Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

2014 Melody Maker pick-ups


profgalen

Recommended Posts

I bought a 2014 Les Paul melody Maker today. I really love it. I especially like the sound of the P90S pick-ups. Can someone tell me about these? Is it a new design? Have they ever been used in other past models? It seems that the pole pieces are the Alnico V magnets unlike regular P90s.

IMG_0132_zpsf04be6f1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe this is the first time Gibson used this particular design. I think that it has two coils unlike regular P90's. And you've also noticed that it has magnetic pole pieces instead of the usual bar shaped magnets that Gibson uses for most of their pick ups.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe this is the first time Gibson used this particular design. I think that it has two coils unlike regular P90's. And you've also noticed that it has magnetic pole pieces instead of the usual bar shaped magnets that Gibson uses for most of their pick ups.

When you say "two coils" do you mean stacked coils for hum cancellation like a P100? These seem to hum as much as any P90. However hum is greatly reduced in the center position leading me to assume one pick-up is RWRP.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't find info anywhere online. I assume nobody has taken one apart yet and Gibson has not released the specifications either. They do not say what makes it a P90SR/ST. Maybe the S is for stacked? Just my best guess...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The P-90 has a well-deserved reputation as a single-coil pickup with a big, fat, high-output sound—not the thin character often associated with single-coil pickups. So in designing the Les Paul Melody Maker, the daunting task for Gibson pickup guru Jim DeCola was to invent pickups that were worthy of the P-90 name, but could accommodate the Melody Maker’s mission to be the best value ever in a no-compromise Les Paul guitar.

 

The P-90ST and P-90SR pickups (the “S” stands for “slug”) featured in the Les Paul Melody Maker deliver a broad range of tones for jazz, blues, and rock, with a bright, percussive attack at the bridge (treble) pickup and a clean, articulate voice for the neck. That vintage vibe comes courtesy of Alnico V rod magnets, made famous by the classic Gibson ES-125 models of the late ’40s; the sonic versatility owes much to these magnets, as well as to a slightly lower inductance than the traditional P-90. This combination preserves the power but adds a perkier, more touch-sensitive character.

 

The neck coil uses the same plain enamel wire, with the same gauge and number of turns and manufacturing technique, as a traditional P-90. However, the bridge pickup increases the number of turns to calibrate the neck and bridge pickups for equal outputs. This not only helps maintain consistent levels when switching between pickups, but the middle pickup sound is a precise blend of the two pickups rather than favoring one pickup over the other. Furthermore, the bridge pickup is reverse wound/reverse polarity so there’s hum cancellation when using the two pickups together. Because this is a parallel humbucking technique and not series humbucking, there’s no change in tone; it just minimizes the hum.

 

The higher output and slightly brighter sound of alnico V magnets complement the “fatness” of a traditional P-90. The result of this balancing act is a new pickup that retains the tradition of the P-90 design, yet adds a bit of sparkle to the naturally powerful tone and is also more sensitive to your touch. The new P-90SR and P-90ST pickups are a major reason why the Melody Maker represents value in not just construction and playability, but also sound quality and versatility.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The P-90 has a well-deserved reputation as a single-coil pickup with a big, fat, high-output sound—not the thin character often associated with single-coil pickups. So in designing the Les Paul Melody Maker, the daunting task for Gibson pickup guru Jim DeCola was to invent pickups that were worthy of the P-90 name, but could accommodate the Melody Maker’s mission to be the best value ever in a no-compromise Les Paul guitar.

 

The P-90ST and P-90SR pickups (the “S” stands for “slug”) featured in the Les Paul Melody Maker deliver a broad range of tones for jazz, blues, and rock, with a bright, percussive attack at the bridge (treble) pickup and a clean, articulate voice for the neck. That vintage vibe comes courtesy of Alnico V rod magnets, made famous by the classic Gibson ES-125 models of the late ’40s; the sonic versatility owes much to these magnets, as well as to a slightly lower inductance than the traditional P-90. This combination preserves the power but adds a perkier, more touch-sensitive character.

 

The neck coil uses the same plain enamel wire, with the same gauge and number of turns and manufacturing technique, as a traditional P-90. However, the bridge pickup increases the number of turns to calibrate the neck and bridge pickups for equal outputs. This not only helps maintain consistent levels when switching between pickups, but the middle pickup sound is a precise blend of the two pickups rather than favoring one pickup over the other. Furthermore, the bridge pickup is reverse wound/reverse polarity so there’s hum cancellation when using the two pickups together. Because this is a parallel humbucking technique and not series humbucking, there’s no change in tone; it just minimizes the hum.

 

The higher output and slightly brighter sound of alnico V magnets complement the “fatness” of a traditional P-90. The result of this balancing act is a new pickup that retains the tradition of the P-90 design, yet adds a bit of sparkle to the naturally powerful tone and is also more sensitive to your touch. The new P-90SR and P-90ST pickups are a major reason why the Melody Maker represents value in not just construction and playability, but also sound quality and versatility.

Very informative. This answersmy questions. Thank you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would you happen to know what type of pick guard i can install on a 2014 MM....will a standard LP pick guard work? Thanks!

I believe that installing any pickguard would require minor modification, as i doubt the Melody Maker has holes drilled for one.

That said, a Standard has mounted humbucker pickups which are wider than the p90s on the MM, so the pickguard will be loose by about a quarter of an inch or more on each side of both pickups. However it will still be firmly connected to the body for the most part.

