Gibson Guitar Board: Who makes Epiphone guitars ? - Gibson Guitar Board

Jump to content

  • (3 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Who makes Epiphone guitars ? the people and places, far away

#1 User is offline   crust 

  • Epiphone Enthusiast
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1929
  • Joined: 23-May 09
  • LocationBrockton, Massachusetts

Posted 13 October 2013 - 09:31 PM

I see my Epiphone guitars have been made in Korea, China and Indonesia. I often wondered to myself "who made this guitar" ? That "someone" is a person who obviously cares a great deal that their work was top notch. I wonder if Epiphone would ever "profile" their employees ? I think it would be interesting to know a little about the persons that make the guitars we all love (and hate), their luthier skills, if they own and play a guitar or 2 they or their friends might have built (can a person making an Epiphone guitar in China afford said Epiphone if they were inclined to obtain a guitar ) ? Just thinking out loud. How about the inspectors and USA set up persons. I wonder how many Epiphones, as recieved from the overseas factories, can't actually be "set up" properly. I wonder what happens to those guitars (if any), and if so, how does the USA set up and inspection person "get back" to the manufacturer, that there was an problem or anomaly . I do love my Epiphones, keep it up inspector #7. [thumbup]

#2 User is offline   'Scales 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 214
  • Joined: 13-March 13

Posted 13 October 2013 - 09:52 PM

not sure about China or Indo, but I'm fairly sure the Korean dude's name is Kim.

#3 User is online   Midtowner 

  • €pi Wiki Team
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 707
  • Joined: 11-February 13

Posted 14 October 2013 - 12:44 AM

View Postcrust, on 13 October 2013 - 09:31 PM, said:

I see my Epiphone guitars have been made in Korea, China and Indonesia. I often wondered to myself "who made this guitar" ? That "someone" is a person who obviously cares a great deal that their work was top notch. I wonder if Epiphone would ever "profile" their employees ? I think it would be interesting to know a little about the persons that make the guitars we all love (and hate), their luthier skills, if they own and play a guitar or 2 they or their friends might have built (can a person making an Epiphone guitar in China afford said Epiphone if they were inclined to obtain a guitar ) ? Just thinking out loud. How about the inspectors and USA set up persons. I wonder how many Epiphones, as recieved from the overseas factories, can't actually be "set up" properly. I wonder what happens to those guitars (if any), and if so, how does the USA set up and inspection person "get back" to the manufacturer, that there was an problem or anomaly . I do love my Epiphones, keep it up inspector #7. [thumbup]



Years back, they featured some of their employees here in the 'News section'

http://www.epiphone....s/Features.aspx

though it stopped at least 5 years ago...
...................Posted Image



Posted Image


#4 User is offline   bigneil 

  • British Watts are Louder !
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 2896
  • Joined: 26-March 09
  • LocationScotland

Posted 14 October 2013 - 02:19 AM

I wonder if the workers are paid a fair wage? and what sort of a profit Gibson make on every sale of an epiphone guitar?
Posted Image

Posted Image

All sparks will burn out in the end.

The Unoficial epiphone Wiki

#5 User is offline   bigneil 

  • British Watts are Louder !
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 2896
  • Joined: 26-March 09
  • LocationScotland

Posted 14 October 2013 - 02:27 AM

Here is a great article.
My link
Posted Image

Posted Image

All sparks will burn out in the end.

The Unoficial epiphone Wiki

#6 User is offline   jonnyg 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 818
  • Joined: 23-March 08
  • LocationSE England

Posted 14 October 2013 - 04:16 AM

View Postcrust, on 13 October 2013 - 09:31 PM, said:

Just thinking out loud. How about the inspectors and USA set up persons. I wonder how many Epiphones, as recieved from the overseas factories, can't actually be "set up" properly.

