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Epiphone LP Neck Broken


iankinzel

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I broke the neck on my Epiphone Les Paul...poor thing took a tumble. :(

 

I see a couple ways to go from here:

 

#1. Glue the neck back together, use putty to fill in any gaps (the wood isn't fitting perfectly back together), sand over anything sticking out.

 

#2. Remove the neck and glue a new one in.

 

I'm going to go for option #1 first, obviously, to see how that goes. If I'm not happy with it, I'll go for #2, in which case, I have to ask: for a 2006 Epiphone Les Paul Standard, what kind of neck do I want?

 

One like this?

 

55558087201202292334002171313383300_001.jpg

 

Or one like this?

 

5555808720120530142112067.jpg

 

For what it's worth, here's a picture of the break:

 

580059_10101292326698763_740853441_n.jpg

 

Again... :(

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I broke the neck on my Epiphone Les Paul...poor thing took a tumble. :(

 

I see a couple ways to go from here:

 

#1. Glue the neck back together, use putty to fill in any gaps (the wood isn't fitting perfectly back together), sand over anything sticking out.

 

#2. Remove the neck and glue a new one in.

 

I'm going to go for option #1 first, obviously, to see how that goes. If I'm not happy with it, I'll go for #2, in which case, I have to ask: for a 2006 Epiphone Les Paul Standard, what kind of neck do I want?

 

One like this?

 

55558087201202292334002171313383300_001.jpg

 

Or one like this?

 

5555808720120530142112067.jpg

 

For what it's worth, here's a picture of the break:

 

580059_10101292326698763_740853441_n.jpg

 

Again... :(

 

That's a rough one. For what it's worth I just finally got around to repairing the headstock on my Epi LP Standard. I just used gorilla wood glue and 3 clamps to hold it all together. I haven't restrung it yet but it seems to be holding really well. I think you'll be surprised with how it'll turn out. Of course, if you're willing to replace the neck you really have nothing to lose.

 

Best of luck to you!

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So is the area where the truss rod nut seats still intact?

Looks like a fairly clean break, shouldn't be too bad.

Be sure to use some good professional wood glue!

I used Elmer's Carpenters wood glue to put the headstock back on a Turser LP

along with some Titebond Liquid Hide glue on the underside of the fingerboard, just in case it ever needs to come off.

Good luck! And clamp the hell out of it and let it dry really good before you unclamp it.

Here's what mine looked like, and still playing it today:

 

MVC-606S.jpg

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I found a local pro to talk about my problems with, and he told me that having a hard time getting the wood to fit together is a common and fixable problem. I'm going to have him do it for $100 - several of my best friends have recommended him and his shop.

 

Should be $100 well spent. Send us some "after" pics to compare to the "before".

 

Good luck!

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I just got back from the shop. Not good.

 

You can't really tell from the picture I have posted, but the neck actually had two pieces break off - the headstock, like you can see, but then also another part of the neck broke off on the back.

 

Once the guy at the shop had a look at the neck, he told me three things:

 

#1. It's a catastrophic neck break with advanced warping; the treble side is already significantly lower than the bass side.

 

#2. "Do you have a Gibson Les Paul lying around? If you do, you could trade it in exchange for having this neck broken, because that's what it's going to cost."

 

#3. Perhaps the only way to save the guitar at all would be to get a new neck and convert to a bolt-on, and even that would only work if it's a one-piece body.

 

I'd dubbed this guitar Michigan Jim in honor of the previous owner, a gentleman from Michigan named...well, Jim. Looks like it's time to let Jim go - hard enough as is, but even harder after all the time I'd put into him. Just look at this thread.

 

Rest in peace, buddy... [sad]

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That's a tough break my friend. If it was me, and I had the time (truthfully I have more time than money) I would use this as an opportunity to learn how to replace the neck. What have you go to lose?

 

There are a number of challenges in this task however, and you must have a decent level of ability, and will probably have to buy some tools. Not a project for a beginner, or the faint of heart. [biggrin]

 

1. Remove the broken neck from the body. It might be set with a waterproof epoxy. If that is the case you will probably have to cut it as close to the body as possible, and then work with chisels and possibly a router to remove the rest, and re-form the neck pocket.

If it is glued in, then you will have to steam the joint to loosen the glue and remove the neck. This can be done by removing the fingerboard and drilling a hole through the neck to the joint.

 

2. This will most likely result in some damage to the finish on the body, so you have to be prepared to refinish the whole guitar. Or, at least the back and sides, along with the replacement neck. Probably the top too. [thumbdn]

 

3. Getting the neck pocket to fit the new neck will be another challenge. After chiseling out as much as you can, you could probably use a router to smooth the edges.

 

4. Re-installing the new neck so that the angle is correct. This depends a lot on the neck you get and how it matches up to the body. The right angle is 4 degrees from level with the body. You will most likely end up planing or at least sanding the neck tenon to fit.

 

Most of all you must really like the guitar A LOT to go this route, because it is a lot of work.

 

In your OP you show 2 different neck options. Option #1 is the correct replacement neck, if you decide to go this route.

