Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Gunsmiths? Gun nuts?


ksdaddy

Recommended Posts

I just scored a box that must weigh 20 lbs and it's nothing but brand new brass bore brushes (in bulk from decades ago). They have 8-32 thread and there's actually some stainless ones in there too.

 

My question: They measure .500" in diameter. So how do I market them? For .45 caliber? There's no known 'chart' that shows the actual diameter of the brush.

 

I feel like the guy in Monty Python trying to market 122,000 miles of 3 inch pieces of string.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This may sound odd...

 

But off the top of my head, I'd recommend a call to Bar-Sto. They're just down the road from me and I've a hunch you'll recognize the name and fame of their .45 acp barrels.

 

At least they might suggest what cal. for your brushes.

 

Me, I'd not worry much about the brass brushes but ss? Not in mine barrels, I think...

 

https://www.barsto.com/contact.cfm

 

Somebody else may have a better idea but - these folks know .45.

 

m

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I too suspect they are for .45's. Especially if they are WWII surplus. They would be used for not only Colt M1911A1 side arms but the M1928A1(etc) Tommy-Guns deployed in that era too.

 

Although there were numerous .50 caliber weapons in WWII and numerous .50 caliber side arms nowadays such as the Desert Eagle .50 Action-Express and the S&W 500, but having said that I can't see a bore brush for a .50 caliber weapon measuring exactly .50"

 

Never did measure any of my bore brushes also I do have one somewhere here in a package as I have two M1911A-1's as a .45ACP is my very favorite caliber handgun. If I find it I'll measure it... I don't think the package has a measurement on it, but it could...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the stainless are actually a "bi-metal compound" and are great for OCCASIONALLY ripping out years worth of lead fouling using a special "reverse bristle" procedure......but yeah, def. not for every day use.....unless you're using a combat .45 (1911/11A1) with an easily replacable barrel.

 

PM me with a price on the entire lot of stainless brushes please...........

 

 

P.S. been a Certified Gunsmith since 1996..........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, the SS isn't an everyday thing, the brass is. But it does them good every now and then to get what the brass might miss. Just use plenty of oil!

 

And they're .45. Definitely surplus.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a fancy looped SS brush I used on my gun once...basically, I shot full power .44 mag loads with cast lead. It was a learning experience, to say the least.

 

I got the impression it melted the lead to the barrel. Got the SS brush after trying everything.

 

I don't really know all that much about it all, harmful or not and such, but I ain't comfortable leaving all that stuff in the barrel. I don't know what corrosion it may or may not lead to. I figure a gun is only good for so many rounds, but the nightmare for me would be to discover it had it's day from improper cleaning, rusting, or being put away wrong, to discover I had worn it out doing it wrong rather than wearing it out shooting rounds through it.

 

It's more of whether I feel like gun cleaning than feel like shooting.

 

"Hey, you wanna clean guns today? Sure, lets meet up at .... and shoot some rounds"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, it's interesting.

 

Frankly I've never measured any cleaning brushes.

 

I dumped one of my two "in the box" 1911s a cupla years ago. Never shot 'em. I do plan a trip to Bar-Sto for a bbl and some other mods to the other I'd started a little work on this spring when the weather clears and I can take a cupla weekday hours. I plan at least to make some nice grips if ever I can break away from "the job." We'll see. Little Bro. carried one for years with an ambi safety since he's southpaw.

 

Anyway, As for the .44 with cast bullets... I guess in theory it depends on the lead alloy to an extent and also how they'd been lubed. Initially it was pretty common, depending on the arm and the knowledge/ability of the shooter. A lot of 'em in my olden days would use "linotype metal" which is quite a hard lead alloy. Also how the bullets were sized, whether they had a gas check attached... etc., etc. Never had a .44 mag. Technically it's a tad under .43 caliber 'stedda a true .44. Long story to that. FYI, the Winchester/Colt .44-40 was even a tad smaller in bullet diameter, "depending."

 

If I had a suspicion of a heavily-leaded barrel I'd go further than Hoppes and a brass brush, "depending."

