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Rest in Peace-Trini Lopez


QuestionMark
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Those of us old enough to remember, remember that Trini Lopez was way ahead of his time in the early part of the 60s with amplifying his guitar and rocking up folk songs like "If I Had a Hammer" and "Lemon Tree", long before anyone else had the nerve or the idea to try to do so.  He also had a Gibson guitar model named after him (with a double cutaway) and was a pioneer in insisting he retain his ethnic name of Trini Lopez rather than caving in to his record company wanting him to make his name generic.  Plus, he had best selling records to boot.  He passed away from COVID-19.  RIP Trini, you and your music rocked.  May your memory be a blessing to all.

 

QM aka "Jazzman" Jeff

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It was a high honor to produce-arrange-conceive Trini's album TRINI LOPEZ LEGACY: MY TEXAS ROOTS with Trini----and we formed a studio combo of Trini and Jesse Lopez and me to get the Trini 3-piece combo vibe that we love. I've always loved the Gibson Trini Models, and I did everything I could through our album release to promote those guitars: featured photos of the guitars in the album artwork, feature articles at the time with Vintage Guitar mag and also a nice feature at the album's release with Gibson.com. I hope everyone will seek out the the rarity release TRINI LOPEZ LEGACY: MY TEXAS ROOTS. Trini and Jesse and I put our hearts and souls into the album and the songs. It's sort of unbelievable also when you go back in time to even the 1970s---when through 1971 there TWO----can you believe it-----TWO separate Trini Lopez Gibson Models. Also-----there were TRINI RESTAURANTS in the 1970s-----where a lot of us had our very first sour cream enchiladas. Trini Lopez means a lot: in guitars, in records, in music, in culture.  More on our recording history at www.artgreenhaw.com     

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2 hours ago, fortyearspickn said:

A protege of sorts - of Frank Sinatra and Buddy Holly.   We sure have a rich musical history.  I wonder who the greats are that are coming up today that our grandchildren will look back upon with fondness.  A tough business - not for the faint of heart.  He had a rich life.  RIP. 

Music is so different now. We got Pro Tools and Auto Tune, and people who are considered musicians who play a turntable. Album sales mean nothing anymore, if they ever did. Back in the day you had to go out and buy a record at a store, and you only knew it was coming out if you read about it or hear it on the radio. Now Amazon lets you know months in advance when something is coming out. Now the instant its out I can listen to it for free, or for almost nothing at all on a streaming service.

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4 hours ago, Sgt. Pepper said:

Music is so different now. We got Pro Tools and Auto Tune, and people who are considered musicians who play a turntable. Album sales mean nothing anymore, if they ever did. Back in the day you had to go out and buy a record at a store, and you only knew it was coming out if you read about it or hear it on the radio. Now Amazon lets you know months in advance when something is coming out. Now the instant its out I can listen to it for free, or for almost nothing at all on a streaming service.

Savour the  history of our past as you know it.   Its diminishing quickly.  

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