Actually, set-up is the bane of my life, not just Epiphones but the majority of guitars I try. Recently I was looking for a LP type guitar. I had the choice of an Epi or a brand called Vintage (in the UK). Both had plusses or minuses but there was not a huge deal of difference between them regarding general construction, cosmetics or sound. The biggest factor was that they both REALLY NEEDED a decent set up and that represents an extra cost (to me) of about £50.00. I don't buy enough guitars to warrant buying set-up tools at the price they sell for in the UK, neither do I really have the time to learn how to do it. I went with the Vintage because it was £100.00 cheaper. Had the Epi been better set-up I would have gone with that despite the higher price. It can be done though, because the Indonesian made Epi Wilshire I bought was almost perfectly set-up.
I've seen the same poor set-ups on lower end MIM Fender's, Squiers, PRS SE models and even the mighty Gibson.

Apologies for this being a little off topic.

#7 User is offline   Versatile 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 4022
  • Joined: 08-September 10
  • LocationUK

Posted 14 October 2013 - 05:05 AM

Rightly or wrongly, my perception of current Epiphones...

A great name with 100yrs+ history

Drawing on decades of 'parallel' development and manufacture in the US alongside Gibson

Separated at some point for economic reasons to offer affordable instruments to those unable to afford US made items

Large batch production...economies of scale...lower wage workforce...

Often 'same shape' as an equivalent Gibson at a fraction of the sale price... [thumbup]

IMO less individual attention given to each instrument(of necessity due to high volume production)

In general well satisfied customers

Analagous with the 'other big brand' Fender with it's alternative factory locations...

Yes it would be good to 'personalise' the manufacturing process by featuring individual workers...

The world moves on apace...we are more used to global sourcing of components in electronics etc etc...

V

:-({|=
Fiddling at the Pearly Gates
or somewhere
Lower and Warmer....

I like kayaking....it really floats my boat

I dig most stuff.......Anon(gardener)

#8 User is offline   crust 

  • Epiphone Enthusiast
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1929
  • Joined: 23-May 09
  • LocationBrockton, Massachusetts

Posted 14 October 2013 - 09:23 AM

View Postbigneil, on 14 October 2013 - 02:27 AM, said:

Here is a great article.
My link



yes it is [thumbup]

#9 User is online   Midtowner 

  • €pi Wiki Team
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 707
  • Joined: 11-February 13

Posted 14 October 2013 - 09:26 AM

New information from this year.....

Scott Aisenbrey: The Epiphone Interview

Scott Aisenbrey: The Epiphone Interview

As part of our ongoing 140th Anniversary series, Epiphone.com goes behind the scenes into the world of the Director of Operations--a world of planes, trains, & automobiles, nuts & bolts, and wood & wire that combine to make an instrument worthy of the House of Stathopoulo

Thanks for speaking with us, Scott. Tell us the story of how you got to Epiphone.

I was living in Los Angeles, playing music, and got a gig in Nashville. And so I packed up my stuff and came here. Three weeks later, the band got dropped by the record company but I decided to stay. It was, after all, a wonderful town for music and still is. And after about a year and a half, a friend of mine said: 'You should go talk to Gibson. They're looking for people like you who know guitars.' So, I filled out an application and about two weeks later, I got a job. And I haven't looked back since then!

How long was it before you came to Epiphone?

Basically, I got hired as a customer service representative. I was first assigned to inside- sales and after my third week, I got moved to Epiphone so I could deal exclusively with the Epiphone brand.

What is your job title today?

I'm the Director of Operations. I have responsibility for everything once the guitars are approved for production. From placing production orders all the way through until delivery to the final customer.

How has that changed over the last decade?

When I started, Epiphone wasn't the size we are now. And the systems that we had at that time were minimal at best. So, over the years, my goal--and that of our entire team--has been to make constant improvements. We developed our own systems and worked with factories to enhance their capabilities. Communications and the ability to move product around the world quickly has gotten much better as well. We want to make the best instrument at the best price and bring it to the market as quickly as possible. I've always enjoyed my job here because you always have the ability--and the encouragement--to make improvements. Quite frankly, Epiphone was one of the best marketeers when the brand first started and I think we've carried that tradition forward. There are a lot of innovations that Epi Stathopoulo originally put into the brand. And we try to live up to that tradition today as well. The history of Epiphone is spectacular and I'm happy to be able to contribute to it.

What is a typical day like for the Director of Operations at Epiphone?