 

My only other .45 is a cartridge conversion cylinder for an 1858 Remington replica .44. Soft lead and downloaded .45 Long Colt cartridges. Believe it or not, the Schofield .45 of that same era has just a tiny bit too wide a rim to work in the 1868-patent cylinder. For what it's worth the replica also has the progressive rifling, and is quite accurate with .45 "cowboy action" loads out to around 40 yards, anyway. It's also not that difficult to clean.

 

m

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, it's interesting.

 

Frankly I've never measured any cleaning brushes.

 

I dumped one of my two "in the box" 1911s a cupla years ago. Never shot 'em. I do plan a trip to Bar-Sto for a bbl and some other mods to the other I'd started a little work on this spring when the weather clears and I can take a cupla weekday hours. I plan at least to make some nice grips if ever I can break away from "the job." We'll see. Little Bro. carried one for years with an ambi safety since he's southpaw.

 

Anyway, As for the .44 with cast bullets... I guess in theory it depends on the lead alloy to an extent and also how they'd been lubed. Initially it was pretty common, depending on the arm and the knowledge/ability of the shooter. A lot of 'em in my olden days would use "linotype metal" which is quite a hard lead alloy. Also how the bullets were sized, whether they had a gas check attached... etc., etc. Never had a .44 mag. Technically it's a tad under .43 caliber 'stedda a true .44. Long story to that. FYI, the Winchester/Colt .44-40 was even a tad smaller in bullet diameter, "depending."

 

If I had a suspicion of a heavily-leaded barrel I'd go further than Hoppes and a brass brush, "depending."

 

My only other .45 is a cartridge conversion cylinder for an 1858 Remington replica .44. Soft lead and downloaded .45 Long Colt cartridges. Believe it or not, the Schofield .45 of that same era has just a tiny bit too wide a rim to work in the 1868-patent cylinder. For what it's worth the replica also has the progressive rifling, and is quite accurate with .45 "cowboy action" loads out to around 40 yards, anyway. It's also not that difficult to clean.

 

m

 

 

love .45's... My favorite is the .45 ACP, but I'd love a Schofield in .45 Colt for sure!!! I used to do some quick-draw competition with a Ruger Blackhawk in .45 Colt. I was OK, but once you start to rise and compete outside of your own area, you see the really fast guys. I did freestyle competing from a Mexican Carry and the Blackhawk had a 4" Bbl and a Rex Applegate modded trigger-guard; machined off and knurled right under where the curve of the trigger stops. I was below a quarter second in the kill zone @ 7 paces. .21/.22 seconds, something like that. I used to practice with full contemporary .45 long colt loads so when competition time came I never flinched... I preferred fanning and would practice with a quarter on the back of my hand. I'd turn my hand to drop the quarter and go for the gun. I'd get at least 3 into the target before the quarter hit the ground...

 

It was fun, but when the really fast guys were empty in the same amount of time, it was humbling...

 

My favorite Coyote spanker is a Winchester '94 Trapper Carbine w/16" Bbl. I use Cor-Bon .45 Colt Magnum ammo; 310 grain semi-jacketed flat-nose rounds and it will come out of the end of my barrel crusin' at about 1,600 Fps. In my tight New England pucker-brush it'll cut a tunnel thru the brambles and Brair Rabbit's sanctuary without slowing before turnin' a Coyote inside-out...

 

My best shot with that one spun a Coyote up into a back flip at 225 yards stickin' out my bedroom window one-handed resting on the sill holding the screen out/open with my left hand... That year the spring had been like a tropical rainforest and the underbrush was unGodly dense. I searched for hours on multiple occasions on multiple days and couldn't locate it. 3 months later to the day after the summer flora had sparsened out as fall hit I found the skeleton crumpled up where it had died coming out of a brook crossing only about 50 years from where I hit it in a place that had at the time been carpeted with thick ferns that hid it's carcass. I took the skull home and cleaned it out to save as a trophy.

 

My ACP's are my favorites and one of them (the first handgun I ever bought myself) is a Thompson (of the Tommy-Gun fame) Auto-Ordnance; (now owned by Kahr Arms I believe) whom had purchase the original colt patent when it expired and went thru the very same front sight staking issues as the original Colts did, M1911A-1 ramped & throated with an original (no longer made/available) Harrts Recoil reducing mercury filled guide-rod and I still have some original Winchester Black Talons left in a Wilson Combat 8 round magazine, with 3-dot sights. I put Pachmayr rosewood grips with the decelerator rubber finger grooves in a wraparound style.

