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sbpark

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Everything posted by sbpark

  1. I've always thought the J35's sounded thin and to bright. Take the same bracing pattern in the 35, give it a long-scale neck and rosewood back and sides and you have a winner (Advanced Jumbo). If it came down to preferring one over the other I'd take 45 over a 35 any day.
  2. sbpark

    Picky

    Oh, I know all about your "addiction". I've been there. Had a spare bedroom turned into a music room with nearly 20 guitars. These days I'm cool with the two acoustics, (MIGHT want to add a third, but not really looking too hard at the moment). I'm concentrating on Bluegrass flatpicking and dabbling in Chet/Merle-style picking with a thumb pick. It's funny, when I concentrate more on getting better as a player I worry less about searching for guitars. When I am in a rut and feel like I'm stuck with progressing I tend to spend more time thinking I need another guitar.
  3. sbpark

    Picky

    I only own 2 acoustics. Way cheaper to mess around with different pics to get different sounds/tones than go through a ton of guitars. My two acoustics are an AJ and a D-35. I can cover a lot of ground with just those two guitars and a bunch of different picks.
  4. sbpark

    Picky

    I've been playing guitar since I was 14. I'm 42 now. It's whats been acquired over the years.
  5. sbpark

    Picky

    I agree those red and purple Dunlops are great, but even the thicker purple sounds a bit to thin/airy for my taste. But man, the stiffness and point on those makes for a great flatpicker!
  6. sbpark

    Picky

    The "perfect" pick? Just one?! It doesn't exist! My pick preference changes depending on what I'm playing, the style of music I'm playing (strumming vs flatpicking, etc.) the tone I'm trying to achieve...the list goes on. Most people post what their perfect pick is but never mention what kind of music they're playing with that pick. The most versatile for me is the Primetone 1.0mm. I can get away with flat picking and strumming with it with great results. Any thinner and it starts sounding too thin for flatpicking, and if it's much thicker, it gets a bit dull yet clacky with strumming, so I usually go with the 1.0mm Primetone for strumming, and a Dunlop Celluloid xtra heavy or 1.3mm Primetone for flat picking. And trust me, I've been through a LOT of picks. I have a double sided parts organizer that I keep picks in, and a separate smaller parts organizer for thumb picks!
  7. I have Grover Rotomatics on my D-35 and open back, Sta-Tites on my AJ. Yes, the Rotomatics are clunky, but I would never say they weren't smooth. Quite the contrary. Compared to the Sta-Tites the Rotomatics are super smooth and accurate. I think many people just dont like the look and are looking for an excuse for replacing the Rotomatics that aren't the most appealing to the eye, but they work flawlessly. The Sta-Tites are crap. I'm on my second set on the AJ and it's only a 2012. They became super stiff, crunchy and were not smooth at all. I've come to peace with leaving the Rotomatics on the D-35 simply because when that model was created in the 60's it had Rotomatics on it from the beginning, so they're staying on the D-35. It's so nice tuning with them after struggling with the Start-Tites on the AJ.
  8. For those of you who have a maple back and sides "Advanced Jumbo" how would you describe the sound? How does it sound compared to a J200? I love my AJ, and also love J200's, but can't really justify shelling out for one (I've owned two and foolishly sold them in the past). A used maple back and sides AJ can be had for a nice price.
  9. Interesting about capo'ing...I agree with capo'ing a Martin and it tends to control some of the "boominess", but for some stuff I find that capo'ing an AJ it can sometimes suck the sustain of the bass out of the guitar just a tad bit too much, and results in a really fast decay compared to the other strings. Not always a bad thing, but still an interesting finding with a rosewood dread because I'm used to the low notes lingering for a longer period. This attribute comes in handy though when played without a capo because the AJ's bass is very "vertical" like you mentioned but still prominent, and it stays out of the way of the other strings, unlike a Martin dread where the bass can linger and start stepping on other notes long after you've played those low notes. I'm not saying it's necessarily a bad thing though, because I like both depending what I'm playing, and each guitar makes you play it differently. It's kind of fun and refreshing to be able to have that tight, punchy, direct, crisp attack of the AJ, then switch to my D-35 and have that lush, rounder, warm, full sound. If I was to cut through and be heard with either volume or more miss I reach for the QJ, if I want fullness and warmth I do for the D-35.
  10. I'll take my 2012 AJ over any J45 any day fo the week. Does almost everything a good J45 can do, sounds great when lightly strummed and fingerpicked, but also is n incredible flat picker and can hold it's own in a big campfire jam with a bunch of other acoustics. Mine has a really slim neck, which isn't an issue for me, as I can pretty much play anything, and it's super comfy to play. I just made a new nut and saddle for mine this past weekend, and had it PLEK'd last year. I set it up with 13's and it plays like a guitar with 12's. Ridiculously versatile guitar. Several J45's or different incarnations (J45 Standards, Vintage, True Vintage) have come and gone, and the AJ has reigned supreme. I always loved the low end of a J45, but never liked how the B and E strings sounded. I always thought they sounded unbalanced compared to the rest of the guitar, sounding thin and clangy. I think the AJ is more balanced. It's a big sounding guitar, but without the extra boominess that a Martin dread typically haw. As someone who has owned a D-28, HD-28 and currently owns a new D-35, I'd respectfully disagree that owning an AJ and a Martin dread would be redundant. Not even close. The AJ is super direct and in your face. Not the best strummer, but a killer flat picker, cross picker and finger picker, and little phrasings and embellishments really pop out. The Martin is a killer strummer, and obviously a great flatpicker, but embellishments and what not can get a little buried/not as prominent as with an AJ, and martins are much boomier in the lows (some call this muddy I guess, I call it "warmth"). Two VERY different sounds that will make you play the guitar differently.
  11. I have a 2012 AJ that's my #1 (and currently only acoustic, as I recently sold my Waterloo WL-14 and J45 Trie Vintage). AJ is kind of the jack of all trades and in an interesting combo with the long scale neck and rosewood back and sides. Mine has been through the ringer a bit with a previous owner as it's reported to been on the road a bit, has a few battle scars and a repaired broken headstock, but I love it. Has a lot of the warmth of a traditional rosewood back and sides guitar but without the muddiness and still retains a crisp, clear high end. Shines as a fingerpicker and is just as good strummed. More projection and louder voice than a J45 but even though it has warmth, it does sacrifice a little compared to the J45TV I had. Mine has a very slim/low profile neck that I usually don't go for, but this one feels great for whatever reason. It can be a pretty loud guitar, but I just dial it back while playing and it can sound sweet and delicate as well. If I want a little warmer sound I use a 1mm nylon pick. Really great all-arounder. One thing worth mentioning though...the stock Grover open tuners absolutely suck! They get worse and worse over time, and have had these same tuners crap out and just not work very well on other guitars, and have been meaning to pull the trigger onside wavily replacements.
  12. sbpark