I have to remember that even when my work day ends our business is world-wide and keeps going 24/7. We have offices in Asia and in Europe and of course the U.S. and due to the time differences, I'm getting information 'round the clock about production and distribution.

Most of what I see is data based on when product will be completed and ready for shipping as well as any questions the factory may have about specifications. Distribution centers also report back to me when they have received our instruments. I oversee the 24/7 monitoring of everything that's involved in getting Epiphone instruments made and transported.

How long does it take to make an Epiphone instrument?

The whole process of an instrument going on the line and coming off the line is usually three days, sometimes a little bit longer. I should mention that Epiphone has two factories in China that produce all of our premier product. A lot of other brands don't have that.

Were our factories built from the ground up?

The first factory was quite an interesting process because we procured ground in China and built the factory ourselves. We patterned a lot of the design on our Gibson factory. And from that process--building from the ground up--we learned a lot. It was really a wonderful experience. The second factory was originally owned by someone we had done business with for quite a long time. They wanted to get out of the business, so we bought that factory and restructured it to be more consistent with our first factory. The two factories are about an hour and a half from each other.

Is making an Epiphone instrument still a hands-on process?

Absolutely. Certainly we have fantastic machines to cut bodies and necks but once that's done, there's a lot of hands-on work. Many companies have tried to make a fully automated process but I can't see why we would do that at Epiphone. The attention to detail that our workers put into making an Epiphone instrument is tremendous. And I consider our workers as skilled as any in the world. Most importantly, our employees take pride in that process and it shows in the quality of our instruments.

You make regular visits to Epiphone factories. Why are those visits so important?

My visits help build and maintain relationships. That can't be done long distance. Yes, this is a business, but it's a passionate business. When I go around the world and watch our instruments being made, I also get to see and hear our instruments played on a worldwide stage. It's wonderful to see our instruments in the hands of musicians and know where it came from, what went into the building of that instrument, and to know that it's being played and appreciated. We have a huge range of products that we make. I don't know of any other brand that has the breadth that Epiphone does--from entry-level acoustics, to historic archtops, Les Pauls, mandolins and banjos and Dobros, and all at great price points.

How does an Epiphone travel from one side of the world to the other and arrive in flawless condition, ready to play?

A lot goes into that process. We have to pay close attention to the climate changes our instruments will go through during the processes of manufacturing and transit. We have to consider everything from how many instruments we're manufacturing at a time to how long it takes an instrument to arrive at our distribution centers in Nashville and around the world. Over the years, we've found the shortest way to run these routes. And we have quality teams set up in all the areas where our instruments may be shipped so we can go through each instrument before they are sent out to our customers.

How do you improve a process that's now become state of the art?

That's very difficult. As we discussed earlier, we're always looking for a better way of making a guitar. Les Paul is still our inspiration--how he worked in the Epiphone factory in Manhattan at night with the dream of building a new kind of electric guitar. If there is a better way, we at Epiphone want to discover it. We're always improving our instruments, delivery methods, and quality tracking. But in a way, all of those endeavors are easy. Our main job is to get a superb instrument into the hands of our customers so they can make magic. When that happens is when our entire team feels the greatest sense of satisfaction.

Are music retailers around the world still going strong?

In the United States, the neighborhood music store is struggling. Yes. Though online sales continue to grow, the whole experience of going into a music store is still exciting, especially for first time buyers and we value that relationship very much. And that is still the best opportunity to sit down and talk with a dealer, learn about Epiphone, and discover what instrument is best for you. That's a magical moment.

I believe that a big part of my job is to continue Epiphone's history of quality and innovation. We have a great history, great product, and a great worldwide team and they dedicate themselves to that idea everyday. I am a lucky guy, I love guitars and I have the joy of working here at Epiphone making iconic products everyday. PS - I play them too!!