 

My #2 is a Springfield Armory parkerized M1911A-1 ramped & throated on which I had installed Trijicon glow-in-the-dark 3-dot night-sights and a Wilson Combat Shok-Buff recoil reduction system and another Wilson Combat 8-round magazine loaded with Speer Gold Dot Flyin' Ashtray hollow-points and another set of the Pachmayr rosewood grips with the decelerator finger grooves in a wraparound.

 

I can draw a smiley face on a man silhouette target head at 50 feet with either of 'em...

 

For a time I was a Korean War Vet and NRA certified instructor's assistant teaching combat handgunning to police and government agents in New England...

 

I used to demonstrate a Mexican stand-off and the penchant for a .45 ACP to draw a perfect line bottom up center-mass by simply dropping on my @$ under my adversary's fire and cutting a man silhouette target basically in half with nothing more than rapid-fire letting the muzzle climb from my landing on my back...

 

My next favorite handgun is my Stainless Steel Ruger GP100 .357 Magnum w/6" full-lug barrel. It's a fire-breathin' hand-canon! I load that one with custom hand-loaded Speer Gold-dot hollow-pionts that will pass clean thru two 4x4's and a 2x4 all at once... That's my "shoot my way out" gun...

 

They sit pretty dormant in my gun closet these days. I've never been able to marry my two passions in life... Guitars & guns...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

love .45's... My favorite is the .45 ACP. I used to do some quick-draw competition. I was below a quarter second in the kill zone @ 7 paces. .21/.22 seconds, something like that.

 

For a time I was a Korean War Vet.

 

I've never been able to marry my two passions in life... Guitars & guns...

 

 

When I was in, we really only had two choices. The Browning 9mm and the .45. Most of my team went with the Browning. I always went with the .45. A far superior weapon IMHPO.

And remind me never to get called out into the street with you mate! (lol). KZ/7P at about .21s, very impressive.

 

Korea. Frozen Chosin?

 

In the longs, a lot of the guys would go the 16. For a short long, my preference was in fact the little 30.30 jungle carbine. An excellent piece and less jams. The long longs I stayed with the good ol' Lee Enfield 7.62 L1A1 SLR. Sighted for 300, it was then good for anything between 50 and 1,000. And what you hit, stayed down. A real no arguments weapon.

 

And you could marry your two passions if you try. Be a hell of a performance! The crowd would love it. Be just a tad fatal that's all! LOL!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reminds me of a wise song entitled 'Guns Don't Kill People, Rappers Do', which lyrics go on to explain 'they saw it on a documentary on BBC2'. Now if that is not clever rhyming I don't know what is, lol. By a British rap group called Goldie Lookin' Chain, who I don't think ever made it to America... you are lucky!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I was in, we really only had two choices. The Browning 9mm and the .45. Most of my team went with the Browning. I always went with the .45. A far superior weapon IMHPO.

And remind me never to get called out into the street with you mate! (lol). KZ/7P at about .21s, very impressive.

 

Korea. Frozen Chosin?

 

He didn't talk much about it, he would chat about his time around the combat when he was stationed in Germany more. He said the woman who's house he stayed at would watch old footage of WWII enthralled and get all mesmirized by Hitler all over again and exclaim in her heavy german accent that they were "fighting to rule z wurld." As we know that was only around 10 years after the end of WWII even toward the end of the Korean Conflict and when it started only 6. He really didn't talk much about the combat. He drank alot and I didn't press him. I figured out how to walk the tightrope of gleaning his masterful knowledge while trying to stay away from the less cognizant drunken side of his sometimes dark nature. Walked on alot of eggshells, but I got alot out of it and for whatever reason he took me under his wing and really gave me alot of what he had stored upstairs that was still good... Bought my first .45 from him, he was also a licensed FFL dealer and gunsmith... When I was his assistant I was the one demonstrating because between his drinking, his back disability, and his age he was getting beyond the physical capabilities. He was actually one of the original whistle blowers who had worked at Colt firearms when the original M16 was jamming in combat as the extractor was ripping the rim/head off of cartridges jammed in chamber and allowing another round to get rammed inside the empty hull still in the chamber rendering the weapon immediately unusable and non-functional. He was set up by the company as one of the original whistle-blowers and ended up having an "accident" that caused him a back injury that got him disability to get out because he would likely have been silenced permanently by the powers that be at the time... The positive fallout of it all was Colt fixed the design/manufacturing flaw and no more soldiers in Vietnam died because of it and the M16 became a very good and dependable weapon after that...

