Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

pickups


rich1978

Recommended Posts

Yeah, there's some copper impregnated adhesive type tape that's out there that is used by a lot of strat players for cutting down noise. They line the inside of the pickguard and also the cavity. Does a top job. Give me a day or two and I'll be able to come up with the name of this stuff for you mate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i'm not much of a guitar modder but just happened across some ceramic pickup's for a strat that would go well in my cruiser, anyway any body got any tip's for cutting down unwanted noise when I solder them in [confused]

 

Unplug it first...

 

[biggrin]

 

Alright, that was campy... But I made me laugh...B)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found it. It's called Conductive Copper Tape.

 

http://www.stewmac.com/Pickups_and_Electronics/Shielding/Conductive_Copper_Tape.html

 

 

That's the site that sells this stuff. The Fender guys are swearing by it. They're saying at least 60% reduction in noise. And this is from the single coil camp. I'm thinking of having my strats done out in it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found it. It's called Conductive Copper Tape.

 

http://www.stewmac.com/Pickups_and_Electronics/Shielding/Conductive_Copper_Tape.html

 

 

That's the site that sells this stuff. The Fender guys are swearing by it. They're saying at least 60% reduction in noise. And this is from the single coil camp. I'm thinking of having my strats done out in it.

 

Hello!

 

Unfortunately, it won't do any audible change. I did it on my Tele - properly, all cavities shielded and connected. It didn't worth doing it at all.

 

Cheers... Bence

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Copper and aluminum (the two conductive tapes most guitarists use to shield their guitars) are terrible at rejecting interference. We use copper and aluminum because they're cheap, not because they're good. The stuff I use (in both guitars and the pedals I build) is a product called "Humbuster" by a local company called CC Protech. It's a carbon-based conductive shielding paint developed for military applications, to block radar.

 

They're located in Oakville, Ontario, Canada. The jar I got is a little bigger than the Stewmac shielding paint jar and costs slightly less. Better shelf life too.

 

-Ryan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Copper and aluminum (the two conductive tapes most guitarists use to shield their guitars) are terrible at rejecting interference. We use copper and aluminum because they're cheap, not because they're good. The stuff I use (in both guitars and the pedals I build) is a product called "Humbuster" by a local company called CC Protech. It's a carbon-based conductive shielding paint developed for military applications, to block radar.

 

They're located in Oakville, Ontario, Canada. The jar I got is a little bigger than the Stewmac shielding paint jar and costs slightly less. Better shelf life too.

 

-Ryan

 

Hello Ryan!

 

It's called the EC Coat?

 

Cheers... Bence

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Ryan!

 

It's called the EC Coat?

 

Cheers... Bence

 

Yeah, when they sell it locally to guitarists/builders they just call it Humbuster, but it's their EC Coat. Don't know which version it is. I think he said about 250 ohms surface resistance per square, so it's closer to the EC75 than anything.

 

-Ryan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, when they sell it locally to guitarists/builders they just call it Humbuster, but it's their EC Coat. Don't know which version it is. I think he said about 250 ohms surface resistance per square, so it's closer to the EC75 than anything.

 

-Ryan

 

Thank You, Ryan!

 

I could find their webpage, but there are no prices quoted at all. I will try to look up something similiar locally. At least, now I know how to look for it. [thumbup]

 

Thanks again... Bence

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank You, Ryan!

 

I could find their webpage, but there are no prices quoted at all. I will try to look up something similiar locally. At least, now I know how to look for it. [thumbup]

 

Thanks again... Bence

 

Speak to Doug at CC, he'll hook you up ;). My jar was $65 Canadian plus tax, which came out to about $73. That jar will do a few dozen guitars easily.

 

-Ryan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speak to Doug at CC, he'll hook you up ;). My jar was $65 Canadian plus tax, which came out to about $73. That jar will do a few dozen guitars easily.

 

-Ryan

cheer's for the thought, that's twice the guitar's cost. i'm only getting the pickup's coz there cheap and the guitar's got a nice fretboard and I ain't got a les

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The copper foil I use for shielding, I get off ebay (in the "guitar builder/luthier section"). WAY cheaper than Stewmac, especially since no matter what I order from StewMac, or what the item itself costs, I get whacked with anywhere from $9 - $12 shipping.

 

Whatever brand you buy, or where-ever you get it, make SURE the adhesive is conductive or you'll have to solder every single piece in the cavity together to ensure continuity (you're building a Faraday cage which becomes part of the guitar's circuit when you install the shielded pickguard). It also must be grounded. If done correctly, the copper shielding is very effective.

 

As mentioned above, the shielding will NOT affect the 60 cycle hum inherent in single coils. What it WILL do is eliminate outside electrical interference from creating additional noise (fluorescent lighting, radio signals, etc).

 

As an aside, ceramic magnets in single coils can be very harsh. Of course, not all of them are, but something to be aware of. Nothing to do with the noise issue though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's right, you have to be careful how you go about shielding the pickguard and cavity. And make sure at some point in the process that you do a small ground. But it does work. I don't know but they say the biggest attractant for outside to inside interference is actually the pots.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fender has ground paint and a body ground wire if your using real American Fenders. If you use ground tin foil what happens is an almost natural tanky compression. It will feel almost as if you lose power. I have experienced it twice, once was with a body that was shielded I ordered off ebay to replace a 89 body that the neck joint split down the middle. The second was with chrome plated brass pickguard each time when I removed the shield the sound returned to normal.

 

This was an answer given on the Seymour Duncan forums

 

The magnetic field of the pickup crosses the copper and it causes a physical reaction (eddy currents, small part of the magnetic field is redirected). Some people say metallic pickguards, covers and even the kind of metal base of the pickups can make a difference.

 

 

Correct. And aluminum is about 100 times worse. It you have shielded your guitar with aluminum foil go punch yourself in the ace right now. [biggrin]

 

There's really no point to adding a bunch of shielding to most guitars. All it will help with is radio and household interference and most guys don't have much of that to start with. Most guys are looking to kill 60 cycle hum (50 cycle in across the pond). Shielding will not do anything to help this. It may cause a lot of eddy currents though and squash your signal into a honking seal type noise.

 

If you like single coil spank a noise gate pedal is the best fix for 60 cycle hum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Correct. And aluminum is about 100 times worse. It you have shielded your guitar with aluminum foil go punch yourself in the ace right now. [biggrin]

 

There's really no point to adding a bunch of shielding to most guitars. All it will help with is radio and household interference and most guys don't have much of that to start with. Most guys are looking to kill 60 cycle hum (50 cycle in across the pond). Shielding will not do anything to help this. It may cause a lot of eddy currents though and squash your signal into a honking seal type noise.

 

If you like single coil spank a noise gate pedal is the best fix for 60 cycle hum.

 

 

I'm not going to be using aluminium.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...