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lloyd Williams and Scott Lewis: The Epiphone Interview

Lloyd Williams and Scott Lewis: The Epiphone Interview


Posted Image

Posted Image



more pics in the linked Interview


Epiphone's Lloyd Williams, Director of China Operations, and Scott Lewis, Plant Manager, oversee the day-to-day operation of building Epiphone instruments at Epiphone's factory near the northern coastal city of Qingdao, China. The idea of making Epiphones around the world is not a new one. In fact, founder Epi Stathopoulo had plans of his own to make Epiphone a world-wide manufacturer of quality professional instruments back in the late '30s just prior to World War II. Now in the 21st century, Epiphone has more than realized Epi's grandest dreams. In our continuing series honoring our 140th Anniversary, Epiphone.com spoke with Lloyd and Scott about their team in China, all of whom have been taught the secrets of building world class--and world famous, Epiphone designs. It's a unique factor with a unique mission: all Epiphones, all the time.

Scott and Lloyd, thanks for speaking with Epiphone.com. Tell us about what you do for Epiphone?

Scott Lewis: My initial role here in China was to bring my experience from two decades at Gibson USA to oversee all aspects related to production. This included training of our Chinese staff to adhere to processes and quality standards set by Epiphone USA as well as communicating on a daily basis with Epiphone staff on R&D related items like quality control, shipping and material supply chains.

I started working for the Impulse Division in 1988 located on Elm Hill Pike in Nashville producing Gibson's line of pickups and electronic assemblies. Two years later, I transferred to the main Gibson USA facility as I had a strong desire to learn more about the guitar building process. Through the years I was fortunate to work in just about every department from rough mill to final assembly in various capacities from machine operator, supervisor and plant manager. In 2005, I came to China to work for Epiphone and hooked up with Lloyd Williams to begin improving the operations in China to meet and exceed Epiphone's quality standards.

Lloyd Williams: Like Scott, I have been in the musical instrument manufacturing business for more than 20 years. I originally started with Baldwin piano company in Cincinnati, Ohio in the marketing department. I held a variety of jobs there and was serving as a production manager when the company was acquired by Gibson in 2001.

At that time, I moved to Nashville to work at Gibson's headquarters as a product manager under the Epiphone division. In 2004, I transferred to China full-time to oversee manufacturing operations. Currently, I am the Director of China Operations with the primary responsibility of overseeing the production of guitars as well as Baldwin pianos. I also work on a daily basis with our partner factories and suppliers to ensure Epiphone's high standards are maintained here in Asia.

Tell us about your life in China.

Scott Lewis: China has a unique culture that you have to adapt to achieve effective results. Like life in any foreign country, you sometimes need to change your way of thinking and adapt accordingly. From a cultural perspective since I moved here in 2005, I have seen the popularity and sales of musical instruments and specifically guitars increase dramatically. While piano's still have a larger presence in China, there are now more rock bands at the local clubs, bars and hotels than ever before. As a result, our China domestic sales continue to increase every year.

Lloyd Williams: The biggest lifestyle challenge for me when I first came to China was using chopsticks. I almost starved to death learning how to use them. But seriously, I enjoy Asian culture and the people and found that I adjusted to life here really easily. As to the revolution Epiphone is experiencing here in China, it is a beautiful thing to behold. Chinese culture is rapidly, becoming more open especially in the music scene. I watch a lot of music shows in person and on TV and it amazes me how many leading and upcoming artists are using Epiphones and Gibsons as their instrument of choice.

What are some of the advantages to Epiphone owning its own factories?

Scott Lewis: The two advantages that come to mind are having 45+ years of experience with Gibson/Epiphone between Lloyd and myself and our commitment to the Epiphone brand. Another major advantage is that we produce only Epiphone guitars, which allows us to focus 100% of our attention and our exclusive production techniques on one brand. Unlike other OEM or contract factories that produce for several brands. we are one family -- Epiphone only.

Lloyd Williams: This is a trick question, right? This is our company making our guitars. We are focused on making only the best guitars and only Epiphone guitars. It is our reputation that is at stake and we play to win. Epiphone controls the designs, development, manufacturing and quality 100% throughout the entire manufacturing process. You just can't get that through OEM factory production alone. A lot of guitar companies are trying to rely on OEM alone but not Epiphone. Our proprietary Epiphone designs are built by Epiphone employees and that really makes all the difference. While we do use OEM factories to extend our capacity, production is tightly controlled by a dedicated team of Epiphone quality technicians stationed onsite within these facilities.

