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Are Gibsons Worth the Price ?


Nine Black

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Yes !!! They are Worth what You pay for them ,unless the dealer or middle man has inflated the Retail price .At this point, that buyer is selling it 3 Years later trying to make back his or her money with a 20 percent profit over what they paid . This is when in most cases, I am sad to say ,that the Guitar ends up in the hands of some one who never played a Guitar or ever will ,it is just an invest ment , there Kind keep them out of the hands of Grate players , It is Sad for the Guitar as all Gibsons or any well made Guitar deserves to be played .not locked away to collect Dust ,and it is Why there are a lot of Happy Epiphones out there making Music , What it all comes down to and this is just my way of thinking If You truly want that Axe and have no intention of ever letting it go , Then it is Priceless , You made the choice ,whether it was 4,000 or 20,000 Your going to play it until You Die ,All Guitars sound better with age. I also believe that the more You play them the more receptive the become to your hand and spirit. I don't own a Guitar that I never Play they all get played .For me there is no room in my life for a Primodana or a unusable Beautiful dust collector ,I hope this sheds some light on the price of why Gibsons are priced as they are ,Your paying for the Heritage not the name .....

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Every guitar that supports me is worth I play her. Helping to express what I want to is the most crucial part in my opinion. I wouldn't buy or keep a guitar that isn't a player to me.

 

Mine are getting played in varying proportions, depending on which of my songs I want to play. In the average, my use of them is rather hybrid-heavy since I actually use acoustic piezo tones and magnetic pickup tones within particular songs rather often. Among these are my Alex Lifeson Les Paul Axcess and my SG Supra, and they are worth their money, too.

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Hello!

 

Sorry to say, Your post is a non-sense.

 

Besides, those existing few `58-`60 Les Pauls, that might be "collecting dust", what else can be considered to be a collector's object?

 

Those "locked away" guitars are the 0.001% of those produced and well-played.

 

Cheers... Bence

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Hello!

 

Sorry to say, Your post is a non-sense.

 

Besides, those existing few `58-`60 Les Pauls, that might be "collecting dust", what else can be considered to be a collector's object?

 

Those "locked away" guitars are the 0.001% of those produced and well-played.

 

Cheers... Bence

Not sure about that. I reasonably assume the opposite. By far most guitars ever sold and basically still intact are leading their lives on the shelf or in a closet without ever getting touched for years or decades. All brands, all makes, all years of build, all around the planet.

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Not sure about that. I reasonably assume the opposite. By far most guitars ever sold and basically still intact are leading their lives on the shelf or in a closet without ever getting touched for years or decades. All brands, all makes, all years of build, all around the planet.

 

Hello Capmaster!

 

Then I put it this way: how much percentage of the guitars produced worth to be considered as an investment?

 

Does such an attitude has an impact on new guitar prices? I am skeptical.

 

Cheers... Bence

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Hello Capmaster!

 

Then I put it this way: how much percentage of the guitars produced worth to be considered as an investment?

 

Does such an attitude has an impact on new guitar prices? I am skeptical.

 

Cheers... Bence

I'm sure it has. Manufacturers advertise prestige and making history. In fact, these slogans affect a brand's perception and thus reputation. This will have an effect on new guitar prices, too, we may like it or not.

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I'm sure it has. Manufacturers advertise prestige and making history. In fact, these slogans affect a brand's perception and thus reputation. This will have an effect on new guitar prices, too, we may like it or not.

 

Just for the sake of the debate... :)

 

Gibson built it's reputation on 30s/40s arch-top jazz-boxes, later on, - in the 50s - on the semi-hollow guitars, and the Les Paul.

 

The Les Paul's first run wasn't received nearly as good, as it got worshipped later, in the mid-to-late 60s. The prices started to climb up after the Les Paul got discontinued, and as around 1700 pieces were made of the legendary Standards, those guitar's prices still constantly climb up.

 

Then the Les Paul got reissued in 1968 and came the Norlin years, which are still considered the worst period of Gibson.

