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I play blues: ES-335 or ES-175


Mike Postnov

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Hey guys, still choosing my way to go.

 

Having a descent Custom Shop Tele i can't stop wondering if Gibby could give me more taste and feeling.

 

I play B.B.'s kind of stuff as well as some fusion, so obviously I tend to the 335 side, but I can't help myself loving those fat classy look and feel of 175s.

 

I got one offer here of 175D, made in Kalamazoo in 1982 (one year younger than myself!) with original TIM SHAW pups... for the same price (around $3k) as a brand new Vintage Sunburst Custom Shop Es-335.

 

Soundwise thinking, I've heard those Tim Shaws are the best PAFs ever made, so in theory I can get those bluesy tones from Her, but what about technical aspects of playing blues on hollow body? I mean bends are harder to do etc?

 

Am tearing apart... HELP ;)

 

This is the link on ES-175D

 

This is the link on ES-335

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Hi and welcome to the forums... [thumbup]

 

Best way is to listen to other artists and choose accordingly

 

Anything involving hi gain would favour the ES335 for obvious reasons...

 

Then again...the Nuge plays monster stuff on his Byrdland... :blink:

 

IMO the ES175 edges things aesthetically...

 

So the answer as always is the ES137... [biggrin]

 

V

 

:-({|=

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A 335 will cover the blues a little better than a 175. You can play it nice and loud and it has more attack when you turn it up and play with distortion. 175's are more for playing softly and cleanly. More of a jazz guitar.

 

The iconic Gibson blues guitar is the 335. The 175 is a jazz icon. For what that's worth.

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A 335 will cover the blues a little better than a 175. You can play it nice and loud and it has more attack when you turn it up and play with distortion. 175's are more for playing softly and cleanly. More of a jazz guitar.

 

The iconic Gibson blues guitar is the 335. The 175 is a jazz icon. For what that's worth.

I basically agree, and this is probably the most helpful answer for most players, but there's also a style of blues (jump, swing, west coast, etc) stemming from the T-Bone Walker branch of the tree, where a full depth archtop is going to give you more of what you want (although single coil pickups are generally more associated with that style). It all depends on what style you're going to get into. Then again, it's more about the player than the equipment.

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I second Badblues motion. For blues you want a 335. The 175 is a jazz box. Also if your band is loud the 175 will give you feedback problems. I tried to play a 175 in my band for awhile and had to compress the guitar so much to avoid feedback it lost all it's tone nuances. Go with a 335 - they're great and it will work for you in a blues band.

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I basically agree, and this is probably the most helpful answer for most players, but there's also a style of blues (jump, swing, west coast, etc) stemming from the T-Bone Walker branch of the tree, where a full depth archtop is going to give you more of what you want (although single coil pickups are generally more associated with that style). It all depends on what style you're going to get into. Then again, it's more about the player than the equipment.

 

+1 on 175 for jump/swing blues. Some of the best blues I've heard in Hungary was played on a 175 copy (it would be sacrilege to treat a real 175 the way he treats his guitar towards the end of sets):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ryZ_xrsaxck

 

It also works well for slow blues:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkifZT6fmrI

 

But then you can use anything for blues and sound great; your man BB King played a 175, a full-body 125 and a Tele before his 355.

 

That said, if I were in your dilemma, personally I'd pick the 335 because I like the added definition that the centreblock and related sustain give it.

 

But what I actually have is a Howard Robert Fusion, which you might want to add to your list of things to try, along with Versatile's suggestion of the 137. The Howard looks a bit like a shrunken 175, but puts out like a 335, perhaps with a little added woodiness on the front pickup, because it's got a deeper body and a floating centreblock. The balsawood block in the MkIII version that I have makes it a good deal lighter than a 335, but it does still sustain. A great little semi which sounds great through a Fender amp.

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Another vote for the 335. It's just a smarter instrument for you to buy. And down the road, if you ever want to change your music, it'll let you do that too. 175 feedback is a major headache, and while I'd owned one for a long time, it only got played in my practice room.

Now that having been said, and you still want the 175 vibe, (( again, after buying the 335)) check out an L-4. It's hands down a better instrument than a 175. Same size, better appointments, but a solid top and ebony fingerboard for me make it a no-brainer. And you can usually buy a used one for even money vs a 175.

Once I bought my L-4, I wish I'd have done it sooner .

 

 

MHO FWIW

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  • 4 weeks later...

A 335 will cover the blues a little better than a 175. You can play it nice and loud and it has more attack when you turn it up and play with distortion. 175's are more for playing softly and cleanly. More of a jazz guitar.

 

The iconic Gibson blues guitar is the 335. The 175 is a jazz icon. For what that's worth.

 

Yep, what BadBluesPlayer said! Also ES-335 has less feedback and easier to play on the higher frets.

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  • 1 month later...

I've owned both and they're both great guitars, obviously. I kept the 175 strung with flatwounds and only used it for jazz. The 335 was great for blues, as well as rock, jazz, and anything else you'd want to play on it. If it were me and I was looking for a primary blues guitar, I'd go with the 335.

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  • 2 months later...

A 335 will cover the blues a little better than a 175. You can play it nice and loud and it has more attack when you turn it up and play with distortion. 175's are more for playing softly and cleanly. More of a jazz guitar.

 

The iconic Gibson blues guitar is the 335. The 175 is a jazz icon. For what that's worth.

 

I agree with Badblues. I own a 175 & a 335. I play in a jazz trio and for me I'd never use the 335 for the trio but would use my 175. I use my 335 when I play blues. Just my personal view.

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