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Hot water tanks anyone?


Gilliangirl

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There's a very small puddle on the floor of the basement this afternoon. I discovered that the leak is coming from this white plastic hose that is connected to the tank. It has a slip of paper attached to it that says something about valves and waterways and draining. I have never done anything with it before. As far as I know the hot water has been fine. Should I be worried? If I have to get someone out on New Years eve/day, I'll need to get a second mortgage on the house just to pay for it :-

 

Anyone know anything about hot water tanks? I've lived in the house for 7 years and didn't know I was supposed to drain anything?

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Seven years is about right on age the tanks are usually guaranteed for 5 years so they don't last much longer at least not in the Southwest deserts but we have hard water here. If the water is coming from inside the metal outside housing it's probably a leak in the tank that will require replacement. you could get lucky and have it leaking at a fixture or the P&T valve but at seven years sorry it's probably the tank like I said five year warranty so there designed t last about three days over the warranty period.

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Seven years is about right on age the tanks are usually guaranteed for 5 years so they don't last much longer at least not in the Southwest deserts but we have hard water here. If the water is coming from inside the metal outside housing it's probably a leak in the tank that will require replacement. you could get lucky and have it leaking at a fixture or the P&T valve but at seven years sorry it's probably the tank like I said five year warranty so there designed t last about three days over the warranty period.

 

:- Figures! I was just about to negotiate a deal on a used SUV. Now this. That's always the way. Sheesh! The leak is coming from a white hose attached to the tank. It is definitely a valve something-rather becuase it says that right on it. It's a very slow leak, so far. Thanks Retro

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They will last longer than 7 years if you empty them every year to get the calcium deposits and sediments out of the tanks. Both the hot water tanks have been running flawlessly since 1994.

Uh oh' date=' we have really hard water in Calgary and I have not done this. [biggrin

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Seven years is about right on age the tanks are usually guaranteed for 5 years so they don't last much longer at least not in the Southwest deserts but we have hard water here. If the water is coming from inside the metal outside housing it's probably a leak in the tank that will require replacement. you could get lucky and have it leaking at a fixture or the P&T valve but at seven years sorry it's probably the tank like I said five year warranty so there designed t last about three days over the warranty period.

 

Ut oh... my water heater is 30 years old!

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it's not hard to replace and they're only about $20 at Home Depot or whatever you have up there. You have to turn the burner off (or just pilot light at least) drain the tank, unscrew the valve (it takes a big adjustable wrench, and sometimes a cheater bar), install the new valve and refill the tank. I used to have to do it about every 5 years when I lived in NM.

 

It works like this (crummy website but it has pictures): http://www.masterplumber.net/warer_heater_relief.htm

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Why me? Why Lord why? Why me? It's New Years Eve and I just want to relax.

 

Lord: Oh but Karen, you wanted to be a home owner, remember?

 

Karen: Yes, but how unfair of you to throw that in my face on New Years Eve

 

Lord: Karen, go pour yourself a Bailey's Irish Cream and call the plumber

 

Karen: Okay Lord, that sounds like a great idea, for more reasons than one.

 

(Okay I know Lord would never tell me to drink Bailey's but I made that part up myself)

 

Thanks Duane, and Flying for the responses. I'm calling in the pro's to deal with it

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Why me? Why Lord why? Why me? It's New Years Eve and I just want to relax.

 

Lord: Oh but Karen' date=' you wanted to be a home owner, remember?

 

Karen: Yes, but how unfair of you to throw that in my face on New Years Eve

 

Lord: Karen, go pour yourself a Bailey's Irish Cream and call the plumber

 

Karen: Okay Lord, that sounds like a great idea, for more reasons than one.

 

(Okay I know Lord would never tell me to drink Bailey's but I made that part up myself)

 

Thanks Duane, and Flying for the responses. I'm calling in the pro's to deal with it [/quote']

 

LOL!!![biggrin]

 

Wait till it comes time to replace the roof[blink] ...... Mine cost $17k two years ago[crying]

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Another thing to check is your household water pressure.

 

In many areas the city water pressure is higher than you want it to be in the house. In this case, the main incoming line needs a pressure reduction valve or regulator so you don't blow fittings, hoses or valves that aren't designed to take that pressure. These regulators wear out.

 

That was the problem in my place the last time I saw water leaking out of the blow-off valve in my water heater. There's usually a metal ring around the valve that is marked with the blow-off pressure, usually something like 80psi.

 

Most plumbers should have a pressure gauge they can attach to any threaded faucet like a utility sink or washing machine hook-up to easily check pressure. Or you should be able to find one at a plumber's supply for $15 or so. Don't bother with Home Depot or Lowe's, they won't have one.

 

While it shouldn't hurt to swap out the blow-off valve, it may only be a symptom of the real problem. A new valve may hold a bit more pressure but meanwhile if your system pressure is too high, you run a greater risk of ruptured fittings and hoses elsewhere.

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"Ah' date=' it's just a little pressure relief valve, eh? That'll be threehunnertandeleventytwofifty, plus the trip charge, tax, parts, handling, dealer prep,...."

 

 

Good luck, and may you have a great New Year's Eve despite the plumbing issue![/quote']

 

Nah, even with the markup for the plumber the valve shouldn't be more than $35 (it's 18 at Home Depot) and it shouldn't be more than 1 hour of work for the plumber (it only takes about 15 minutes total to change the valve) So max cost maybe $120?

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If its on the bottom of the Tank its the Drain valve and its most likely plastic.

 

Just tighten it some more but it will just leak again.

 

The valve up high "Do not mess with" It's the High Pressure Relief valve

 

and it is put on every hot water tank to prevent the tank from blowing-up

 

or Shotting through the roof of the House.

 

The Drain Valve can Always be capped and has the Same threads as any

 

household garden hose

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Karen...

 

May the relief you feel when it's fixed be great... and the Bailey's smooth and cool...

 

We're just lucky we've folks here who know something of this stuff.

 

m

Ain't that the truth!

 

Thank you everyone for the info. It is greatly appreciated. If my repair skills were matched to the type of dwelling I should occupy' date=' I'd be living in a cardboard box. Corrigated of course! [cool

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