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F hole plugs for casino


lengle1981

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Try a decent sized (2X4) piece of balsa wood, cut down to fit snuggly,

between the inside top, and back of the guitar, at about the bridge position,

or slightly behind. Maybe even between the pickups...You can check on

which gives the best result, prior to adding adhesive (usually costumer's

"prosthetic adhesive," works best), for a more "permanent" positioning.

You can (easily) remove, or reposition, the block, with that adhesive,

without damaging the inside of the guitar. With that approach, there's

no visible indication that anything's been done, at all. Yet, it should

be as effective, if not more so, than a "F" hole plug. And, a LOT less

expensive.

 

Good Luck,

 

CB

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Try a decent sized (2X4) piece of balsa wood, cut down to fit snuggly,

between the inside top, and back of the guitar, at about the bridge position,

or slightly behind. Maybe even between the pickups...You can check on

which gives the best result, prior to adding adhesive (usually costumer's

"prosthetic adhesive," works best), for a more "permanent" positioning.

You can (easily) remove, or reposition, the block, with that adhesive,

without damaging the inside of the guitar. With that approach, there's

no visible indication that anything's been done, at all. Yet, it should

be as effective, if not more so, than a "F" hole plug. And, a LOT less

expensive.

 

Good Luck,

 

CB

 

Have you tried this?

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Yeah, in MY Casino! [biggrin] No appreciable change in weight, either. [thumbup]

 

Some guys stuff rolled up socks, or some other fabric, inside. But, they can

end up moving around, on you. The Balsa block with the adhesive, stays put,

until/uless YOU move or remove it.

 

CB

 

Without sounding stupid, I don't know exactly get how you've done it but sounds like its worked

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Without sounding stupid, I don't know exactly get how you've done it but sounds like its worked

 

Just takes some patience, and initiative. A willingness to "experiment" a bit, as well.

It's not difficult, really. But, some "trial and error" may be required, to find the

best placement, in your own instrument. You might even have to use a couple or 3 blocks.

My own, has 2...one slightly behind the bridge, and one placed between the pickups. Other

folks, have used a few as 1, and as many as 3-4, dending on their particular instrument,

and...the actual feedback reduction "goal" amount.

 

If you don't want to "experiment," just buy the "plug," or use some tape over the f-holes.

Lot's of options, available. [thumbup]

 

 

CB

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Just takes some patience, and initiative. A willingness to "experiment" a bit, as well.

It's not difficult, really. But, some "trial and error" may be required, to find the

best placement, in your own instrument. You might even have to use a couple or 3 blocks.

My own, has 2...one slightly behind the bridge, and one placed between the pickups. Other

folks, have used a few as 1, and as many as 3-4, dending on their particular instrument,

and...the actual feedback reduction "goal" amount.

 

If you don't want to "experiment," just buy the "plug," or use some tape over the f-holes.

Lot's of options, available. [thumbup]

 

 

CB

 

I prefer the sound of your idea. So its one piece of balsa laid on its side stuck on the inside but pretty much jammed in if you get what I mean? And pretty much directly below the bridge pup?

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I prefer the sound of your idea. So its one piece of balsa laid on its side stuck on the inside but pretty much jammed in if you get what I mean? And pretty much directly below the bridge pup?

 

On it's side, or "end to end." It's just to diminish the back, and top moving at different

frequencies, which causes the feed back. And, again...try different areas, and different

numbers of blocks...1, 2, even 3...again, depending on how much you want to minimize "feedback."

Some folks don't want to minimize it, entirely...as they like, and use it, a bit.

So, your own requirements, may/will probably be different than some other people's.

 

Once you determine the "best" placement, and amount...THEN, use the adhesive, to secure them,

in those areas, for a more "permanent" result. Still, you can move or remove them, easily,

IF you use only that type "spirit gum," or similar, repositioning adhesive.

 

Good Luck!

 

CB

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I don't want to sound like a "Mr.Rockefeller" or anything, but $60 for a produced fix that doesn't do any damage to the F holes/guitar sound pretty cheap to me. I can imagine hours of ****'n around with other fixes and I'm not "dissing" CB's fix at all. Maybe after fix'n stuff all day long I'm just tired of working on things that someone else had done the work to cure if you know what I mean.