 

In the longs, a lot of the guys would go the 16. For a short long, my preference was in fact the little 30.30 jungle carbine. An excellent piece and less jams. The long longs I stayed with the good ol' Lee Enfield 7.62 L1A1 SLR. Sighted for 300, it was then good for anything between 50 and 1,000. And what you hit, stayed down. A real no arguments weapon.

 

I eventually got me an AR15 in about 2008. I got the Remington R-15 VTR Pradator Carbine in .223 Rem. It's geared toward varminting. Camo clad finish in Advantage Max 1. I have matching outfits. I would never have believed that such a weapon could be so fun to shoot as I'm mostly and old-school/old-guns fella. I love Savage 99's and Remington pumps for rifles. My big game killer is my Winchester 670 Safari in .300 Win. Mag. That will ruin anything in North America's day if the shot is well placed. I shot my very first deer with it. The 150 pound scrub buck was standin' broadside lookin' back at me from around the back side of an oak tree at about 75 yards. I tried to shave that back edge of the tree for at least a lung shot, but my aim strayed to a more natural vitals kill shot location and the bullet ended up going directly thru the center of the 8" diameter oak shattering it's shoulder, breaking 4 of it's ribs and cleaning the top 2 chambers of his heart clean-off before coming to rest after cracking the opposite shoulder on the inside of the shoulder bone. I've relegated it to my Bear Gun since... My deer rifles are two .300 Savage collectables. My #1 is a Remington 760 GameMaster pump circa 1952 or so and my "backup" gun is a Savage .99 rifle originally manufactured circa 1904 and rebarrelled sometime int he 1940's or 1950's to .300 Savage. I've been led to believe from my research it may have been an original .304? Savage. My reach out and touch gun is a Ruger M77 Mark II in .220 Swift. I have a 6-30X50 variable power scope on it and I had a Harris swivel-mount bipod attached to the laminated beaver-tail forestock. It's an easy 1,000 yard gun. I've so far only pushed it to 500. I was plunkin' punkins at 450-500 yards without a miss on 6" pumpkins. That is a fun shooter!

 

One of my very best buddies went USAF EOD (1-shot, 1st try thru all the training; nearly unheard-of) and served in Qatar, Kuwait, and Iraq attached to a US Army combat battalion. He brought back some combat footage that made my hair curl! Constantly being shot at while he was difusing IED's placed in the roadways to halt Army convoys. We used to Coyote hunt together and he would always carry his favorite Lee Enfield in .303 Brit or an odd Remington Pump in .30 Remington. We used to set up on opposite sides of the mountain, get bored and stalk/hunt each other... We knew who won when we'd hear "bang, you're dead" whispered in our ear in the pitch black of night if the Coyotes weren't active... One time I let him catch a glimpse of me and set him up good and came up right under his chin as he was straining to see me in the dark. We often practiced our tactics together. I miss him terribly! (he's fine, just moved after he rotated-out) He's now attached to the FBI & TSA doing mission tests on security personnel at major southern US international airports where his responsibilities include training security personnel on potential explosives and bombs and their components that might be detected in carry on or checked baggage. Basically he observes what folks are carrying on planes, goes back to shop and sees if he can make a bomb out of it and then sees if he can sneak that bomb past security. Alot of covert testing of TSA personnel to keep 'em on their toes. One time on leave he snuck up on me while I was cutting wood on my property with my chainsaw, I turned to see a madman screaming at me at the top of his lungs pointing a .45 at my face telling me to get down, my natural instinct was to swing the running chainsaw in an attempt to throw it at the gun, at the last split second my brain caught up with reality and I realized who it was and I was able to not let go of the chainsaw I had revved-up and was about to fling at his weapon and I was laughing before I even got done with the swing as he was diving for cover behind the tree I had just felled. I hadn't seen him in like 3 or 4 years at that time... We had a good laugh... I worried about him terribly while he was in-country... He was stationed in Okinawa Japan and was still getting calls to diffuse WWII UXB's discovered around the island. He did alot of exploring while on that island and has some fasinating stories and pictures including an Army helicopter crash that just happened to nearly come down on his head while he was on leave exploring the jungles off base. He eventually settled with a native Okinawan that he married and brought home with him after he got out. They live in Florida now doing the airport thing after training military and government agents in Alabama for a bit...