    SG 2013

    I bought the 2013 Standard brand new and kept it for a few years before I traded it for, get this, a mint Martin HD28! Kept the HD28 for a while but have never ben a Martin guy, and basically sold the HD for more than twice what I paid for the 2013 SG (I got the SG in February 2014 when GC was clearing them out for the 2014's).
  13. For the record, there is nothing wrong with a Gibson with a broken headstock...IF the repair is done professionally and correctly. I have always looked at those as an opportunity to get a potentially great guitar at a really reduced price. I love when people refuse to buy Gibsons with broken headstock repairs (that are repaired correctly). This one though, is no bueno as we have all mentioned already.
  14. Even with the 490R/498T pickups? My 2012 SG Standard came with them and was completely stock when I bought the guitar and for the life of me could not get a sound I liked out of them despite spending a couple weeks tweaking the setup, pickup hinges, etc. They just seemed to be very generic, almost covering up the true sound of the guitar. The bridge was very hot and lacked character. I could make the neck pickup usable to some degree. I replaced them with some SD Seth Lovers and the guitar came to live. Fatter tone, more touch sensitive, articulate, vintage sounding. Maybe the Seths are just better suited for the mild overdrive/edge of breakup type stuff I play, and the 490R/498T would work better for much heavier stuff, I just felt especially when clean they were very unimpressive. I used to play the guitar through some old Fender tube amps that were all serviced and in tip top shape )Twin Reverb, Princeton Reverb and Deluxe Reverb) and those pickups never worked.
  15. Damn, although not exactly the same, but in my opinion still a contender/competition for the discontinued, but much loved P90 SG Classic! And I actually like the yellow. Breaks up the usual cherry, white and black.
  16. Just saw this on FB. Wildwood Guitars (in Colorado) spec'd SG. Says to call for the details/specs. Looks pretty sweet! For the record, I have no affiliation with Wildwood Guitars aside from being a very satisfied customer when I bought a J45 from them several years ago when I lived in Colorado.
  17. As someone who isn't scared away from a Gibson headstock repair that's done properly and correctly, I'd steer clear of this one. First off, seems like ti wasnt mentioned to you by the salesperson when they told you about the guitar, second, it just doesn't look right. My Advanced Jumbo has a great repaired headstock and used to have an SJ200 that also had a perfectly repaired neck.This one looks suspect. Have the shop send it out for repair, and then re-evaluate it afterward to see if it was done properly. Only after they get it repaired properly, then make them an offer, and keep in mind, headstock repairs can reduce the price of a guitar to around 40% of what it's market value would be without the crack.
  18. sbpark

