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MichaelT

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I'm working on getting together with some musicians to play here locally. I played and toured for a while in the 80's and 90's and back then, I had one amp, a few effects pedals, and multiple guitars. Back then when I changed guitars, I changed the cable physically from one guitar to the other.

 

Question 1: I'd like to be able to have 2 or 3 electric guitars hooked up to the same amp but to only play one guitar at a time. Is there a switchbox or board that will allow this? And, does it have a stomp switch to change them or cycle through them?

 

Question 2: I'd like to have those same set of guitars go into two different amps. Each amp has one input. I would only need one amp active at a time.

 

Question 3: I'd like my Marshall and Randall amps to use the same 4x12 cabinet when I switch between the amps. Is this possible?

 

I'd settle just being able to use all three (or 4) guitars into one amp.

 

Thanks!

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There is nothing worth having that doesn't require at least one other human being to make it work reasonably well. Change guitars with perhaps a wireless transmitter on each strap, turn them off and on as you need them. I just move the wireless to the other guitar.

 

You are overthinking it.

 

rctr

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There is nothing worth having that doesn't require at least one other human being to make it work reasonably well. Change guitars with perhaps a wireless transmitter on each strap, turn them off and on as you need them. I just move the wireless to the other guitar.

 

You are overthinking it.

 

rctr

 

I've never liked wireless, at least not the ones I've had in the past. I always preferred a cable for the sound. Wireless just seems to lose some of the tone. Maybe it was the unit I got and they're better now. And, adding 3 or 4 wireless transmitters and a multi-channel receiver wasn't really what I was looking for. And, as you said, that's how I've done it for years. Unplug a guitar, plug it in. I'm just looking for something a little more versatile and looking for a solution for what I posted. I looked at some of the switching boxes and the ones I'm seeing are mostly like you said, kidblast. One guitar to two amps or two guitars to one amp. I'm hoping there's a solution someone has found that will do the trick. I came here to ask because of the amount of people and experience here. It looks like time for more research. Perhaps I'll drive to Guitar Center and ask someone there. [flapper] I'm joking, of course. But, to hear the response could be rather humorous depending on which person I get. I know there's one guy that works there now that knows his stuff. I've known him for years. The others, not so much.

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The Morley George Lynch 'Tripler' might do the job if you use it back to front - send 'em an email:

 

http://www.morleypedals.com/dtripler.html

 

Also look at Lehle switchers - expensive but highly-rated:

 

http://lehle.com/EN/start

 

It's just a matter of working out the signal path.

 

Your comments about wireless are interesting. Wireless rigs are going digital now.

 

Re your Q3 - any valve amp needs to see a resistive load all the time or it will blow. Investigate speaker simulators:

 

http://www.palmer-germany.com/mi/en/Speaker-Simulators.htm

 

http://www.radialeng.com/headload.php

 

https://www.sweetwater.com/c1117--Attenuators_and_Simulators

 

Good luck.

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Your comments about wireless are interesting. Wireless rigs are going digital now.

 

 

Thanks, I'll check those out. And, my experience with wireless was in the 80's and 90's and I quit using mine except on rare occasions, bigger stages, less trip hazard, etc. I might look into the newer units just to compare. I could definitely hear a difference back then. But, I also probably didn't have the best and most expensive model at the time either.

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I've never liked wireless, at least not the ones I've had in the past. I always preferred a cable for the sound. Wireless just seems to lose some of the tone. Maybe it was the unit I got and they're better now...

 

 

The reason you don't like wireless is you have not probably tried the ones that DON'T sound like a transmitter. I know there is an issue there with signal tampering. I've tried some in the past and didn't take more than a sing song during sound check to go back to a cable.

 

I've been using a Line 6 Relay G30 for a few yeas now, and an X2 before that (Line 6 bought X2 a few years ago), and I cannot for the life of me, (I have good ears) hear a difference between that and a cable. I use it all the time. If it broke, I'd buy another one.