 

Not to mention, despite of the marketing slogans, the voices about the poor QC are much louder than they should be - but definitely that's what can be heard from all around the web.

 

Assuming all the ups and downs, can we say Gibson's prices are based on it's reputation mainly?

 

Cheers... Bence

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...

 

Assuming all the ups and downs, can we say Gibson's prices are based on it's reputation mainly?

 

Cheers... Bence

No matter what product, manufacturer or brand, most stuff is sold mainly through imagination of the customer. The rest is about performance.

 

Remember I mentioned my by far most expensive guitars in post #2. They are Gibsons. I bought them for performance. Do they have to be Epiphones, due to their slogan? For sure they would have been cheaper, but they don't offer such guitars.

 

Now we are straight back to the topic question although just one of those I mentioned is a Custom Shop and none a VOS like mentioned in the topic description.

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No matter what product, manufacturer or brand, most stuff is sold mainly through imagination of the customer. The rest is about performance.

 

...

 

Now we are straight back to the topic question although just one of those I mentioned is a Custom Shop and none a VOS like mentioned in the topic description.

 

Ok, so people choose Gibsons over, - let's say - Ibanez guitars because of imagination?

 

Yes, since most Ibanez' are easier to play, more ergonomic, modern designs. Not heavy, fret access is generally better.

 

No, because, hm well. (You might be right).

 

But then again, not mentioning Collector's Choices, are the customers of Historic and Custom guitars are buying those for the display case mainly? Aren't does over-expensive guitars allow Gibson to release cheaper models for us ordinary people? If I would ever buy a Historic, it will be a '74 Custom due to it's prefered by me neck profile. But I might be the minority...

 

Best wishes... Bence

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When I was saying "most stuff", this includes clothes, shoes, cars, electric tools, simply everything. Think about watches - a fake Rolex is for imagination as well as a faked Gibson. If a deal looks too good to be true...

 

Performance is what counts in the end. Fancy premium cars feature lots of things useless in everyday traffic as well as for the average driver. Imagination of usefulness makes people willing to pay since the badge is included. Driving by the rules, it all won't make that much of a difference except for price.

 

If I play crap, it will sound crappy on any guitar. If I want to improve my playing, my very benchmark is a nice guitar set up nicely. I create my own songs, following some rules of notes and keys, rhythm and tempo, but everything else is to my rule. Music is art, and art is very different from car traffic or mounting shelves to walls.

 

Besides some general ones like twelve tone equal temperament, I create rules of my own. If a song calls for electric and acoustic guitar tones as well, I will have to invest to follow these rules. Since I can't control my inspiration, my imagination might either follow or not. In case I decide to follow, I will have to take the duties arising through it.

 

Following these duties, there had to be some very special guitars offered stock, in particular Gibsons, and some heavily modded guitars, in particular Fenders. In the end, I just tried to meet my imagination, partly fueled by dreaming through many, many years. Effectively doing so costed me some money, but I think it's worth the effort. Others may have preferred buying a fancy car or so...

 

I know that there are lots of players who could make my guitars sound much better than me, but there are no guitars at any price which could make sound better what I'm doing than mine I believe. Partly this is imagination, too, but to me it is simply - priceless. All the rest is practicing and rehearsing.

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The point of my Post was to point out to those new to playing Guitar why Gibson pricing was High ,and not be discouraged but to Save For the Axe of there Life...

 

 

This 58 Les Paul Jr has been played every Day since 1988 it has more battle Scars then all my Axes put together , it was last appraised at 40,000 15 Years ago The reason is it has an Ebony finger Board , Holly Board Viner Peg Head ,No dot on the real Mother of pearl Gibson inlay ,and The original Floyd Rose Gibson put on it as can be see at the nut it was not a mod but a custom Shop 58 it was the only one Built and the first to have the extra thick Peg Head that Gibson just started recently using for added reinforcement , it was only 750.00 Money Well Spent it has never had a Broken head Stock and never been Refinished Just Played Hard For it's whole Life , I could not Imagine this Axe in a Display Case as I have to be in the Studio in three Hours She's Locked and Loaded !!! Have a good night My Friends .

