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Now I've spent almost all of my life less that half an hour from the ocean, and I take it for granted that I can easily go and walk on a pristine ocean beach anytime I feel like it....

 

Most of my life I was living near L.A., so about 1/2 hour to the South Bay. Used to go surfing a lot, up and down the coast. Currently living near the base of the majestic Wasatch Mountains, which is also pretty cool. My wife and I took a great trip to your "island" of Oz some years back. She had a few-day conference in Manly, then we flew up to Cairns, rented a car and drove down to a nice little place in Mission Beach. So I know what you're talking about with respect to the pristine beaches! It's a pity these shots got reduced in size....

 

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mssn01.jpg

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I lived in Hawaii from the age of 8-12. My Dad was stationed at Hickam Air Force Base. I was at the beach a lot. And I have wonderful memories. I lived about 200 ft. from Pearl Harbor. You could see

Byron Bay, Lennox Head and Ballina are close by. They are putting up a Noah net at Ballina Dig - a few folks taken recently sadly.

I had some free time in Sydney last week and walked around the harbour - even in the city the sea smell and the breeze are special, no doubt. [thumbup]

The Queen Mary was docked at Cirular Quay - wow, impressive engineering there!

 

 

I know that coast pretty well Scalesie and surfing around the mouth of those Northern rivers is putting yourself in harms way as the Bullies hang around them, and Bull sharks though small can do some damage! Also the Whites following the whale migration are a factor at times of the year.

 

Bottom line is that if you are going to sit out past the break with your juicy bits dangling in the water, there is a chance something is gonna go gotcha! Especially if you do it early or late when the sharks feed.

 

I am aware of the intent to net that area and wonder in a practical sense whether it does more harm than good?

 

You can't effectively stop the sharks, just kill a few, and then there is the bycatch!

 

Going back to your location, the Northern coast, as indeed the South coast of NSW, is some of the most spectacular coastline in the world.

 

You are a lucky man!

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I have always lived in coastal (U.S.) states—and close enough to the ocean to be able to drive to it in a half hour or less... but far away enough so that I could keep being "by the sea" more for special visits.

 

So long as I am not land-locked, I am good. But I don't need to hear crashing waves or the surf all day.

 

 

Half an hour is good!

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I'm in the middle of the U.S. So it's about a two day drive to the Atlantic Ocean, the Pacific Ocean or down to the Gulf. Fornutaly I've been to them all several times. I love the ocean but was born in Iowa, and moved to Nebraska when I married. We took a Alaska cruise many decades back and we loved it. Probably have seen the Pacific Ocean a lot more visiting relatives every year with parents growing up. Been to Hawaii. Loved that on our Honey Moon! msp_thumbup.gif

 

 

Dont think I could live that far from the ocean Rtd! Never done it so I don't know.

 

Kids are hiring a fishing boat (45') and taking me offshore for my birthday next month and I'm sooooo excited about going out there, and for years I went offshore on my own in a 16' boat......just bloody love it!

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Bottom line is that if you are going to sit out past the break with your juicy bits dangling in the water, there is a chance something is gonna go gotcha! Especially if you do it early or late when the sharks feed.

 

 

You are a lucky man!

That's one chomp away from being neither.

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I like the ocean but I like inland areas too.

 

I grew up right along the coast on the eastern seaboard. After awhile it got a little old. My mom and dad were like Mr. & Mrs. Coastline. We lived on an island in the summer with no friends. Had to swim to to the mainland to escape every once in awhile. I used to have to go lobstering at 5 in the morning. I been stranded at sea, knocked into the drink every possible way during every season, had to take swimming lessons on how to swim through kelp beds. Fell out of every possible kind of boat. I pooped my trou for the first time on a boat. I remember my mom being madder than a hornet. You name it, I hated it. I can still taste the salt in my nose.

 

Twenty years ago we moved to east Tennessee and now, instead of smelling low tide we smell manure. And that's o.k. with me. [thumbup]

 

 

That's a a funny story BBP!

 

How different are we all, as what you describe sounds great to me! Lobstering at 5 am....yeah, let's go! (then I am a bit of a hunter-gatherer!)