I don't know if there are similar pick guards that would fit apart from perhaps Junior pick guards which are screwed into the body and probably aren't a suitable option.

A Junior Special pickguard might fit well, though i don't know how it is attached.

The safest bet would be a Les Paul Deluxe pickguard, which is cut for mounted minihumbuckers which are the same size as p90s. However you may have trouble locating one.

Cheers and welcome to the forum grayzgrey. Hope i haven't confused you with too much information here. :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The P-90 has a well-deserved reputation as a single-coil pickup with a big, fat, high-output sound—not the thin character often associated with single-coil pickups. So in designing the Les Paul Melody Maker, the daunting task for Gibson pickup guru Jim DeCola was to invent pickups that were worthy of the P-90 name, but could accommodate the Melody Maker’s mission to be the best value ever in a no-compromise Les Paul guitar.

 

The P-90ST and P-90SR pickups (the “S” stands for “slug”) featured in the Les Paul Melody Maker deliver a broad range of tones for jazz, blues, and rock, with a bright, percussive attack at the bridge (treble) pickup and a clean, articulate voice for the neck. That vintage vibe comes courtesy of Alnico V rod magnets, made famous by the classic Gibson ES-125 models of the late ’40s; the sonic versatility owes much to these magnets, as well as to a slightly lower inductance than the traditional P-90. This combination preserves the power but adds a perkier, more touch-sensitive character.

 

The neck coil uses the same plain enamel wire, with the same gauge and number of turns and manufacturing technique, as a traditional P-90. However, the bridge pickup increases the number of turns to calibrate the neck and bridge pickups for equal outputs. This not only helps maintain consistent levels when switching between pickups, but the middle pickup sound is a precise blend of the two pickups rather than favoring one pickup over the other. Furthermore, the bridge pickup is reverse wound/reverse polarity so there’s hum cancellation when using the two pickups together. Because this is a parallel humbucking technique and not series humbucking, there’s no change in tone; it just minimizes the hum.

 

The higher output and slightly brighter sound of alnico V magnets complement the “fatness” of a traditional P-90. The result of this balancing act is a new pickup that retains the tradition of the P-90 design, yet adds a bit of sparkle to the naturally powerful tone and is also more sensitive to your touch. The new P-90SR and P-90ST pickups are a major reason why the Melody Maker represents value in not just construction and playability, but also sound quality and versatility.

pauloon.. sorry but do i sense a little bit of copy-paste? :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The P-90 has a well-deserved reputation as a single-coil pickup with a big, fat, high-output sound—not the thin character often associated with single-coil pickups. So in designing the Les Paul Melody Maker, the daunting task for Gibson pickup guru Jim DeCola was to invent pickups that were worthy of the P-90 name, but could accommodate the Melody Maker’s mission to be the best value ever in a no-compromise Les Paul guitar.

 

The P-90ST and P-90SR pickups (the “S” stands for “slug”) featured in the Les Paul Melody Maker deliver a broad range of tones for jazz, blues, and rock, with a bright, percussive attack at the bridge (treble) pickup and a clean, articulate voice for the neck. That vintage vibe comes courtesy of Alnico V rod magnets, made famous by the classic Gibson ES-125 models of the late ’40s; the sonic versatility owes much to these magnets, as well as to a slightly lower inductance than the traditional P-90. This combination preserves the power but adds a perkier, more touch-sensitive character.

 

The neck coil uses the same plain enamel wire, with the same gauge and number of turns and manufacturing technique, as a traditional P-90. However, the bridge pickup increases the number of turns to calibrate the neck and bridge pickups for equal outputs. This not only helps maintain consistent levels when switching between pickups, but the middle pickup sound is a precise blend of the two pickups rather than favoring one pickup over the other. Furthermore, the bridge pickup is reverse wound/reverse polarity so there’s hum cancellation when using the two pickups together. Because this is a parallel humbucking technique and not series humbucking, there’s no change in tone; it just minimizes the hum.

 

The higher output and slightly brighter sound of alnico V magnets complement the “fatness” of a traditional P-90. The result of this balancing act is a new pickup that retains the tradition of the P-90 design, yet adds a bit of sparkle to the naturally powerful tone and is also more sensitive to your touch. The new P-90SR and P-90ST pickups are a major reason why the Melody Maker represents value in not just construction and playability, but also sound quality and versatility.

d'ya think i'm stupid enough to write all that out?![flapper]

 

Also i'm too dumb to remember it all,giz a break..:( .

The source of the quoted lines probably would explain why Jim DeCola is called a "pickup guru" there. He designed nothing more or less than the worst pickups I ever got to know, those of the contemporary EB Bass.

 

It's not about the coils - they perhaps would be capable of producing great sound with appropriate magnets. The used ones are much too strong for bass string vibrations. The string pull of the wide rod magnets causes more of noises than identifyable notes on higher frets. The EB basses feature 20 frets but eight would have done for the E4th and twelve for the A3rd. Don't know the five string version but guess five frets will be enough for the B5th.

 

I saved the two four string EBs of mine by swapping these poor "DeCola Humbuckers" with EMG TB-HZ pickups. Now they are really great basses, one with roundwounds and flatwounds each.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have one of these in TV yellow .I love it and find it fault free and a perfect instrument at least for me .My telecaster is redundant.i much prefer the shorter scale .The neck and frets are perfect and the pickups bright but with depth .I tend to run it with the tone knobs turned down a bit .I play it through a Laney .Best 500 notes I ever spent.My first Gibson .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...