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Murph

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J-15 Walnut.

 

I might be working on a trade for one (my Custom Shop ES-339) but I seem to remember a thread about them being "not durable" due to the back seam, or the way they are sawn, or something.

 

I wasn't paying much attention at the time (you're shocked, I know...) but I remember thinking perhaps it was a real issue.

 

Refresh my memory.

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I haven't seen any recent discussion about a walnut J-185 model. If there is or was such a version of the J-185, I've missed it, and would be intrigued to explore the tonal possibilities.

 

The only discussion I recall along these lines was a thread a while back about the J-15's walnut-back being flat-sawn as opposed to quarter-sawn. Some J-15s have highly figured backs that appear to be flat-sawn, and the speculation was that these backs would not be as structurally stable as quarter-sawn walnut over the long term.

 

From photos taken of various J-15s, some do appear to be quarter-sawn, while others do not.

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Brings to mind a discussion about the J-15, where I think there was talk like that. Don't remember anything about a walnut J185, but being a fan of walnut and of the J185 shape and size, I do hope you WERE dreaming.

 

Too much caffeine before bed, perhaps?

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Brings to mind a discussion about the J-15, where I think there was talk like that. Don't remember anything about a walnut J185, but being a fan of walnut and of the J185 shape and size, I do hope you WERE dreaming.

 

Too much caffeine before bed, perhaps?

 

 

Typo, and then I went to work....

 

Sheeze...

 

What are you all going to do with me when I really DO go nuts....?

 

[biggrin]

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The only discussion I recall along these lines was a thread a while back about the J-15's walnut-back being flat-sawn as opposed to quarter-sawn. Some J-15s have highly figured backs that appear to be flat-sawn, and the speculation was that these backs would not be as structurally stable as quarter-sawn walnut over the long term.

 

From photos taken of various J-15s, some do appear to be quarter-sawn, while others do not.

 

Where can I see the difference?

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The ones I've observed were either posted here, or viewed online from examples posted by various retailers.

 

If you google the J-15, most likely you'll get quite a variety of photos to compare.

 

[thumbup]

 

I'll dig around some, I was trying the lazy way..............

 

Thanks bobuz..

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There was points made about the j15 being cheaper than the rest for reason

It was hogeye who had his doubts about them if I remember correctly , sorry hogeye if it wasn’t you...

usually is you though isn’t it ��

PM him if ya dare or include his name in the forum search

Yes, it was hogeye who expressed a concern about flat-sawn backs being structurally less stable. If you google quarter-sawn vs flat-sawn guitar backs, a variety of opinions are expressed regarding their relative merits. Interesting stuff.

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Oh, and one more:

 

The mahogany bodied WM-180 from 1999.

 

It was gone by 2001, darn it.

Yes- the whole WM series was a great under-the-radar bunch of guitars. . . a scant few even were treated to sunburst finishes. I wonder if they were ever considering a WM-200 :lol: .

 

The flat sawn backs having less stability talk was something I'd recently come across in my current search for a maple Hummingbird: most maple 'birds were quilt, but there were some birdseye backs out there, too. Apparently, the birdseye effect is highlighted by a flat sawn cut of wood, and some builders had expressed difficulties working with it, or some concern about it's strength. My birdseye AJ shows no problems, but it is a bit strange how the lacquer sinks into the grain around the "eyes".

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The whole thing is just a fig newton of your imagination.

 

Quartersawn and flatsawn wood are, of course, cut with a different grain orientation. I know when you are talking about necks the rule of thumb is that the quartersawn wood is stiffer and more stable than flatsawn which tends to be more felixble. The same would go for bodies and tops.

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First off Ben, I am psyched you will play out again. Your originals are clever, and just make us all smile.

 

Second, I dont know about flat vs quarter sawn etc. I'll defer that stuff.

 

Third, I can give feedback from extensively playing the J15, J35, J45, and J29 side by side - although that experience is about two years old. My greatest love there is the mahogany back J45 followed by a close-second J15. The J15's neck felt comfortable like the 45's. The top and back looked great to me. I didnt like the rosette - I wish they kept it more plain like the old WM45s. The J15 sounded much warmer than the J35 (which has advanced bracing i think?), which had more treble. I prefer warmer. The J29 sounded thuddy - it didnt move me, but I think BBG has some experience there he could share.

 

Also - watch Chicago Music Exchange. Call them and see if they have "floor models". I think that is code for blowing out the last year's inventory to make room for the new stash they are forced to buy. FVor example, I bought a new 2016 LG2 American Eagle for $1300, instead of $1899 MAP. So you might be able to really score a nice price on a new J15 by going that route.

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Thanks, Sal.

 

I've done a few that were literally a coffee/sandwich shop with my old partner from DOUBLE AUGHT and it's been a hoot. We also both play mandolin so can swap out a few different ways.

 

I'm just now starting to SERIOUSLY consider thinning the wall of electrics and getting another acoustic to take some pressure off my old J-45.

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If i lived there I’d come see you play

 

And yeah ,Sal’s right the j29 didn’t stay with me long. Might suit somebody and maybe you’d get something out of it but it was a little dead. Sal said thuddy but that might make you think D martins but this wasn’t , very little sustain

 

But play one if it’s in front of you , you may like it

 

Like the 15’s myself .. not a fan of the j35 I played .. nice but a little bright. But then dhanner gets a great tone out of his when he plays.

 

Funny I’ve always thought a Martin would suit you and your histrionic style of playing.

 

Good luck in the hunt and with the gigs

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I had one for a while, loved it but ended up trading that and an LG2AE for my 2014 ‘41 Reissue SJ100. No regrets at all as the SJ100 is incredible, but the J15 was very lovely and I’d own one again in a flash if I didn’t have other guitar buying commitments!

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I had one and did not like it. And you want to trade a Custom Shop ES-339 for an acoustic that goes for under a grand used. Think long and hard about your decision.

My 2014 J-15 is one of the earliest ones produced, and for some reason it has the Custom Shop logo on the back of the headstock/neck. It has a very rich & percussive tone, and it suits my fingerpicking style to a tee. But as much as I like it, I also have a CS 2009 ES-339, and I think I would agree that a straight across trade would not be an even deal. A standard ES-339 like the OP's (not the lower tier versions), typically go for $1,500 or more on the used market in excellent condition. J-15s are currently running around $1,000 used.

 

You might be able to land a used J-45 in an even trade for the 339.

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