Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Problem with new Sheraton


NickSinatra

Recommended Posts

First-time poster on here. Got my new Sheraton the other day and have what I think is a silly question to ask. Does anyone else have problems with the 3rd string and 6th strings when pressing down behind the fret? I don't press very hard yet the strings mentioned sound really sharp when pressed. Can't really say I've noticed this with any other electric guitar I've had. I don't know if it's a problem with the neck or simply that the strings are too light. They are the ones that came with the guitar so, that being so, I would imagine there's nothing wrong with them.

 

The guitar is a beauty but this ridiculous problem is beginning to annoy me.

 

Any help or advice would be appreciated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds like an intonation problem. Have you checked this? There are lots of methods for setting the intonation properly, just do a search on this site or google it. Pretty easy to fix. I would change the strings while I was at it and lube the nut with a bit of graphite (pencil filings).

 

Happy new sheraton!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nick, what fret position is this happening at?

 

If it's happening at the first few frets, the nut it probably cut too high.

 

If the low frets are fine, but it's happening further up the neck, it's probably an intonation problem and the saddles need to be adjusted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies, gents. Will have a look at the link. The problem is at the 2nd fret with the 3rd string and the 3rd fret with the 6th. It might happen at other places but I haven't, as yet, noticed.

 

Do hope it isn't too difficult/dangerous changing the intonation as I don't want to cock up my brand new guitar!! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

lol, adjusting the intonation won't cock up your guitar, it's an easy every day sort of adjustment. If the problem is at the nut and you have a go at making the grooves deeper and go too far, then it is not a disaster either. Just means that you will have to take it to a tech' to have the nut replaced.

 

However, don't do anything until you put some new strings on. a new set of quality strings could make a huge difference to the intonation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since the problem is at the lower frets, I'd reckon it's mostly a nut problem. The nut won't need to be replaced, just the string groves cut a bit deeper.

 

Take it to a tech and have them look at the nut and reset the intonation for you.

 

Not a big deal, very common issue on new guitars

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What a superb forum this is! Loads of replies. Good eggs!

 

Tested the intonation and, within reason, it's fine. The problem remains that of pressing too hard on the 3rd and 6th strings.I say "hard" but, frankly, no harder than I've ever pressed. I suppose it might be a question of simply getting used to a more sensitive guitar. [confused]

 

Anyone think heavier gauge strings might be an answer? Or do I need lighter ones?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When the string slots are cut too high - even a little - the pressure required to press down enough to reach the first few frets stretches the string sharp resulting in a chord that is out of tune compared to the strings when tuned open to pitch. It's not as noticeable on higher frets because not as much pressure is required to reach the frets.

 

This is a common problem on new guitars and it requires a set of nut files, a feeler gauge, some fine-grit sand paper, and some patience to adjust. But it's not a terribly difficult job for a professional guitar tech or even an experienced hobbyist so long as the right tools are used and the correct procedure followed.

 

After the nut is set to the correct height (or user preference), the intonation needs to be readjusted because the overall string length will have changed slightly.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qavM3G_7Plg&feature=related

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLvqT3JPMnk&feature=related

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Nick, make sure that you are not "fretting out", this meaning that when you press down on the fret that you are also hitting the next fret with the string causing it to "buzz". This could be the result of the truss rod needing adjustment or a high fret. If this is the case a guitar tech can easily cure your problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks. Am not doing that. It seems a case of merely pressing too hard on the string. Only seems to be noticeable when playing an A or D chord. It's beginning to annoy me, to be honest, as it's virtually impossible to play the string with just the right amount of pressure to ensure the string doesn't sound sharp. It's not as if I press hard, either - just the same as with every other guitar I've had.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think as Brian mentioned, a sharp note on any string in the first 3 frets is almost always a nut slot cut too high - the problem is most noticeable with the g string. If switching to a wound g string solves your problem, the slot was probably too high.

 

Tall frets compound the problem...if your g string is sitting too high over a tall fret you have an issue that can drive you nuts and it takes too much of your attention to control while playing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I checked out the videos, but one thing seems to be missing - checking the nut height in the first place. The ballpark "correct" height, as I learned it, is to measure the string-fret clearance at the 1st fret while the string is depressed between frets 2 and 3. The clearance should be about .015 inch, or the thickness of a standard business card. I've had nuts that were even lower than that without causing any problems. If the nut height is correct, I believe the problem to be gorilla grip, high frets, light (or plain) strings, or some combination of those things.

 

The nut heights are OK on both of my electric guitars. The Dot is happy with a wound G. The Strat (which doesn't sound right with a wound G) has 10s, and I have to slightly de-tune the G for it to sound in tune when playing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, gents. Will try a wound G string. I have always been of the opinion that it sounds better that way so will go back to it.

 

Have looked at the height of the nut and, to be frank, can't see any difference between any of the strings so assume the problem is not in that department.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

dude..dude..check it out. everyone is correct, but there is way, way more.

 

nuts are usually cut high on new guitars to be able to not have major problems with a wide variety of strings. the good news is that part of the secret of having really good action is to get the nut cut as low as you can. the nut can actually be cut to be as low as if fretting at the next fret. the lower the nut, the lower the action all the way up the neck.

 

technical, read over if to nerdy: in thoery, a perfect slot would be a half round at the bottom of the string, but it has to be for only one gauge. to big a string, and the string sits on top. to small, and the string rattles. the compromose is a shape cut to a rounded "v" shape. this lets the string hit at more of 2 points that are as close to each other at the bottom as possible, which prevents binding of the string. the wider the angle, the more different gauges it will accomadate properly, but the more the height will change depending on gauge, as smaller gauges will fit deeper than fat ones. the rounder at the bottom and the better the height difference will be, but the more likely rattle if the string is too small and the more binding if it is too big. the point is that the more closly the nut is cut to the gauge you want, the lower the nut can be cut without problems.

 

less technical: you can cut the nut pretty darned low but if you change gauge of strings by too much, you may have to redo it. regardless, most all nuts that leave a factory are much too high, and any luthier can usually do better.

 

now, dig this: tuning on a guitar is never perfect, that is why the saddles compensate, but the adjustment is always at the bridge. the intonation will change, while playing up the neck. the common method is to intonate at the twelve fret, and if it is perfect there will get worse as you go back toward the nut, and perfect again when you get to the nut. so if you have your guitar perfectly intonated at the twelve fret, and you tune by ear at the 5th fret, it will be slightly off at the nut. if you tune open strings with a tuner, it will be slightly off for chording at and aroung the 5th frets and 7th frets. so, tune where you play.

 

i thought you might be interested because you seem to have an ear, and my be more sensitive than most. but for the most part, everyone here is right. get the nut right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, gents. Will try a wound G string.

 

One more testimony on the subject, I was having trouble staying in tune. I've done a lot to remedy the problem and now I can make it through a 2-hour show without retuning! And let me just tell you, I'm obsessed with being in tune.

 

So among other things, I've switched to the wound G-string. It definitely works, but you must be aware: you will NOT be able to bend that string the way you used to. It will take a lot more muscle to bend the string. The guitar does sound "fuller" now though. I'm not going to say it's a "tone improvement", but the chords just sound bigger. Also keep in mind, I play 11 guage strings. Pretty heavy.

 

Some other things that helped keep me in tune:

 

1. Replaced the nut with Graphtech

2. Replaced the saddles with Graphtech

3. On my TP-6 tailpiece, I cranked the fine-tuning screws all the way down! Tighten them hard and leave them tightened. You don't need fine tuners when you don't use a locking nut. I don't know why it has them in the first place.

 

Here are my strings of choice:

 

544061.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...