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How did you start playing?


nicksg941

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Hey, so yeah how did u?

Personally, i was in that boarding school in England, i was a 7 day boarder and the school was easy so i had a lot of spare time which i spent doing really boring stuff.. in the house, or the dormitory where i lived ther was a "music room"- people who had music lessons at school put their instruments there. I had a thought of trying playing guitar, but always stopped- didnt know how to start just kept trying to play...](*,) ther was this one guitar there, a nylon- stringed classical shape guitar. It belonged to that kid who was really annoying. He tried to play once, or maybe his dad wanted him too, but he was really dumn so it was just there, anybody could play it. And then the kid got expelled, but the guitar was leftin the room.:D/ Then, one winter evening, somewhere in december i believe, another kid, who was pretty much bullied by everybody cos he had some mental problems, he played smoke on the water. #-o Many people played that all over again, and so i asked this kid to teach me. and he did. took me like 2 days to perfect it.:-({|= Then i went online, searching for online lessons. I learnt chords, basic tab. Then i convinced my dad to have me doing lessons, but the teacher, was a great guitarist, but a bad teacher.So yeah, thats my story. Whats yours?

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I always wanted to play guitar all my life, just never had the patience.... So about 2 years ago I bought a guitar and I been at it ever since... To bad it took me so many years to figure out you can do anything you want to do if you put your mind to it...

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I grew up in a shack in southern Mississippi. I was the only white child of 10 black brothers and sisters. I grew up with a great love of Southern Black music, but I had no rhythm. I was often made fun of while my brothers and sisters would play jug band music on the front porch. One day my daddy handed me down his favorite wash board guitar. I loved that guitar and hoped to some day be as good as daddy.

 

Then when I was 12 my mother told me I had been droped off on the door step when I was a baby. I was crushed to find out I was to stay this terrible albinoish color.

 

When I was old enough I set out to find my way in the world. I then eventually got a cigar box guitar and from there I became a rock star. I moved to England in 1966 and developed an awesome British accent. You might know me by my stage name. Jimmy Page. I rock.

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Well....

 

My boarding school experience was in New England and there wasn't a lot of time. Classes six days a week, study hall seven days a week, mandatory sports, grades posted on a bulletin board every three weeks...

 

I played brass through high school. In the late 50s and early 60s there was a place for it.

 

Then a boarding school swing band kinda dropped in '62 into a dual combo: two guitars, drums, sax and trumped for rock, piano replacing the guitars for jazz. We'd swap sets '62 and 63 school year.

 

Since I'd hung out at the Club 47 in Cambridge in 61-63 on vacations during those two school years I'd decided to get a guitar. Got one the summer of '63. No turning back. Of course, getting my front teeth knocked out helped the decision against the brass stuff. <grin>

 

Seriously, no matter what style I've worked on at various times, there's nothing better than a guitar for personal at home music or playing for money. Even playing music in styles you don't care for offers a learning opportunity that seems to be more easily and quickly adaptable on guitar than any other instrument except perhaps drums and bass.

 

As for the getting laid... well, even before AIDS I was rather cautious and preferred lady friends to strangers discovered flirting at the guys on stage. Of course even then there was plenty of bad stuff to go around. Always kinda hoped to find a girl to sing with long term. Never happened. Darn Bobby Troop anyway.

 

Just one point, though... I also discovered that "southern black music" is not unlike "northern plains white music" in that until the 50s, I think people did music the best they could with what they had and played songs they liked rather than "songs in this specific style" society started telling them was appropriate.

 

So... Gary Davis had a ball playing Stars and Stripes Forever and Glen Miller did Little Brown Jug and Leadbelly did Irene Good Night and Roy Rogers sang "cowboy" songs with jazz chords and changes... Nowadays it seems as if you get labeled an "X" kinda musician regardless of what you can, and can enjoy playing.

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I grew up in a shack in southern Mississippi. I was the only white child of 10 black brothers and sisters. I grew up with a great love of Southern Black music' date=' but I had no rhythm. I was often made fun of while my brothers and sisters would play jug band music on the front porch. One day my daddy handed me down his favorite wash board guitar. I loved that guitar and hoped to some day be as good as daddy.

 

Then when I was 12 my mother told me I had been droped off on the door step when I was a baby. I was crushed to find out I was to stay this terrible albinoish color.

 

When I was old enough I set out to find my way in the world. I then eventually got a cigar box guitar and from there I became a rock star. I moved to England in 1966 and developed an awesome British accent. You might know me by my stage name. Jimmy Page. I rock.

 

[/quote']

 

lol.) that was really funny.) I liked that... :-

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Our godmother came to watch us when our grandmother passed away (I was 7 years old), and she gave my brother and me a piano lesson everyday. Then a friend of my father gave us a guitar and we started playing that around the age of 13. Studied piano a lot more back then than the piano. Now it's the other way around (although I doubt I'll ever be good enough to be accepted to Berklee and Eastman like I was on piano).

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Then when I was 12 my mother told me I had been droped off on the door step when I was a baby. I was crushed to find out I was to stay this terrible albinoish color.

 

When I was old enough I set out to find my way in the world. I then eventually got a cigar box guitar and from there I became a rock star. I moved to England in 1966 and developed an awesome British accent. You might know me by my stage name. Jimmy Page. I rock.

 

 

First of all, the only albino in this house is ME!

 

Secondly, if you *were* Jimmy Page, I'd never let you out of bed. LOL

 

And lastly, to answer the question, before I started grad school, I bought a guitar and learned a few chords. I can only do about a half dozen chords and my rhythm is completely "boom-chick" but it's handy to have when I'm trying to write once in a while.

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