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The point of my Post was to point out to those new to playing Guitar why Gibson pricing was High ,and not be discouraged but to Save For the Axe of there Life...

 

I'm not one to get into guitar theological discussion but...

 

First off I don't know one single guitar player who started with a Gibson and kept it a lifetime.

 

Next up is the Gibson propensity to add features and charge a lot of buckazoids for like neck, body, F hole binding, yellow plating, upgraded tuners etc, where new players see the top end Gibby's having these features and also on guitars for 1/10 of the price made in Asia. Add to that given the fact that your first guitar is a learning experience for the style you may want to play for a short while, WHY spend premium dollars on one?

 

Now is a 335 without head, F hole binding with dot markers REALLY worth 3-4x more than an Ibanez FAR better appointed? To me yes, but to a newbie? No I do not think so. Now before anyone says the appointments don't make a guitar explain why the L5, Byrdland, and top end LP's have it. Because people want it and many can't now or ever will be able to afford it!

 

Don't get me wrong, I'm not a Gibson basher, I have more than a few, but to suggest that they're "worth" it is a broad stroke with a very broad brush that applies to some and definitely not to others.

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...

First off I don't know one single guitar player who started with a Gibson and kept it a lifetime.

...

Don't get me wrong, I'm not a Gibson basher, I have more than a few, but to suggest that they're "worth" it is a broad stroke with a very broad brush that applies to some and definitely not to others.

Definitely agree in both points.

 

On the other hand, I know fairly many players who decided to buy at least one Gibson after their beginner days and also stayed with their first ones of them like me. Anyway, most of them own and play other brands and makes, too, also like me.

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I agree with all the points made as most New Guitar Players , start out on what ever they can afford to get after a year if they are hooked on playing they get what ever Axe the Guitar player that moved them to pick it up play's , And those that want Gibson's learn fast that they better save there money and work for it . any one here on this site has more then likely got a Gibson or a Epiphone or is interested in finding the best choice for them .To me My Gibsons were worth the price I paid as they have paid for them selves they are the Tools of My trade, This post has turned out some good healthy conversation ,I'm enjoying it

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Hello!

 

I was told at the very beginning, and I still believe it is true: A newbie needs a good guitar. A pro can play anything with strings on it...

 

...but, when I say good guitar, I don't necessarily think of a super-expensive one. Rather, a well-built, accurate and comfortable instrument.

 

While I was waiting for my first Les Paul (the delivery took 8 months), I bought an Ibanez RGA32-MOL guitar. It was very cheap compared to any Gibson guitar. It wasn't nearly as great looking one as a Les Paul, but it was built precisely and played great.

 

If You begin with an instrument You like, You'll progress quicker. Why? Because You'll love to play that instrument, and practice more. If it's a junk, You'll loose interest within weeks. That's why I say, nothing is more expensive than something that is useless. If You feel comfortable with a Les Paul Custom, - and You can afford it - buy it for Your first guitar. However an LPJ will do too.

 

Cheers... Bence

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  • 4 weeks later...

By far most guitars ever sold and basically still intact are leading their lives on the shelf or in a closet without ever getting touched for years or decades.

 

No Way, Jose.

My'74 Fender Acoustic languished under my bed, not on a shelf or in the cupboard.

I gave it to my son in 2004 and the ungrateful wretch pawned it to finance one of his adventures.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

And a close nearly second. Started at 5 1/2 on Dad's acoustics, first Gibby at 12 1/2 (and it was a custom too). And I still have it.

 

And the LPJ, that s $? sure that's not 40,000 dracmas or egyptian pounds or something?

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  • 2 weeks later...

A guitar is worth exactly what you are willing to pay for it and what someone or a store is willing to sell it for. That is it. No more no less.

I tend to agree. I do think though that an instrument is only worth the love someone has playing it -- so an "inexpensive" Epiphone (no guitar is really "inexpensive" in these-a-days in my humble opinion), loved and played to death, is priceless to the person who has it.

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