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As some of you might remember (probly not), been seriously thinking of cashing in here in the city, and moving out a bit.

 

About an hour and a half from the coast here, so, been looking sorta closer to the coast, and the other direction.

 

What makes me bring it up, is the places closer to the coast, even within a half hour, are nowhere near as beautiful as going the other direction. It's the beauty of the land that compels me. In my case, trading a bit of a drive for cheaper rent, but trading also, a more beautiful place. Why not?

 

The epiphany, is there are a LOT of beautiful places on the planet, in so many different ways. From the concrete jungle of LA with it's city lights and sunshine, to the crisp clean air of the mountain forest, the clear skies of a desert, or the vast openness of the plains.

 

I always get a sense when standing on the edge of the continent. One of the most beautiful pictures in my mind was once, when doing that, turned around to see the buildings of the resort, thinking of all the people like me, there just to visit, for a short weekend of joy. And seeing, against the backdrop of the room light, dog ears silhouetted about every 5th room, of simple animals just staring at the wonder, having fun.

 

 

I remember you mentioning this before alright and I would be a hypocrite if I tried to dissuade you as that is exactly what we did (full time) about 18 years ago. I live where people come to holiday and I love it, as you would be aware.

 

The only thing I would question is the driving time as an hour and a half would add a lot to your working day.

 

Also what amenities would there be where you are considering? Adequate? Those things need to be factored in if the move is to be successful in the longer term. Shopping, public transport, hospitals are all long term factors.

 

The coastline of Oregon from the little I know (it is Oregon?) is pretty spectacular from memory and I imagine quite a lovely thing to be near. Tell us more about that if you can.

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I live about 3 hours from the Atlantic. Much closer to the Chesapeake Bay and only a few blocks away from several creeks or tributaries which flow into the bay. I love being near the water, and that whole "nautical" environment.

 

Way back when I was in school, in some English or literature class or something, I read this great quote by some writer. I can't remember the author, or the exact words. But I remember the sentiment. He mused about how all people, in all times, everywhere in the world are attracted to bodies of water. Whether it's an ocean, lake, river or even a small stream. It's just something about being near the water that puts people in a reflective, contemplative state of mind. Many times over the years I've wished that I would have saved that quote...

 

 

The ocean and large bodies of water are certainly something many have waxed lyrical about since we first stood upright!

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I lived the first seventeen years of my life beside the sea on the north east coast of England. In the summer we would cycle to the beach and swim in the icy water, you do things like that in your teens!

 

Then I moved to London. On summer Sundays we would squeeze into a van and lumber the fifty miles or so through nose to tail traffic to arrive at the beach hours later. The guys thought it was great, I couldn't understand it.

The sea is nice if you live in a warm climate say in the South of France but here in UK .nah!

 

 

I also prefer my beaches to have sand not stones.....Grin~

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I've lived less than a couple of miles from the sea since I was 10 years old.

 

I love salt water. When I was a kid I fished salt water, and the few times I tried fishing fresh, the fish were too small, didn't put up enough fight, and didn't taste as good either.

 

I prefer swimming in the ocean, with the sandy bottom (no grassy stuff under my feet) and I grew up with a pair of swim fins on. I can free-dive to 65 feet and I've done a fair amount of scuba. I prefer free-diving because all that scuba gear is cumbersome and it takes preparation.

 

Right now, the eastern edge of my property is about 200 feet (60 meters) from the east coast of the mainland of Florida. East of that is a 2 mile wide, shallow lagoon, a thin barrier island and then the Atlantic Ocean.

 

To the west of me is a freshwater wetlands preserve and I'm on a Florida mountain (32' / 19 meters) above seal level on an ancient sand dune.

 

Almost paradise

 

 

You ain't silly Notes!

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Are annual family vacation is to the beaches of South Carolina. The 10 hour drive sucks but having a relaxing week with the grandkids makes it so worth it.

 

 

10 hours is a cut lunch job alright! Is that because of distance or roads and congestion?