Quality is a huge part of what we're about at Epiphone. Tell me about the significant changes and improvements that you've overseen.

Scott Lewis: Quality is #1, and to achieve that #1 status you must be efficient in every aspect of operations. We basically changed the entire footprint for production to mirror USA production in terms of flow and processes. As some processes may differ, such as binding and paint application, the end result is a great instrument. Currently, we are engaged in changing our finished goods and work-in-process system to emulate Epiphone USA's inventory tracking and bin location system. That will significantly improve our efficiency managing production but more importantly will allow us an additional level of QC inspection every step of the way. We are also in the process of making changes to our current designs for shipping boxes that will reduce transportation damage and be much more environmentally friendly.

Lloyd Williams: The most important thing any manufacturer can do is to institute and maintain a factory-wide philosophy that is focused on quality control supported by the use of only premium quality raw materials. If the factory is geared toward total quality control and uses the best materials available then manufacturing is relatively smooth and the end product will be world class. About 1 out of every 10 workers here are in a quality control position, which is very unusual in a manufacturing environment in Asia.

Tell us about the Epiphone employees who make our guitars.

Lloyd Williams: Wow, where do I begin? When a new employee starts on the line they are assigned a mentor. Depending on the skill level for their position they will apprentice from 60 days to one year. Once they have passed their apprenticeship and mastered their skills they in turn become mentors for the next new employee. But, we have very little turnover so most of our folks have been with us for years. All of our senior managers and supervisors started on the shop floor and worked their way up the old fashion way (like Scott) by learning to be master craftsmen with strong leadership skills.

We also have Epiphone Master Luthiers who are dedicated to teaching critical skills such as neck jointing, buffing and final setup. These are former line leaders who have the knowledge and skills of traditional guitar making and keep the Epiphone flame burning bright. Scott and I are extremely proud of our team and in return they are extremely proud to be part of the Epiphone family.

What are some of the new challenges you see for Epiphone in terms of manufacturing?

Lloyd Williams: For producing Epiphone future models the criteria is simple: build a guitar that a musician really needs. And second, build the guitar with unique features and benefits that the musician can really use to expand their musical horizons. Oh yeah, and while we are doing this we focus on quality, quality, quality. I personally hope we continue to resurrect Epiphone models from years ago and at the same time continue to innovate. Our biggest challenge is to continue to deliver the best instrument at the best value.

Do either of you have an instrument that is your personal favorite to see made?

Scott Lewis: My favorite instrument is the ES-339. The playability is unbelievable and the sustain is just pure pleasure to the ears. To be honest, any production of the hollow body instruments is an amazing sight to see as it is more than a just a block of wood and neck.

Lloyd Williams: Oh, I guess I would have to say any model with lots of multi-binding, metallic finish and is a bear to build. But seriously, I guess I am drawn toward the Casinos. To me they are the heart and soul of Epiphone. Oh... and Paul McCartney likes them, too! But I also bang on my old Epiphone AJ acoustic but that is just to annoy the cats outside my window.

We have a very informed and demanding audience. Quality is serious business, isn't it?

Lloyd Williams: Everything about making a quality guitar must be taken seriously! Though it is more fun compared to making a washing machine. But to answer your question, quality demands keep growing as more and more information is out there for review. I would have to say the biggest challenge is meeting the increased expectations of the customers. Dave Berryman, Jim Rosenberg, Scott Aisenbrey and Marty Burns keep us focused on what is needed in the musician's world so we have to be very responsive at the factory level. We seem to always be working on something new so there is a lot of collaboration back and forth between the big office and the factories. But hey, when you have an army of guitar fanatics back at the home office you can expect to be challenged on a daily basis.

Is there anything about the processes that you oversee that might surprise our audience?

Scott Lewis: Having worked at both Gibson and Epiphone, there isn't much difference in the basic processes with the exception of a few high end CNC's and few other minor variances. Epiphone remains true to what I would call a handcrafted instrument. Several of our processes today require hands on work that remains one of the most intriguing discussion points with touring guests.

