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rzman

Baked Maple is Unbeliveable!

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I have a ZW camo Epi, and though its not a Gibson, and has a coat of poly on the FB, I love the maple. With the baked maple only making it harder and brighter sounding its pretty much a no brainer that these will sound great. I'm saving my money now hoping that these will stay around til I have enough for a goldtop classic custom.

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I spent this morning playing an ebony one at my local GC and it really is a beautiful guitar. The baked maple is really nice and the one I played was the darkest I've seen yet.

 

I'm gonna wait to grab one after the holidays since my Gretsch 6118 is still fresh and besides gotta get something special for my lady for Christmas.

Do you mean you played an Ebony stain one or...? I only ask because I just picked up the blue stain and it has obeche for its fretboard, as does the Ebony stain model.

 

 

Speaking of which, I will give my 2 cents CDN to this. I A/B'ed my Blue Stain with Obeche fretboard to a Fireburst with Rosewood fretboard for nearly an hour. Tonally, I could not pick up a detectable difference; there were times I thought I could, but it would have been marginal.

 

Does the rosewood feel better? A bit, yes. Enough to justify the extra $500? Up to the person, for me it was not.

 

I paid the same price for my Gibby as an Epi LP Custom FWIW

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I'm wondering about how the maple and the mahogany act together. The maple cap and the mahogany body produce a unique tone in the LP and it makes sense that the maple and mahogany in the neck would have the same kind of tonal quality. It makes sense that the maple/hog combination in the neck would work well to help create the trademark LP tone.

 

Does that make sense?

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Just joined the forum and wanted to weigh in on the baked maple discussions....I've seen some people dissing the baked maple fretboards in other posts......I just got a new Classic Plus last week and I must say I really like the feel of the baked maple compared to rosewood. It just feels right to me. For the naysayers out there, you should at least give it a try before dismissing it.

I compared my new Classic Plus to my 2008 Classic (same pickups) and the new Plus is definitely a bit brighter with the baked maple fretboard. The Plus is also about a half pound heavier than my 2008 Classic.

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hi!

i am an owner of a 60s tribute studio darkback for two days. i was puzzled by the looks of the fretboard in the first place, but the guitar sounded sweet and i immediately fell in love with it - as opposed to a traditional, which i also gave a try at the shop. at that time, i was not aware of the baked maple discussion, but to me it was evident that the fretboard was very, very bright, at least compared to my sg standard.

 

however, if a guitar sounds sweet and feels just right, one should get it and so i did - especially when it is as affordable as the studio. after oiling, the fretboard got darker now, but feels just like a rosewood one. i think that baked maple is a cool material :)

yours

wolfi

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I don't have a problem with baked maple's playability, but at least on the buckethead studio it looks fugly with alpine white. If they can darken it close to ebony or a darker rosewood it would look better, imo. At least the one I saw reminded me of a dried out pau ferro board...

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So, how do you clean/care for it? I have a LP Studio 50's humbucker on the way. Been told that lemon oil shouldn't be used on maple, and, technically, it IS maple..

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So, how do you clean/care for it? I have a LP Studio 50's humbucker on the way. Been told that lemon oil shouldn't be used on maple, and, technically, it IS maple..

 

You don't use "Lemon Oil," on "Finished/sealed" maple, as it will just sit on top, along with

possibly loosening the frets, if used, too often. But, on porous, unfinished maple, it's fine...

just not too much, or too often, for the same reason. But, that's true, with any unfinished

fingerboard wood. 1-2 times a year, unless you live in an unusually hot and/or dry climate!

 

Lemon Oil is one of those substances, that "a little goes a long way," and that "more," is not

(often) better!

 

CB

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Personally, I never really liked those baked maple fretboards. I'm starting to know them better only around now,maybe they're not as bad as I thought.

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