 

Watch the Bull sharks on those Carolina beaches, there seem to be a lot of attacks in shallow water there, but then you likely know all that. (Or is that NC?)

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Most of my life I was living near L.A., so about 1/2 hour to the South Bay. Used to go surfing a lot, up and down the coast. Currently living near the base of the majestic Wasatch Mountains, which is also pretty cool. My wife and I took a great trip to your "island" of Oz some years back. She had a few-day conference in Manly, then we flew up to Cairns, rented a car and drove down to a nice little place in Mission Beach. So I know what you're talking about with respect to the pristine beaches! It's a pity these shots got reduced in size....

 

rh03.jpg

 

mssn01.jpg

 

 

Sounds nice there Cougar and the photos though small, give us an idea.

 

To be honest I think that the beaches of NSW are far more beautiful than the beaches in Northern Queensland, barrier reef islands aside. Some of the beaches in my area of Eastern Victoria are spectacular enough to compete with anything in the world in my very biased view.

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I've been a keen fisherman since the age of 8 and my main interest when I was growing up was diving, both disciplines. It's no surprise then that I love the sea as my lifetime interests reside there.

 

My ashes shall return there one day and I will be at peace in a place I love.

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I live about as far from an ocean as one probably can. The closest one to me is the Pacific which is over 2000kms away.

But I must say, there is something about being by the water. Fresh or salt I don't really care. It's really calming.

That being said though, if I had to choose, I would choose being in the trees be it forest or bush.

I love camping. I love the woods. The smells. The isolation. Being in a forest or the bush with a lake nearby to catch lunch is about as good as it gets for me.

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I live about as far from an ocean as one probably can. The closest one to me is the Pacific which is over 2000kms away.

But I must say, there is something about being by the water. Fresh or salt I don't really care. It's really calming.

That being said though, if I had to choose, I would choose being in the trees be it forest or bush.

I love camping. I love the woods. The smells. The isolation. Being in a forest or the bush with a lake nearby to catch lunch is about as good as it gets for me.

 

 

Wow! 2000 miles!

 

Not sure I could hack that?

 

Then again if everybody loved the beach it would be standing room only (and the sharks would be confused)

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With my sister, we share a place on the ocean on the SC coast (about an hour and a half away from our primary residence), and my wife and I mostly live about 3 hours from the Blue Ridge mountains of NC. We love both areas equally, but wouldn't want to live full time at either. I'm afraid we'd take them for granted if we did. We are very blessed.

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I remember you mentioning this before alright and I would be a hypocrite if I tried to dissuade you as that is exactly what we did (full time) about 18 years ago. I live where people come to holiday and I love it, as you would be aware.

 

The only thing I would question is the driving time as an hour and a half would add a lot to your working day.

 

Also what amenities would there be where you are considering? Adequate? Those things need to be factored in if the move is to be successful in the longer term. Shopping, public transport, hospitals are all long term factors.

 

The coastline of Oregon from the little I know (it is Oregon?) is pretty spectacular from memory and I imagine quite a lovely thing to be near. Tell us more about that if you can.

Probably a little confusing there.

 

Where I am NOW, in Portland Or, (major city), it's an hour and a half or so from the coast. Where (and IF) I am looking on moving to would be just further out, not necessarily all the way to the coast...but say, maybe make my drive into town a half hour to an hour longer.

 

I couldn't AFFORD to move to the coast..that's prime real estate!

 

But, if I move closer, I would be closer. But as it is, it isn't all THAT pretty the towns I have seen going that direction. But, still looking around. Who knows...I just started.

 

The coast here in Oregon, it IS indeed beautiful, but the water is cold...VERY cold. Even in summer it's too cold to swim in. There are some die-hard surfers in wetsuits in summer though.

 

It kinda looks like the pics you posted...basically conifer trees all the way up to the coastline, mixed with broad leaf trees. And areas of sandy and rocky, to varying amounts. The weather is iffy, mild, but more often than not cloudy and wet...BUT, in summer when the sun is out, just beautiful, like a life-size terrarium.