 

If you can find some higher density foam (not the open cell squishy stuff) and make a pattern of the F holes, you could cut them out of the foam with a razor knife (Xacto style). Again, mucho time IMHO that could be used playing. But, if you'd like to DYI it may be similar to the ones you can purchase. Soft enough to not hurt the wood, hard enough to go into the holes & stay put. Light as a feather and sound dead as well.

 

Aster

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CB,

 

I will say that is a dang good idea and that isn't visible. Do you send the balsa chunks in via a Pup cutout? I guess if you were stringing up it really wouldn't take much more time to install.

 

I just never play loud enough to feedback bad in my living room as I don't gig so I'm kind of not "on the beam" so to speak. Now I've got to get the ol Elitist out and start playing it this week with all this Casino talk. [biggrin]

 

Aster

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CB,

 

I will say that is a dang good idea and that isn't visible. Do you send the balsa chunks in via a Pup cutout? I guess if you were stringing up it really wouldn't take much more time to install.

 

I just never play loud enough to feedback bad in my living room as I don't gig so I'm kind of not "on the beam" so to speak. Now I've got to get the ol Elitist out and start playing it this week with all this Casino talk. [biggrin]

 

Aster

 

Exactly! Takes a little finesse, and some patience. But, it's worth it...at least it was, to me.

 

 

CB

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There are guitarists that play loud that don't plug their F holes, and don't have feedback problems

 

A Florida blues guitarist, JP Soars, plays an Epi Joe Pass. I've seen him several times at local blues festivals and have never heard any feedback from that guitar. After one of his sets, I asked him how he kept his hollowbody from feedbacking at such loud volumes. He said he kept the bass on the amp turned down low, that low-end vibration is what causes most of the feedback in hollowbodies. Also seen blues guitarist Johnnie Bassett play a Heritage hollowbody at a 600 seat venue without any feedback.

 

I saw Ted Nugent at a big festival back in his Amboy Duke days (before guitars were run thru PA's), when he was playing a Byrdland, and he only got feedback when he wanted it. He positioned himself away from the speaker cabinet, and on a few songs (Baby Please Don't Go, etc) he'd turn to face this amp to get deliberately get feedback, which was a very cool effect. It would roar like a lion, but then he'd move and the feedback would end.

 

I have a couple friends in local blues bands with deep hollowbodies, one with an Epi ES295, the other with a Dean Palomino. They play at moderate volumes at local venues without feedback. They're aware of where they are in relation to their amps, and between sets have one hand on the strings, or turn the PU volume down.

 

It can be done.

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There are guitarists that play loud don't plug their F holes, and don't have feedback problems

 

A Florida blues guitarist, JP Soars, plays an Epi Joe Pass. I've seen him several times at local blues festivals and have never heard any feedback from that guitar. After one of his sets, I asked him how he kept his hollowbody from feedbacking at such loud volumes. He said he kept the bass on the amp turned down low, that low-end vibration is what causes most of the feedback in hollowbodies. Also seen blues guitarist Johnnie Bassett play a Heritage hollowbody at a 600 seat venue without any feedback.

 

I saw Ted Nugent at a big festival back in his Amboy Duke days (before guitars were run thru PA's), when he was playing a Byrdland, and he only got feedback when he wanted it. He positioned himself away from the speaker cabinet, and on a few songs (Baby Please Don't Go, etc) he'd turn to face this amp to get deliberately get feedback, which was a very cool effect. It would roar like a lion, but then he'd move and the feedback would end.

 

I have a couple friends in local blues bands with deep hollowbodies, one with an Epi ES295, the other with a Dean Palomino. They play at moderate volumes at local venues without feedback. They're aware of where they are in relation to their amps, and between sets have one hand on the strings, or turn the PU volume down.

 

It can be done.

 

I play with very little bass on my amp and this didn't work for me. The casino still had lots of feedback. On my old casino before I sold it, I had the pots waxed and that did help the feedback, there was definitely a big improvement.

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