Lloyd Williams: What really is unique about crafting Epiphones is that we are mixing 100-year old techniques with modern technology. Epiphone's engineers provide us with 3D drawings based on actual historical instruments for use in making our jigs and molds for many of the re-issue models. I remember when we tooled up for Casino production how accurate the shapes had to be and it took some time to get it spot on. We do use some automation but at the end of the day most of the work is done by hand. You are more likely to see our craftsmen with a chisel than pushing a button on some behemoth machine.

The guitar market is one of the most demanding markets in the world when it comes to quality. To be successful in this market you have to deliver the best guitar that can be made without exception. The passion shown by an Epiphone player is truly unique.





stolen from a buddy here

http://www.mylespaul...ne-history.html

[thumbup]
...................Posted Image



Posted Image


#10 User is offline   Lord Summerisle 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1342
  • Joined: 05-January 09
  • LocationThe lemonade springs where the bluebird sings

Posted 14 October 2013 - 09:37 AM

View Postcrust, on 13 October 2013 - 09:31 PM, said:

I see my Epiphone guitars have been made in Korea, China and Indonesia. I often wondered to myself "who made this guitar" ?


I'm willing to bet that the overwhelming majority of any Epiphone guitar is made by one "person" - Mr. C.N.C. Machine.

Not that that's a bad thing - I'd imagine that it's pretty much the norm for most guitars outside of high-end Fender and Gibson Custom Shop offerings, and guitars made by artisan luthiers, etc.

#11 User is online   Midtowner 

  • €pi Wiki Team
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 707
  • Joined: 11-February 13

Posted 15 October 2013 - 05:50 AM

View PostLord Summerisle, on 14 October 2013 - 09:37 AM, said:

I'm willing to bet that the overwhelming majority of any Epiphone guitar is made by one "person" - Mr. C.N.C. Machine.

Not that that's a bad thing - I'd imagine that it's pretty much the norm for most guitars outside of high-end Fender and Gibson Custom Shop offerings, and guitars made by artisan luthiers, etc.


Quote

Lloyd Williams: What really is unique about crafting Epiphones is that we are mixing 100-year old techniques with modern technology. Epiphone's engineers provide us with 3D drawings based on actual historical instruments for use in making our jigs and molds for many of the re-issue models. I remember when we tooled up for Casino production how accurate the shapes had to be and it took some time to get it spot on. We do use some automation but at the end of the day most of the work is done by hand. You are more likely to see our craftsmen with a chisel than pushing a button on some behemoth machine.



from the post above.....
...................Posted Image



Posted Image


#12 User is offline   Lord Summerisle 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1342
  • Joined: 05-January 09
  • LocationThe lemonade springs where the bluebird sings

Posted 15 October 2013 - 09:21 AM

View PostMidtowner, on 15 October 2013 - 05:50 AM, said:

from the post above.....


Sounds like blurb.

If Epiphone can turn out a mostly handmade guitar, in this case a Casino, which retails for only $599 and yet still allows sufficient profit margins for the manufacturer and its dealers...then people really are overpaying massively for instruments with more prestigious brand names.

I wonder what the profit margins are on a Casino compared to, say, a G-400 or a Les Paul? Interesting that for the "handcrafted instrument" blurb he focused on the hollow-body design - which seems fair enough. But for solid bodies...? I simply can't believe that a G-400 is "mostly made by hand". Perhaps the clue is in the statement about re-issues.

I was very wrong about one thing, though.

View PostLord Summerisle, on 14 October 2013 - 09:37 AM, said:

I'd imagine that [CNC machine manufacturing] is pretty much the norm for most guitars outside of high-end Fender...Custom Shop offerings


It turns out that Fender Custom Shop bodies are, indeed, fashioned on a CNC machine. We know this because the company that made the machine references its Fender contract in its own promotional materials:

http://www.haas.co.u...er-guitars.html

Fender has been quite upfront about the use of CNC machines since the late 1990s. Lots of discourse on forums amongst Fender adherents about distinguishing CNC machine marks on American Fenders from CNC machine marks on Mexican Fenders etc, etc (people actually worry about this stuff)? http://www.strat-tal...-cnc-holes.html Still, the Epiphone guy whose interview you posted talks about "high end CNCs," too.