 

The towns are kinda low-cost touristy, not where rich people hang out, but still tourist oriented. Some of the purist and tree-huggers complain about it, but really, when you consider how many people there are that want to visit, it's a good deal. It's ALWAYS friendly, as even the moderate crowds are folks just like everyone else, ENJOYING a day or weekend at the beach.

 

Many folks in Portland and around go once or twice a year, and it really is good for the soul.

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I live about as far from an ocean as one probably can. The closest one to me is the Pacific which is over 2000kms away.

But I must say, there is something about being by the water. Fresh or salt I don't really care. It's really calming.

That being said though, if I had to choose, I would choose being in the trees be it forest or bush.

I love camping. I love the woods. The smells. The isolation. Being in a forest or the bush with a lake nearby to catch lunch is about as good as it gets for me.

 

 

Wow! 2000 miles!

 

Not sure I could hack that?

 

Then again if everybody loved the beach it would be standing room only (and the sharks would be confused)

Oh, trust me Digs, if you were where this description is, you would forget all about the coast.

 

I never been to Canada, but there are some BEAUTIFUL forest and rivers and lakes around here. Pics don't get it either, as the smell, and the sounds (it's QUIET), so gentle, but yet so big.

 

Some lakes or rivers you can see 20 feet down, clear as bottled water in glass. Taste good too. And you can see the wild fish slowly swimming by.

 

That's why Bigfoot lives there. They love it.

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I was born in Portsmouth and despite a lot of traveling and moving about, have always returned here.

 

As a child my parents would take me down to the various bits of beach or inlets. At low tide I would complain about the stink, but they loved that smell. Now I love it too, and would miss it I'm sure.

 

I also work on the coast, close to the mouth of the river Hamble and even closer to Southampton Water, the water course with a double high tide that is busy with container ships and ocean liners every day.

 

I regularly walk close to Southampton Water on my lunch break. You can get caught out by the rising tide along the shore if your not careful and have to tread back in bare feet carrying your shoes. Ive seen cars get caught out similarly. Park on the beach at Langstone when out for a beer in the evening, and emerge from the pub to find the water up to the windows!

 

At home I regularly walk down to Portchester Castle, originally an 11th Century fortification. I have taken thousands of photos of the castle over the years. In snow, mist and at sunrise & sunset.

 

But Portsmouth is a Naval base. The integrated series of Victorian Forts stretch for miles around the city. Several along the chalk down Portsdown Hill to defend from inland and the sea forts rising out of the water to defend from the sea. They are called Palmerstone's Follies (Palmerstone was the Minister of the time) because they were never used. But the design of the forts are nothing short of brilliant. The French never obliged by invading.

 

I have holidayed on cruise ships these last several years. Endured force 11 storms across the Atlantic and sometimes felt queasy. It hasn't stopped me and it didn't stop my late partner Jan, who was prone to seasickness and suffered a great deal more than I did.

 

I have a seascape painting on the wall of my sitting room. I bought it in Cornish fishing village and its of a stormy rocky coast at dusk. So I suppose I do have a deep rooted connection to the sea and to coastlines.

 

Sea air (even low tide) always helps me feel invigorated.

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I like my tsunami free zone myself.

 

That is a consideration, since, like stein, I've also been considering where it is I want to move to. Somewhere along the Pacific coast - CA, OR, WA - right near the water, that's always been kind of the ideal, the dream spot. Of course, dear Mrs. Cougar wants be in or near a big city (not L.A.) where there are lots of fine restaurants and live music, etc. That doesn't sound real bad to me either. [cool]

 

The history of tsunamis along the west coast is pretty sparse. There's apparently one major offshore fault that starts at the CA-OR border and runs north, but the real major fault all along there is the San Andreas, which is inland, so hey, no problem, huh? :rolleyes:

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With my sister, we share a place on the ocean on the SC coast (about an hour and a half away from our primary residence), and my wife and I mostly live about 3 hours from the Blue Ridge mountains of NC. We love both areas equally, but wouldn't want to live full time at either. I'm afraid we'd take them for granted if we did. We are very blessed.

 

 

Why not enjoy it all if you have the means?

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