 

And you could marry your two passions if you try. Be a hell of a performance! The crowd would love it. Be just a tad fatal that's all! LOL!

 

Makes me think of this pic...

ted%20nugent%20weekend%20warrior%202.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I remember that poster. A mate in school used to have that on his bedroom wall. lol

 

I flew hueys out of Doha in Qatar for 6 years (including DS2). Interesting region as well as interesting times. Used to live and work in Florida too. Brevard County. Lived in Titusville (just north of Cocoa Beach, south of Daytona). Flew out of Space Coast.

 

I remember the civie 15's. They actually marketed them as the Varmint Rifle. Colt, S&W, some Belgium company, Fabrique National, with their FNL and LAR models, and H&K too.

 

Every September, my Dad and I would go goat hunting up north of the state (WA) on a friends cattle station. In the northern part of the station, it was all breakaway country, perfect for goats. My go to for that was a Remington 700 series .270. The full long barrel, single shot. Had that beautifully set up. Full floating barrel (modded forestock, did it myself), Bushnell 6.5 on Hilver steel mounts, stock ammo. didn't need anything else with that. My roo rifle was a Savage 22/250. And I had a Lee Enfield .303 as well! The fullwood. That was just a brute...on my shoulder! LOL! Eventually sold it!

 

As a young man (19), in the mob in the team, I used to use a similar setup. 700 series but in .308 (that's where I learned to do the setup on the .270 years later). Leupold scope sighted for 1,000yrds. Was part of my job description. My Dad's go to in Vietnam (3 tours) was a Thompson sub .45. He swore by that. Reckoned that was the best.

We used to occasionally (on request) go north to PNG and have to dispose of old WWII ammo (above and below the water). Anywhere from Wewak to Guadalcanal to Rabaul to Honiara. Beautiful region. Truly stunning. Loved the diving, the tabbing through the jungle kind of had big hairy knobs on it though! LOL.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can understand an appreciation of the Thompson. The thing weighs a ton loaded (even with the 30-round magazine, let alone the drum I've never held) and doesn't wiggle a lot.

 

The Remington pump is an odd duck in ways. Ditto in ways that old Savage design. I've both in .243 that shoot better than I can nowadays, the Remington far, far better than the half worn-out Savage, though, and with storebought loads can give .5 moa from a bench at 100 yards.

 

I think the .30 carbine referenced, if it's the old U.S. WWII design, is most likely the 7.62×33 mm (rimless), rather than the .30-30 which is a rimmed round - a bit less powerful than the Brit .303 round and the name dates back to the switch of cartridges from the black powder naming convention although mostly in its history loaded with smokeless and mostly used in lever action Winchester .94 or the equivalent Marlins of the era and still popular today. (The .30-40 Krag preceded it. When I was a kid I could have gotten all the surplus U.S. Krags I wanted for $10-15 depending on condition. Didn't care for it although the action was pretty nice.)

 

An aside on the .30 carbine. Williams designed the basics while a prison inmate. A 1952 movie starring James Stewart told the tale more or less, as is the habit of movies.

 

Never had a .270, but I've a hunch old Jack O'Connor would have no problems discussing why it's far, far superior to the .300 Winmag.

 

Gotta admit I'm a far better student of firearms history than I am a shooter. Back 40 years ago I could even give approximate ballistics on all sorts of military and civilian arms and loadings from the .54 carried by Lewis and Clark (the muzzle-loading rifle, not yet the repeating air rifle) up to some modern stuff. But other "fun" got in the way after '79. Didn't mess with stock work, casting or "reloads" after then.

