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the devil is in the details


jannusguy

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That's okay, when I envision the UK all the country scenes are from 'All Creatures Great and Small' and all the suburban scenes are either from the Good Neighbors or Reginald Perrin. All urban scenes are crowded streets with double decker buses and little shops, Patti Boyd in a zebra striped miniskirt walking with John Cleese who's wearing a bowler and carrying an umbrella.

 

Guess I should save up for a plane ticket, eh?

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That's okay' date=' when I envision the UK all the country scenes are from 'All Creatures Great and Small' and all the suburban scenes are either from the Good Neighbors or Reginald Perrin. All urban scenes are crowded streets with double decker buses and little shops, Patti Boyd in a zebra striped miniskirt walking with John Cleese who's wearing a bowler and carrying an umbrella.

 

Guess I should save up for a plane ticket, eh?[/quote']

 

H is right... we are still a little "twee" here I think :-

 

Although, I'm sure you would be welcomed to the "UK revivalist tankard drinking soiree"!!

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Of all of those, only 'quaint' comes close...

 

The rural areas are still a bit 'James Herriot' - I live in a thatched cottage in the deepest, darkest part of Essex. Cities and towns, however, are not so friendly as they once were and, at night, often resemble the scenes from 28 Days Later =D>

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Of all of those' date=' only 'quaint' comes close...

 

The rural areas are still a bit 'James Herriot' - I live in a thatched cottage in the deepest, darkest part of Essex. Cities and towns, however, are not so friendly as they once were and, at night, often resemble the scenes from 28 Days Later #-o[/quote']

 

If there's an Essex (east), a Wessex (west), and a Sussex (south), howcome there isn't a Norssex?

 

I suspect that's a common tourist question.

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If there's an Essex (east)' date=' a Wessex (west), and a Sussex (south), howcome there isn't a Norssex?

 

I suspect that's a common tourist question.[/quote']

 

Good question Tommy, perhaps this just goes to show the separation between the north and the south of England has long existed.

 

Also, how come you yanks cant think of your own place names eh? :-

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Good question Tommy' date=' perhaps this just goes to show the separation between the north and the south of England has long existed.

 

Also, how come you yanks cant think of your own place names eh? :- [/quote']

 

You mean like Chicargo?

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I love watching Springer and one of the high points is one of his security guys... when he does speak to the guests (usually while separating them) the audio picks up on him and he sounds just exactly like the "Da Bears" skits from SNL. I didn't know people really had accents that thick.

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I love watching Springer and one of the high points is one of his security guys... when he does speak to the guests (usually while separating them) the audio picks up on him and he sounds just exactly like the "Da Bears" skits from SNL. I didn't know people really had accents that thick.

 

Yeah, that George Wendt, et.al. skit was spot on. When I first saw it I thought I'd accidentally punched the remote button and was picking up Channel 9. "Soss-edges," that is the proper, East of the Cicero Avenue way they pronounce it.

 

That and "Old Style" beer, blech! :-

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Chicago is a french translation of shikaakwa right? Which I presume is of native american origin.

 

Not sure of the french, but I suspect they had a hand in translating it. It is an indian word for the place. Means "Stinking or Rotten onions". I suspect wild garlic or onions grew in the area in abundance. Although, once they became 'hog butcher to the world." the oniony smell went away. The stock yards and packing houses are all gone now. I suspect if they had to come up with an odoriferous name now it'd be something else. What is Iroquois for "Sweaty Vagrant Made Water Here"?

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Funny thing is there is a county near me called Winnebago. I've read Father Marquette's diary, of Marquette and Joliet fame, of his travels to my neck of the woods. In his diary, he speaks of the Winnebago indians they first met at the tip of a body of water where two legs of land come together. It's called Green Bay. He mentions that the indian meaning of Winnebago, is something that should not be discussed in proper company. It too means smelly something, owing to the odor of decomposing aquatic plants. I'll let your fingers do the internet walking to find out what that something is.

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