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Epi G-1275: Plywood?


mr. moon

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Hi,

 

I recently purchsed an Epi G-1275 "Limited Edition" doubleneck from Musicians Fiend, and once I opened up the back cover, I discovered that the "mahogany" is actually "mahogany plywood". On a $300 guitar, this would be ok, but not an $800.00 guitar, so it's going back (see photos at end of the post... It had some other rather significant defects as well, so there's no way I'm going to keep it. However, I am interested in the non-limited edition G-1275. Can anyone tell me if the alder used in the body is plywood, or is it solid?

 

Thanks!

 

-mr moon

 

 

plywood2.jpg

plywood1.jpg

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Man id be pissed too! hope you get what you want cos ply aint good at all imo!!

 

Nah, I'm not pissed, but the guitar is going back!

 

Anyways, I'm considering the standard G-1275 so if anyone can confirm that the Alder used in it (under the maple veneer top) is solid, I will move on it.

 

-mr moon

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The red one is also plywood... I know, I have one. But it plays and sounds gread so I kept it. But I was really pissed initually. They should write these details in the specs in their documentation and web site to be honest with the buyers...

 

In my case I needed that kind of guitar for certain styles of songs. The necks are fabulous and the guitar does play great. It does resonate but probably less than a solid wood body. Thats why you dont see the wood grain on the sides of the guitar. Only the front and back which are weneer...

 

So there it is...

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The red one is also plywood... I know' date=' I have one. But it plays and sounds gread so I kept it. But I was really pissed initually. They should write these details in the specs in their documentation and web site to be honest with the buyers...

 

In my case I needed that kind of guitar for certain styles of songs. The necks are fabulous and the guitar does play great. It does resonate but probably less than a solid wood body. Thats why you dont see the wood grain on the sides of the guitar. Only the front and back which are weneer...

 

So there it is...

[/quote']

 

Hmmmm... The Trans-red one I handled was solid "mystery mahogany" like the G-400s. Flame-maple-top veneer, fancy mahogany back veneer, and 2-3 piece mahogany body with grain showing on the sides. Just goes to show the inconsistancy of Epis.

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Hmmmm... The Trans-red one I handled was solid "mystery mahogany" like the G-400s. Flame-maple-top veneer' date=' fancy mahogany back veneer, and 2-3 piece mahogany body with grain showing on the sides. Just goes to show the inconsistancy of Epis.

[/quote']

 

Well if that's the case get it now! I looked at 3 of them and they all had the sides that were not sowing the wood grain... Mine is a 2007 model from Korea.

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Before ya'll work yourself up into a lather - do you know whether the body is made up of layers of solid hardwoods or layers of that cheap wood filler with a thin plate of good looking wood on top? There is a big difference between the two. And $800 for a double neck guitar ain't all that much scratch - at least when compared to the Gibson version which will run ya more than four times that amount.

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UPDATE:

 

Well, I got the standard G-1275 today and it's the same deal; plywood. Complete bummer. If it would have cost $200 or $300 I wouldn't care, but at the price they're charging for these, they should at least be solid wood ...like my $200.00 Epiphone LP Special bass. Two hundred bucks and it is solid mahogany.

 

 

Here are some shots as evidence, you can judge for yourself:

 

pickup1.jpg

 

pickup2t.jpg

 

back1d.jpg

 

side1y.jpg

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UPDATE:

 

Mr. Moon says in his update:

"Well, I got the standard G-1275 today and it's the same deal; plywood. Complete bummer. If it would have cost $200 or $300 I wouldn't care,

but at the price they're charging for these, they should at least be solid wood ...like my $200.00 Epiphone LP Special bass. Two hundred bucks

and it is solid mahogany."

 

If I were you, I'd go directly to Epiphone/Gibson USA and ask them what is their reason for building this model (G-1275) using this method. I'm sure

it takes more time to glue multi-layers of wood together than to just cut one single plank. Maybe the reason they do it is because you're dealing with

a guitar that's twice the size (we're talking a dual necked guitar here) and a plied body makes for a stronger piece of wood than a solid body. It's

a lot harder to crack that than a solid body of wood should you "accidently" drop the guitar. That may not be the main reason, but it's a good guess;

but maybe if you ask the manufacturer they can give you a legitimate reason.

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UPDATE:

 

Mr. Moon says in his update:

"Well' date=' I got the standard G-1275 today and it's the same deal; plywood. Complete bummer. If it would have cost $200 or $300 I wouldn't care,

but at the price they're charging for these, they should at least be solid wood ...like my $200.00 Epiphone LP Special bass. Two hundred bucks

and it is solid mahogany."

 

If I were you, I'd go directly to Epiphone/Gibson USA and ask them what is their reason for building this model (G-1275) using this method. I'm sure

it takes more time to glue multi-layers of wood together than to just cut one single plank. Maybe the reason they do it is because you're dealing with

a guitar that's twice the size (we're talking a dual necked guitar here) and a plied body makes for a stronger piece of wood than a solid body. It's

a lot harder to crack that than a solid body of wood should you "accidently" drop the guitar. That may not be the main reason, but it's a good guess;

but maybe if you ask the manufacturer [b']they can give you a legitimate reason[/b].

 

I think he's beyond wanting an explanation.

A complete loss of interest.

Moving on to the real thing.

Next!

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I think he's beyond wanting an explanation.

A complete loss of interest.

Moving on to the real thing.

Next!

 

Yup. Gonna move on to the "real thing". I hope someone from Epiphone will read this thread and realize that they lost a customer and a sale due to their cost-cutting' date=' pennypinching, miserly, cheap, and overall craptacular build/construction/materials quality found [u']in this instrument[/u].

 

...Not that I'm resentful or anything.

 

:^o

 

 

Hey, while we're at it, does anyone want to see the pix I took of all the other defects on the original (Alpine White) G-1275, which got me hundreds of dollars off the new Cherry plywood g-1275?

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