slinky. I am aware of the relationshiprior between string weight, pitch, and scale length.

 

The perception of compliance is not fully understood by builders (Bob Benedetto did some notable experiments) but experience leads me to believe that break angle, saddle height, and the total length of the string, including the non-speaking length, play a part.

 

Red 333

 

Interesting!

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