 

I am always using multiple guitars, and switching mid set, takes me about 15/20 seconds. Shut off the transmitter, unplug, switch guitars, plugin, turn on, I'm ready to go before the front man is finished a mid set banter with the crowd. (helps that each guitar has it's own strap/strap lock too)

 

Check out the Line 6 Micheal, you will be impressed with the signal quality. (I can't say I'm thrilled all together with the belt attachment,... but there's always a compromise)

 

/ray

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I've never liked wireless, at least not the ones I've had in the past.

 

They are very different now. I tried the early Samsons and hadn't touched one since the 80's. In 2015 or so I got serious and tried them. Whole nother world, there is no reason for a cable ever anymore.

 

Head/cab switchers do exist. The Lynch thing exists. There are a few, but unless you have a full time guy managing it all you will be replacing changing guitars and re-cabling with changing guitars and checking your sheet and then foot switching your way to...changing cables. It all works out the same if you don't have a roadie, in my experience.

 

Changing guitars is always a hassle, no matter how you do it somebody else gets all mad because guitar boy is futzing around. Same as it ever was.

 

rct

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A huge [thumbup] to the Line 6 wireless guitar systems....

 

I've used them for 5 yrs and marvel at the convenience over cables (always tripping and yanking the jack socket)

 

I've switched electric and acoustic guitars, violin and mandolin with no pops or bumps

 

And IMO the sound is clear and unaltered over cable

 

John McLaughlin uses the same system

 

Which is good enough for moi......:blink:

 

V

 

:-({|=

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Ok, Line 6 sounds like a deal at $200.00. Can I get 2 or 3 other transmitters for one receiver if it has 6 channels if the other guitarists aren't using the same system? Or just swap?

 

One receiver, two or three transmitters set to same channel. Turn them off when not in use, leaving only one on. I use Shure, I can do that, I have, but I just use one.

 

rct

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My guess is that the Morley should work "backwards", but the Lehle units are buffered and definitely won't work backwards

 

Yes, I think it will. I used it for a while with no problems, though I used it with one guitar and multiple amps - if I recall it will work the other way as well.

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A post-script and extra [thumbup] to my earlier post.....:blink:

 

I believe Line 6 were the first to develop wireless systems without using radio technology

 

Radio systems were subject to the vagaries of the airwaves : interference etc....and usually required a user's licence....

 

The new approach is to use digital transmission akin to wi fi but more localised

 

Same goes for vocal mics.....hand held and hands free....

 

My band uses a mixture of cabled and wireless for instruments and vocals....

 

The Line 6 hand held mic is IMO a particularly fine piece of kit with SM58 and other models....and can be used on a traditional mic stand as well.....just no cables to get tangled up in.....[biggrin]

 

V

 

:-({|=

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I'll share something that isn't going to answer the OP's concerns much, but it's sort of on topic.

 

I have an old Digitech RP80 multi-effects pedal that has stereo effects and therefore stereo outputs.

 

It's currently set up in my music room with one output cable going to my Marshall Lead 12 practice amp and the other to my Fender Sidekick 15 Chorus.

I have the Marshall in one corner of the room, and the Fender positioned about 9 feet away, tucked in between my other (larger, newer) amps and speakers.

There's just one guitar input, of course.

 

It's kind of cool having a stereo guitar sound during our band practice sessions, so much so that I brought the entire collection of elderly gear to a gig one time last year, just for fun.

I positioned the two small amps on a table at the back of the stage, angled 45 degrees inwards, and placed a Share SM57 on a mini-stand about a foot away from the amp speakers, directly in the collision path of the cones.

 

I got a surprisingly large guitar sound (thru the PA and out to the mains) from two amazingly small practice amps.

 

Anyway, I'm gonna shut up now.

:unsure:

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Shure <mumble mumble or other> wireless to BOSS GT-100, stereo outs to Fender junky Champion 100 behind me, Fender junky Champion 40 on the other side. Makes those overdone chorus patches twice as overdone!

 

rct

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