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help with my 60 reissue les paul classic PLEASE!!!!!!!


dizzy

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about 16 years ago I traded in my ESP for a more classic feel. I got a 1960 reissue LP Classic in transparent purple. I am looking for ANY information about production size, years produced, value etc....can anyone here point me in the right direction?

 

thanks a million

 

Jonathon

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A cautionary thought.

 

The 'Historic Division Re-issue' range was a bit different from the 'Classic' range. Confusion is commonplace. Check out which type you have as the value etc... will depend on exactly which model you have.

 

If it's transparent purple then it's probably not a Re-issue.

 

Check out the serial number using the Guitar Dater database. This will tell you on which day, and where, your instrument was built and this will probably be useful later on.

 

There are a few pointers as to the model;

 

Firstly does it say 'Les Paul Model' or 'Les Paul Classic' on the peghead? Not a sure-fire bet as the earlier Classics also said 'Model' but if it says 'Classic' then it's the easiest to spot!

 

If it is all original and has the '1960' script on the pickguard it's a Classic.

 

If the inlays have a slightly green tinge to them then it's a Classic.

 

The gold 'Les Paul xxxxx' silkscreen is in a slightly different position on each type; typically nearer the TRC on the Classic and nearer the 'Gibson' inlay on the Re-issues.

 

The typeface used to ink-stamp the Re-issues is quite fine in comparison to that used for the Classics.

 

If none of the above is of much help then I suggest you post snaps (see the Website and Forum Help part on the welcome page) - as good quality as possible - of the areas mentioned and someone will tell you all you need to know.

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It says 1960 on the pick guard and les paul classic on the peg head. Not really sure about the inlays (i am at work) but everything points to a reissue except the color. i cannot find ANY reference to that model with that color. I have emailed Gibson but no reply as I have only just done it. Any other pointers you can give me are greatly appreciated.

 

 

thanks to everyone

Jonathon

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It says 1960 on the pick guard and les paul classic on the peg head. Not really sure about the inlays (i am at work) but everything points to a reissue except the color. i cannot find ANY reference to that model with that color. I have emailed Gibson but no reply as I have only just done it. Any other pointers you can give me are greatly appreciated.

 

 

thanks to everyone

Jonathon

 

 

no, the opposite is the case. if it has 1960 on the guard and classic on the head, then everything points to it NOT being a reissue.

the reissue would be one of the historics out of the custom shop. "1960" on the pickguard does not make it a reissue. it makes it a marketing ploy.

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so it is just a 1960 classic? WTF? Grrrrr

 

That's a little redundant, there is no other kind of Classic. They all have a slim-taper neck that started in 1960.

 

But take heart, even though it's not a historic reissue they're well regarded guitars. In fact, when the Classic line came out they were in some respects more accurate than the Reissues. They have appointments that set them apart from the Standards, for instance vintage style press-fit bushings instead of bolt-on tuners. The open pickups are hotter (I believe they have ceramic magnets) so that's not everyone's cup of tea. The fretboard inlays are "antiqued" whereas there were complaints that the historics did not have swirly enough inlays. It would not be as expensive as a reissue 1960 model "R0" or a Guitar Center "G0" but again it's still a nice guitar.

 

So let's see some pics of that unusual color!

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so it is just a 1960 classic? WTF? Grrrrr

 

The only grounds you would have to be disappointed would be if you paid 'Re-issue' money for a 'Classic' and as you traded-in you probably just paid market price; as Axe and bobv have already pointed out the early Classics were generally good instruments.

 

The Classic range changed specifications in later years to further distance them from the Custom Shop re-issues which could then sort-of justify the difference in price. The earlier ones - such as yours, I suspect - had the solid body; ABR-1 bridge etc which were later changed to chambered (weight relieved?); Nashville bridge etc...etc...

 

Although it was dropped from the range relatively recently there is a lot of info about the Classics on the web.

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no no no no please don't get me wrong, I absolutely love teh guitar!!!!!!!! I have owned alot of them over the years and this is one of the if not the best playing, best sounding all around versatile (sp?) guitars I have ever owned. She's my girl. I am just pissed at myself for not paying more attention and doing this earlier. I never really got into teh whole collection thing and therefore never know all the ins and outs what guitar has what etc...As i said I traded an ESP for it at a store mo brother in law owned and took him at his word. what the hell i was only 20 at the time and was buying with my **** not my head. Anyway,I apologizeif I gave the impression that i was upset with the guitar, not the case just upset with myself. Thanks for all of the information and anyone who can tell me more about production etc...would be greatly appreciated

 

 

cheerios,

Jonathon

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this is great y'all thanks. Steve' date=' any info on it?[/quote']

 

Literally just did the search 'purple les paul classic' on Google to get this pic, so unfortunately it's not mine!

 

The follow is an excerpt from the Official Gibson Serial page;

 

 

 

Les Paul Classic: This model features an ink stamped serial number with no "MADE IN USA" (just as we used on the original 1952-1960 Les Pauls). Most will be 5 to 6 digits in length, but the earliest examples feature 4 digit serial numbers. There should be a space after the 1st digit with the 4 and 5 digit serial numbers, and no space with the 6 digit numbers.

 

The 1st digit indicates the year of manufacture for the 4 & 5 digit serial numbers, these were used from 1989-1999. The 1st and 2nd indicate the year of manufacture for the 6 digit serial numbers which we've been using since 2000.

 

Examples -

9 xxx = 1989 (4 digit number beginning with "9" used only in 1989)

0 xxxx = 1990

9 xxxx = 1999

00xxxx = 2000

05xxxx = 2005

 

 

 

You may be able to figure out when it was made at least

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