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Cutting off nuts?


Andy R

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So what method of nut removal do you guys use when replacing a nut. I always cut the nuts through the center long ways so they collapse in and break the Glue bond. This seems to prevent wood breakage! Which as you know can be detrimental. Especially on an old guitar.

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So what method of nut removal do you guys use when replacing a nut. I always cut the nuts through the center long ways so they collapse in and break the Glue bond. This seems to prevent wood breakage! Which as you know can be detrimental. Especially on an old guitar.

 

 

I've always used the "take it to a luthiere" method myself.

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I wasn't going to click it, but then I was like someone did do a follow up post. Now, I am disappoint...

 

 

smiley-signs053.gif smiley-signs080.gif ......................smiley-signs097.gif Nathan, the thread is about being careful while cutting nuts, bonding glues, hardwoods, and proper nut repair... it's not easy..

 

To fix a broken nut is not easy.....try it.....

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On a more serious note, my girlfriend's method when replacing the one on my tele clone was to put a flat headed screwdriver against the end of the nut and give the handle a few gentle knocks which managed to push it out quite easily.

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Sorry to dissapoint everybody but this is meant to be a truly educational topic. I also realized that the information I started out with actually works better for a Strat style nut. It is also advised to use a nice fine tooth back cut saw to do so. Any way i thought I would apply the same question to a Gibson so it makes a bit more sense.

 

So say you have a vintage Les Paul that's (for the sake of argument) 50 some years old. And let's say that someone before you put a nut on it that might only be 16 or 17 years old or so. Now some people might not see this as a problem but others might feel that this isn't proper (since it isn't age appropriate to the guitar) and decide they should take some action to remedy the situation.

 

There could be a variatey of reasons why the person just doesn't like the 17 year old nut being attatched to such an older guitar. They could be un happy with the way the old Les Pauls String keeps slipping in and out of the slot. Could be that they just don't like the look of it. Maybe it is a bit sharp around the edges and just isn't a good match. Maybe they feel that a guitar that old should have a nut that is closer to its age ( to remain vintage appropriate) Regardless, who ever owns the guitar has some choices they can make to remedy the situation.

 

They could try applying some light pressure to the nut to see if it will detatch its self without putting up much of a fuss. This works sometimes but your lucky if it does and you still risk splintering and causing more issues

They could try to Gentley tap on it just to try to get it moving. But you might have the same consequences above.

They could try beating it with a hammer and screw driver ( not reccomended)

You could try applying some heat to the nut to hopefully loosen the bond between the nut and the guitar. This works fairly well

You could use an exacto knife and make a few in incisions around the neck of the guitar to get the nut to come off

Or you could use the method I mentioned above to cut the nut from the guitar

If the nut is really bonded to the neck you might just have to live with it and make the most of it.

 

I guess it comes down to your own style and how you deal with situations that can be difficult. Weigh the risks and decide which action or actions work the best.

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Sorry to dissapoint everybody but this is meant to be a truly educational topic.

Well....

 

Excuse the (CENSORED) outta me! +:-@

 

 

 

Chan - isn't this Da Lounge? [flapper][blink]

 

 

 

Feel free to edjamacate us at yer leisure, oh Great RectoraE2.

Sorry for the distraction.

 

[crying]

 

 

 

 

 

I've always used the "take it to a luthiere" method myself.

This - ^^^^^

 

I do lotsa work on my own guitars.

That's one job I refuse to do for a few different reasons;

 

1. It's CHEAP to have done by a professional. Can't swing $40 on a $$$$$$ guitar?

2. If a pro (CENSORED)s it up, I have some recourse.

3. I'm not skilled enough to file a nut properly, and I don't have the time.

 

 

 

You guys knock yerselves out.... [thumbup]

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Sorry to dissapoint everybody but this is meant to be a truly educational topic. I also realized that the information I started out with actually works better for a Strat style nut. It is also advised to use a nice fine tooth back cut saw to do so. Any way i thought I would apply the same question to a Gibson so it makes a bit more sense.

 

So say you have a vintage Les Paul that's (for the sake of argument) 50 some years old. And let's say that someone before you put a nut on it that might only be 16 or 17 years old or so. Now some people might not see this as a problem but others might feel that this isn't proper (since it isn't age appropriate to the guitar) and decide they should take some action to remedy the situation.

 

There could be a variatey of reasons why the person just doesn't like the 17 year old nut being attatched to such an older guitar. They could be un happy with the way the old Les Pauls String keeps slipping in and out of the slot. Could be that they just don't like the look of it. Maybe it is a bit sharp around the edges and just isn't a good match. Maybe they feel that a guitar that old should have a nut that is closer to its age ( to remain vintage appropriate) Regardless, who ever owns the guitar has some choices they can make to remedy the situation.

 

They could try applying some light pressure to the nut to see if it will detatch its self without putting up much of a fuss. This works sometimes but your lucky if it does and you still risk splintering and causing more issues

They could try to Gentley tap on it just to try to get it moving. But you might have the same consequences above.

They could try beating it with a hammer and screw driver ( not reccomended)

You could try applying some heat to the nut to hopefully loosen the bond between the nut and the guitar. This works fairly well

You could use an exacto knife and make a few in incisions around the neck of the guitar to get the nut to come off

Or you could use the method I mentioned above to cut the nut from the guitar

If the nut is really bonded to the neck you might just have to live with it and make the most of it.

 

I guess it comes down to your own style and how you deal with situations that can be difficult. Weigh the risks and decide which action or actions work the best.

 

As an added addendum to this I want also add the following bit of advice. Nut removal is serious business. Before you make any rash decisions concerning doing this yourself or for a friend please consult a qualified proffesional to ensure you are making a sound, rational well thought judgement. There could be other alternatives.

 

We don't want people running around cutting off nuts indiscriminately!

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