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I think I'll go that route some day. Not right now, though, and for the time being I've scavenged the guitar of all hardware, plastic, etc. - it's literally just neck, body, paint.

 

I know it's kind of silly, but I'm going to wrap the body up in saran wrap, newspaper, and bubble wrap and then bury it in the back yard. I figure, the guitar deserves a decent burial, but I still want to protect it from the elements enough should I ever feel ready to arrange for a resurrection.

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I had an ES-335 that broke in just about the same place yours did. I had a pro repair it rather than replace it. I don't remember what it cost, but the work was excellent and I never had a problem with it. I'm not even sure how he did it. It was so sturdy that I think he put a dowel in or something like that.

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The better the luthier is at this, the better the repair.

 

I've seen hack jobs where the resale value just gets destroyed because of the cosmetics. (most of these are DIY jobs)

 

I've seen "good" luthiers do a fine job, but you can see still the fracture. (again, a smack down on the resale value, (-50% on average from the same guitar without a neck repair)

 

I've seen where GREAT luthiers have done these repairs, and you honestly would never know it happened. costs more? yes! worth it? up to the owner.

 

too bad about your outcome..

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The neck break is actually much farther down than it looks; you're seeing the headstock, but a significant chunk broke off further down below as well. The second guy I showed the guitar to said it was - and I quote - "the worst neck break I've ever seen." I'd estimate that the amount of wood that broke off was about 3/4 as much as the amount of wood that stayed with the fretboard.

 

Also, is it possible to fix a neck once it has warped side to side? That seems to be the main obstacle. One guy says it just flat-out can't be done, and the other guy says it MIGHT be possible at a minimum of $800 with some carbon or graphite technology.

 

I can put up to $300 into the repair, but I'm not at a place money-wise to throw $800+ into a broken neck (and that's the lowest quote I could get). If anybody knows of a place in California that would be willing to help out at a doable price, by all means let me know.

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Is there actually a significant amount of wood missing or is it all there but in pieces? It's hard to make out entirely what's going on with it from the description.

 

Can't really offer much help being based in the UK, but when a friend of mine in LA was looking for a good repairer these guys were recommended to me as having a very good repair department: http://www.californiavintageguitarandamp.com. If they're used to handling valuable vintage pieces chances are they won't be cheap, but they should at least be able to give you a reliable idea of whether it's savable.

 

Good luck with it anyway!

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I think I'll go that route some day. Not right now, though, and for the time being I've scavenged the guitar of all hardware, plastic, etc. - it's literally just neck, body, paint.

 

I know it's kind of silly, but I'm going to wrap the body up in saran wrap, newspaper, and bubble wrap and then bury it in the back yard. I figure, the guitar deserves a decent burial, but I still want to protect it from the elements enough should I ever feel ready to arrange for a resurrection.

I like it! BURY IT! LOL. Or sell it to someone who can fix it.

BUMMER!

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  • 2 years later...

Guys ... these aren't real axes, so you can't chop down trees with them.

 

sorry. I would carefully consider the value of the guitar pre-break, the cost of the repair and the estimated post-repair value.

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:( :( :( my epiphone Les Paul Studio, anyone can help me??

 

 

It looks like a fairly clean break. Any monetary value is gone but if you really like the guitar you can probably glue it up yourself.

 

What'd you do? Drop it on that tile floor and crack the tile as well? [cursing]

 

My Epi G-400 neck broke near where the neck meets the body. I glued it up myself and the thing played perfect. 10 years later, still no problems. I couldn't sell it for anything above $75-100 but I love it and it works perfectly.

 

Whats up with those screws poking out of the headstock?

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It looks like a fairly clean break. Any monetary value is gone but if you really like the guitar you can probably glue it up yourself.

 

What'd you do? Drop it on that tile floor and crack the tile as well? [cursing]

 

My Epi G-400 neck broke near where the neck meets the body. I glued it up myself and the thing played perfect. 10 years later, still no problems. I couldn't sell it for anything above $75-100 but I love it and it works perfectly.

 

Whats up with those screws poking out of the headstock?

 

if my epiphone one piece?

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The screws are for the truss rod cover.

 

As to the guitar... scarf joint, new headstock. Have fun. Take your time. I did it with an LP custom and couldn't be happier with the results.

 

Remember, there is nothing that you can do to a guitar that isn't fixable with time, effort, and basic woodworking skills. Unless it's a Bean or an EGC.

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Gordy01 may have presented the best option. The break was a bad one with the 2 pieces breaking loose. Also, a project guitar or a bolt neck might be worth a try. Don't let this get you down. I broke 2 necks during my active playing days. One was repaired by a friend's father (do not know what glue etc he used) and it set up really nice. The other was a Strat that shattered and could not be repaired.

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I disagree. Trying to fit a new neck is a complete waste of time when a new headstock can be scarfed on relatively easily. It's going to take a lot less effort to make a new headstock than to route out a new neck pocket - let alone a tight one. And then you still have to ensure the proper break angle and do all sorts of fun crap. You might as well be building a new guitar. If it's done properly, the new headstock will be every bit as strong as the old one.

 

Not that I've ever done this before, of course. :rolleyes:

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