I'm not really criticizing the Epiphone statements - at the end of the day they exist primarily for marketing purposes rather than informational ones. It's nice to see that there is still the notion of craftsmanship in the creation of these products. However, the statements are a little ambiguous and not really that specific...and I simply can't believe that the average Epiphone new from Qingdao is a mostly handmade guitar in the most literal sense of that term. There simply couldn't be any profit in the business if that were the case.

#13 User is offline   crust 

  • Epiphone Enthusiast
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1929
  • Joined: 23-May 09
  • LocationBrockton, Massachusetts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 09:46 AM

Thank you for posting the interviews here [thumbup] , good reading, great guitars

#14 User is offline   bobf_Sangiovese 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 821
  • Joined: 14-January 13

Posted 15 October 2013 - 10:12 AM

A point of interest for me while reading the articles is that there are no photos of people making/assembling guitars. The few photos there are, are of individuals holding parts up in front of stacks of stock or some such.

Where are the wide angle photos of the factory floor?

What are they HIDING? What don't they want us to see?
DISCLAIMER: If the post this is under appears to be my opinion or advice, ignore the post. My opinions aren't any better than anyone else's opinions and I'm not qualified to give advice. In fact, if I posted an opinion or offered advice it is likely because of boredom or temporary insanity. Occasionally I will post something that appears to be an opinion or advice, but in reality it is a thinly veiled quip or bit of sarcasm. There are times that demons, gremlins or even darker creatures use my ID and password to post here. I'm not sure how they get my password as I change it frequently. Thankfully this only happens rarely.

6th Anniversary ('99) Gibson Historic Reissue '57 Les Paul Custom Black Beauty
'07 Gibson LP Studio VM, worn cherry
Fender Modern Player Telecaster Plus
Peavey AT200, CA Red
Yamaha A3M
Blackstar HT5RH + Acoustic 4x12
Bugera V22
Digitech RP1000
THR10 <--- Very cool little box!

#15 User is offline   Versatile 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 4022
  • Joined: 08-September 10
  • LocationUK

Posted 15 October 2013 - 10:23 AM

The Casino is an interesting case in point(almost an anagram :blink:)

Possibly Epi's most desirable and profitable guitar...with big mojo and history...

Drawing on the US made ES330...retailing in the UK for around £1600 or so

The Casino can be had for £400 to say £800 depending on 'historic' spec and factory location...

Compared to Epi 335 Dots 'dirt cheap' and very popular for £300 or less...

V

:-({|=
Fiddling at the Pearly Gates
or somewhere
Lower and Warmer....

I like kayaking....it really floats my boat

I dig most stuff.......Anon(gardener)

#16 User is online   Midtowner 

  • €pi Wiki Team
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 707
  • Joined: 11-February 13

Posted 15 October 2013 - 10:47 AM

View Postbobf8332, on 15 October 2013 - 10:12 AM, said:

A point of interest for me while reading the articles is that there are no photos of people making/assembling guitars. The few photos there are, are of individuals holding parts up in front of stacks of stock or some such.

Where are the wide angle photos of the factory floor?

What are they HIDING? What don't they want us to see?


The links above shows pics of 'working employees' in both of their chinese factories
It's japanese or chinese - though the pics are 'international' [lol]

http://www.ikebe-gak...r/EQ.html#stock

Second ^^ factory, opened around 2008/9, called Epiphone QingDao (EQ)

http://www.ikebe-gak...ry-tour/GQ.html

First ^^ factory, opened in 2002/3, called Gibson QingDao (GQ)
...................Posted Image



Posted Image


#17 User is offline   bobf_Sangiovese 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 821
  • Joined: 14-January 13

Posted 15 October 2013 - 11:18 AM

View PostMidtowner, on 15 October 2013 - 10:47 AM, said:

The links above shows pics of 'working employees' in both of their chinese factories
It's japanese or chinese - though the pics are 'international' [lol]

http://www.ikebe-gak...r/EQ.html#stock

Second ^^ factory, opened around 2008/9, called Epiphone QingDao (EQ)

http://www.ikebe-gak...ry-tour/GQ.html

First ^^ factory, opened in 2002/3, called Gibson QingDao (GQ)


Those can't be the real pics. No chained employees ...
DISCLAIMER: If the post this is under appears to be my opinion or advice, ignore the post. My opinions aren't any better than anyone else's opinions and I'm not qualified to give advice. In fact, if I posted an opinion or offered advice it is likely because of boredom or temporary insanity. Occasionally I will post something that appears to be an opinion or advice, but in reality it is a thinly veiled quip or bit of sarcasm. There are times that demons, gremlins or even darker creatures use my ID and password to post here. I'm not sure how they get my password as I change it frequently. Thankfully this only happens rarely.