    SG 2013

    I used to be all about the small guard, but after picking up an SG Classic w/ P90's a couple years Aho and a mint 2012 SG Standard several months ago, I'm kind of digging the larger guard, and the 2013 SG Standard I owned was traded about a year and a half ago. I ditched the QuickConnect system and installed a set of SD Seth Lovers and a StewMac Golden Era harness. Wonderful guitar now.
  19. OP said he felt the P90's on a previous SG were "muddy and unfocused". As much as I agree that the SG Classic P90 is probably one of the best SG models ever, the OP may be better suited with an SG with traditional humbuckers.
  20. You never mentioned if either guitars were given a proper setup and gone over by someone who knows what they are doing. Fixing an intonation issue could be as simple as putting on some new strings and dialing in the intonation properly because the previous owner didn't, or going from one string gauge to another could cause intonation issues, etc. And "muddy" pickups could be as simple as adjusting pickup heights, pole pieces, etc. What you may think of as muddy may be the holy grail for another player. Tuning issues are usually addressed by proper cut nut slots, which is something Gibson is notorious for not being able to do properly from the factory. Fender and other manufacturers are the same way. They cut corners on the final set up to cut costs and get more guitars out the door. And as a Fender guy, I'll go on the record and say I've had my fair share of even higher end Fenders that have had HORRIBlE setups off the showroom floor, so it's not just Gibson. If I am buying a new or used guitar (regardless of the manufacturer) I take my StewMac String Action Gauge, measure the action, check the relief, see how much room is left to adjust the action if need be, check the neck angle, and get even a little more detailed if it's an acoustic guitar, noting neck angle, height from the guitar's top to the strings at the bridge, the amount of saddle left, etc. Also check for any repairs, damage, etc. If you know what you're looking for and know the red flags you'll be better prepared to weed out the duds and pick a good one.
  21. sbpark

    SG 2013

    Guess I'm in the minority of those who ended up not being super impressed with the 2013 Standards. At first I thought I'd love the guitar. Deeper bevels, small pick guard, 57 Classics. I mean, what wasn't there to like? Over time though I found the 57 Classic in the bridge to be a bit bright, sometimes harsh and the neck was just way to thin. I Always felt like I was pulling the guitar out of tune, and had to be so aware of not pulling that neck sharp that is became a chore. Sold it, and just a few months ago scored a MINT 2012 SG Standard that had basically never been played, still had the film on the pick guard. Couldn't bond with the 498R/490T combination and replaced them with some SD Seth Lovers and a StewMac Golden Era wiring harness. Absolutely LOVE the fatter neck for both feel and it's way more stable than the flimsy 2013 neck. I'll take shallower bevels, smaller headstock, and a bigger pick guard over the smaller guard and a thinner neck if it means a much more stable, solid feeling guitar. My 2012 has a rosewood board as well, and it crushed the '13 I had. Of course, this is just one example, and there will surely be situations that contradict my experience.
  22. I love my AJ. It kind of is like a hybrid between a Martin and J45. Also, for having rosewood back and sides, at least mine doesn't necessarily have that softer, rounder (some say mushy?) lower end a lot of rosewood Martin dress have, while my AJ is crisp and articulate. It's a fairly loud guitar compared to my J45TV, but has a long scale neck like a Martin. It's a monster strummer and great to take to a jam or group, but also can sound super sweet and articulate finger picked. What ai like about the AJ over a Martin (have owned an HD28 and D28) is the AJ stayed a bit fatter and thicker sounding in the higher strings and has that Gibson midrange, where the Martins seemed more unbalanced to me, having a big, fat low end, but the high end always sounded thin in comparison. AJ's are great guitars. Only time I don't reach for my AJ is when I'm playing quieter, singer/songwriter type stuff, where, if I'm not careful the AJ can be a little overpowering.
  23. I love my AJ. It kind of is like a hybrid between a Martin and J45. Also, for having rosewood back and sides, at least mine doesn't necessarily have that softer, rounder (some say mushy?) lower end a lot of rosewood Martin dress have, while my AJ is crisp and articulate. It's a fairly loud guitar compared to my J45TV, but has a long scale neck like a Martin. It's a monster strummer and great to take to a jam or group, but also can sound super sweet and articulate finger picked. What ai like about the AJ over a Martin (have owned an HD28 and D28) is the AJ stayed a bit fatter and thicker sounding in the higher strings and has that Gibson midrange, where the Martins seemed more unbalanced to me, having a big, fat low end, but the high end always sounded thin in comparison. AJ's are great guitars. Only time I don't reach for my AJ is when I'm playing quieter, singer/songwriter type stuff, where, if I'm not careful the AJ can be a little overpowering.
  24. Funny, I no longer own any Martin guitars, but will say Ryan Adam's "Winding Wheel" is one of the few songs that sounded better on a Martin dred than any of my Gibsons.To give the song a totally different feel try playing it tuned to open G. Sounds great, and I think this is how he played it at the Austin City Limits show. Your Martin sounds great, btw!
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