 

m

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can understand an appreciation of the Thompson. The thing weighs a ton loaded (even with the 30-round magazine, let alone the drum I've never held) and doesn't wiggle a lot.

 

I've always wanted a Tommy-Gun; the newer fire from a closed-bolt design and one that doesn't have a fixed (on the bolt) firing pin, but rather the Auto-Ordnance (Now Kahr Arms) "reissue" models, but I opted for the more practical AR-15 when I made my move...

 

The Remington pump is an odd duck in ways. Ditto in ways that old Savage design. I've both in .243 that shoot better than I can nowadays, the Remington far, far better than the half worn-out Savage, though, and with storebought loads can give .5 moa from a bench at 100 yards.

 

Saw my Hunting Clan buddy's Savage '99 in .308 malfunction this year. First time we've ever seen it. It was simply too cold along the Canadian border in the mornings during Deer season and the combination of moist air and below freezing temps saw the rotary magazine drag and not cycle fully between positions. It may have cost him a buck that he had to give up on while blood-trailing as it went across the border and he let it go after a half-mile deep into Canada, it wasn't slowing... He's ditching the Savage '99 for his Remington Pump and has lost all confidence in the Savage after realizing it may have now cost him 2 Deer this season with another similar instance on the same hunting trip. Clearly it could be explained as some inadvertant gunk gumming-up the works and simply needing a good tune & service cleaning, but we hunters are a superstitious lot and he's simply lost confidence in the Savage and isn't likely to get it back any time soon... I do love the '99's though. I have another rare one. A '99H Barrel-Band Carbine in .30-30 that has an Alaskan history and belonged to a hunter from one of the native tribes in the 1950's-1960's... This one dates back to the 1920's in manufacture, possibly 1917-1918 from my research...

 

And yes the Remington pumps are a far better rifle IMHO. They are the preferred Deer Hunting rifle of old-school New Englanders such as the famous Benoit family. My Hunting clan comes from a similar stock of English, French-Canadian, and Cherokee Indian blood lines... We all have Remington Pumps and the Patriarch, now 75 has had them since the 1950's... They all have them in .30-06, I'm the odd duck with my .300 Savage version. It has ballistics nearly identical to a .308 Winchester. We live and swear by them. Especially our original 760 GameMasters as opposed the newer generation 7600's...

I think the .30 carbine referenced, if it's the old U.S. WWII design, is most likely the 7.62×33 mm (rimless), rather than the .30-30 which is a rimmed round - a bit less powerful than the Brit .303 round and the name dates back to the switch of cartridges from the black powder naming convention although mostly in its history loaded with smokeless and mostly used in lever action Winchester .94 or the equivalent Marlins of the era and still popular today. (The .30-40 Krag preceded it. When I was a kid I could have gotten all the surplus U.S. Krags I wanted for $10-15 depending on condition. Didn't care for it although the action was pretty nice.)

 

My take was he was referring to a .30-30 Winchester lever-gun in a carbine configuration after my discussing my '94 Trapper Carbine in .45 Long-Colt. I could be wrong though...

 

An aside on the .30 carbine. Williams designed the basics while a prison inmate. A 1952 movie starring James Stewart told the tale more or less, as is the habit of movies.

 

I love that movie! Saw it again just recently...

 

Never had a .270, but I've a hunch old Jack O'Connor would have no problems discussing why it's far, far superior to the .300 Winmag.

 

Gotta admit I'm a far better student of firearms history than I am a shooter. Back 40 years ago I could even give approximate ballistics on all sorts of military and civilian arms and loadings from the .54 carried by Lewis and Clark (the muzzle-loading rifle, not yet the repeating air rifle) up to some modern stuff. But other "fun" got in the way after '79. Didn't mess with stock work, casting or "reloads" after then.

 

Yes, me too... I've finally drifted away from quoting ballistics, started giving that up with all the new boutique .300 Mag rounds... .300 WSM, .300 WSSM etc. to those neo-canons I prefer the venerable .300 Win-Mag, and my 670 Safari has serious old-school mojo making me think of Finn Aagaard.

 

m

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...