6th Anniversary ('99) Gibson Historic Reissue '57 Les Paul Custom Black Beauty
'07 Gibson LP Studio VM, worn cherry
Fender Modern Player Telecaster Plus
Peavey AT200, CA Red
Yamaha A3M
Blackstar HT5RH + Acoustic 4x12
Bugera V22
Digitech RP1000
THR10 <--- Very cool little box!

#18 User is offline   RTH 

  • €piphonewiki Team
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 4964
  • Joined: 28-May 10
  • LocationThe illusion of time and space

Posted 15 October 2013 - 11:19 AM

I never get tired of looking at those pics. And it looks to me that the process, other than shaping the guitar & neck, is all done by hand. Pretty cool. I have a nice big sanding divet on one of the horns of my Ltd Ed. '61 SG Special. Its not really noticable except in the right light, but it is surely proof of work done by hand and I like that. I suppose I could complain that the work isnt "hand crafted" enough on one hand, and on the other complain that there are too many inconsistencies. My only real complaint is the uneven fret leveling we have been seeing alot of from Epiphone Qingdao. But I'm sure they'll get better over time.
Posted Image




#19 User is offline   crust 

  • Epiphone Enthusiast
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1929
  • Joined: 23-May 09
  • LocationBrockton, Massachusetts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 11:54 AM

Personally, I think it is very cool that Epiphone has a factory dedicated to making only Epiphone guitars. I do like them all, all the models that are exclusively Epiphone's own as well as Gibson "copies". I'd also like to see some brand new models, something radical (but not as radical as a "map" or "airstream" guitar) [biggrin] . Where are some new designs ? How about a nice "thinline" classical or a semihollow, something like a Telecaster with an F hole, or something along the lines of a BC Rich...well not exactly, but where are the new features (not robot tuners) and 21st century designs, 7 and 8 strings ? I'd like a triple neck LP, 12, 6 and mandolin, made of "semi" solid wood (one "F" hole at each body)with proper switching options for drone and sympathetic tones. And, a custom crocodile hide case to put it in. Now, that would be cool. Do you think the Epiphone "Custom Shop" could live up to it's name's reputation and make something like that ?[thumbup] How about a double or triple neck lap/pedal steel guitar, that could also be a "custom shop" instrument...why not [smile] [mellow] [thumbup] [confused] ?

#20 User is offline   RTH 

  • €piphonewiki Team
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 4964
  • Joined: 28-May 10
  • LocationThe illusion of time and space

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:15 PM

View Postcrust, on 15 October 2013 - 11:54 AM, said:

Personally, I think it is very cool that Epiphone has a factory dedicated to making only Epiphone guitars. I do like them all, all the models that are exclusively Epiphone's own as well as Gibson "copies". I'd also like to see some brand new models, something radical (but not as radical as a "map" or "airstream" guitar) [biggrin] . Where are some new designs ? How about a nice "thinline" classical or a semihollow, something like a Telecaster with an F hole, or something along the lines of a BC Rich...well not exactly, but where are the new features (not robot tuners) and 21st century designs, 7 and 8 strings ? I'd like a triple neck LP, 12, 6 and mandolin, made of "semi" solid wood (one "F" hole at each body)with proper switching options for drone and sympathetic tones. And, a custom crocodile hide case to put it in. Now, that would be cool. [thumbup]


They already did a BC Rich - Rich Bi#ch design back in the early 1980's. It was wildly unpopular and I would love to list it in the wiki if only I could figure out what the actual name of it was. :-k
Posted Image




Share this topic:


  • (3 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

2 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 2 guests, 0 anonymous users