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DAS44

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Back in '87 I bought a Kent acoustic with a horrible neck set for five bucks. I just used it for slide. At some point I screwed a Kapa (?) pickup into the soundhole and mounted vol and tone controls into the top. The pickups were some kind of Hofner copy I think; it looked like one off a Hofner. I used to plug that into an old Earth 220w head and 2 Kustom tuck and roll columns and play bottleneck. The movie Crossroads was hot right about then so I had delta bottleneck on the brain.

 

That thing was scary good sounding. I think some pickups are more microphonic than others; that was the case here, and that's where it got the monster tone, at least for that application. The other day I mounted a cheesy Strat style pickup into El Trasho and put on a set of Chinese strings, which are copper plated steel or some such.... a magnet sticks to them big time anyway, so I figured they might work with a regular pickup. It sounds.... um..... wellllllll, it sounds as good plugged in as it does acoustically (*cough*).

 

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The lead singer/guitarist from questionable '90s/early '00s rock group Wheatus had an electric pup in his acoustic, and ran it through a Mesa/Boogie Rectifier stack for the electric parts in their songs.

 

I should imagine he would have had to stuff it with sweaters to stop it braying like a chorus of aggravated donkeys with feedback when playing with the monstrous hi-gain distortion those Boogies produce. Back in my rock youth, I used to have feedback problems all day long with my '52 Tele through my Rectifier, so lord knows what nightmares you'd have with an acoustic.

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Feedback used to be part of the music when played right. I know how bad an acoustic can vibrate once they start feeding back it feels like it is going to explode in your hands until you make it stop. Turning the sound hole away from the amp usually worked pretty fast.

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Well, personal experience says it'll sound good but feedback needs to be kept in check

or pretty soon it runs off with you. The Harmony (centre of front row) has been through

Marshall 100watts into 4x12, Blonde Bassman in to 2x12 and currently a Traynor 120w combo.

What can I say - it comes alive. (That's a real early Bill Lawrence pup in there - sweet.....)

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I like using controlled feedback...getting the guitar feeding back just enough for the strings to be vibrating and bouncing off the frets, then flexing the neck a little to conjur an effect akin to a didgeridoo...great fun!! If you factor in a delay pedal around this time, maybe one pushing the edge of self oscillation, and you're into some seriously freaky territory!

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I like using controlled feedback...getting the guitar feeding back just enough for the strings to be vibrating and bouncing off the frets' date=' then flexing the neck a little to conjur an effect akin to a didgeridoo...great fun!! If you factor in a delay pedal around this time, maybe one pushing the edge of self oscillation, and you're into some seriously freaky territory![/quote']

 

that's cool. thanks for the tip.

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