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In what order should these Pedals be?


swampash

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1CFD33B7-2596-435C-99E4-51E2F213BCCC-1579-00000181585D6633.jpg

 

Here is my new pedal board. Based on the picture above, what order should these pedals be placed in the chain to to get the very best from them.

 

From top right to left, the pedals are:

Electro Harmonix Big Muff, Belcat Analog Chorus, TC Electronics Polytune

 

From bottom right to left:

Electro Harmonix Micro Pog, Electro Harmonix Memory Boy, Belcat Flanger, Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer and Seymour Duncan Pickup booster.

 

The pedal outside the board is an Ernie Ball Volume pedal.

 

What do you think?

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1)Dynamic Range – Compression

2)EQ – Wah Pedal, Equalizer

3)Drive – Overdrive, Distortion, Fuzz

4)Modulation – Phaser, Flanger, Chorus

5)Time-Based – Reverb, Delay

 

Here is a basic framework of how you may want to first try setting up your pedals. BUT, you really should try setting them up different ways to find what might work best for you and for the pedals you are using.

 

As a general rule, tuners should go first. And I would recommend putting the delay before the reverb. And volume pedals are best used near the end of your signal chain.

However, some like their overdrive/distortion before the wah. Some like like an equalizer in front, some in back, and some right after distortion.

Just remember, there is no right or wrong way. Whatever seems to work best for you. [thumbup]

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1)Dynamic Range – Compression

2)EQ – Wah Pedal, Equalizer

3)Drive – Overdrive, Distortion, Fuzz

4)Modulation – Phaser, Flanger, Chorus

5)Time-Based – Reverb, Delay

 

 

This is how I roll, but you may find some pedals work better at different positions or you can get tasty weird sounds by changing positions.

 

I will add two comments too:

 

1. I like to put my dirt pedals in order from dirtiest to least dirty. My fuzz is first because if I run pedals before it, I don't get the oscillation when I turn the knobs.

 

2. You have to think about the signal and giving her a lift. I prefer to have true bypass pedals early and then give the signal a lift with a buffer pedal near the end.

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That chart is pretty useful, but a phaser is not a filter and would work best in the modulation spot. Plus it doesn't account for fuzz which is obviously the best type of effect.

 

Also, I encourage you to get really used to each pedal by itself and with how it reacts to others before you worry about chaining them all together. That way you'll really be able to put them in the order where they work best.

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3728871C-69D6-4443-B3DD-B2121DD1F7FF-864-0000011AD63C3C7C.jpg

 

Here is the final layout. I've also replaced all patch cables except one with Fender ones. I will be spending a bit of money on a good power supply next month. I'm pretty happy with the way it all sounds now, just what I was looking for. :)

Looks cool, but I would of put the volume pedal right before the echo, gives it that nice spacey violin effect when you turn the volume down.

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The very last thing in the effect loop should be a quality noise gate pedal. Not sure if you have one but they really "quiet things down" when playing live and recording. Depending on which order all these are hooked up,,they may be quieter in certain orders than others,but a Noise gate with this setup would be a good thing. And if you run batteries in them,,you may want to "hardwire" them,meaning use dc power supply for every one of them.Batteries sometimes go out sooner in some pedals,than others. If it was me,,Id run dc power supplys for all of these.

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That chart is pretty useful, but a phaser is not a filter and would work best in the modulation spot. Plus it doesn't account for fuzz which is obviously the best type of effect.

 

/chuckle

 

No.

 

A phaser is an audio signal processing technique used to filter a signal by creating a series of peaks and troughs in the frequency spectrum.

 

And Fuzz is most arguably NOT the best type of effect..... although I do appreciate your opinion on the topic. My very first effect ever was a Fuzz/Wah combo pedal. I'd love to have it back, but will do just fine with my over drive and distortion units. :)

 

 

Also, I encourage you to get really used to each pedal by itself and with how it reacts to others before you worry about chaining them all together. That way you'll really be able to put them in the order where they work best.

 

Excellent advice and something I overlooked! I do this with every new pedal and try a wide variety of settings to get an idea of what all it can do. If nothing else, it will help you in the future as you try and nail down various other sounds....

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/chuckle

 

No.

 

A phaser is an audio signal processing technique used to filter a signal by creating a series of peaks and troughs in the frequency spectrum.

 

And Fuzz is most arguably NOT the best type of effect..... although I do appreciate your opinion on the topic. My very first effect ever was a Fuzz/Wah combo pedal. I'd love to have it back, but will do just fine with my over drive and distortion units. :)

 

 

 

 

Excellent advice and something I overlooked! I do this with every new pedal and try a wide variety of settings to get an idea of what all it can do. If nothing else, it will help you in the future as you try and nail down various other sounds....

So a vibe pedal is similar in placing it before the dirt boxes as it is similar to a phaser? I've discovered that having the vibe and or a phaser before the dirtbox to have the best transparent sound.

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So a vibe pedal is similar in placing it before the dirt boxes as it is similar to a phaser? I've discovered that having the vibe and or a phaser before the dirtbox to have the best transparent sound.

 

 

Well, that IS why I recomended trying them out in various combinations to see what sounds best to your ear. A Phaser sounds different when placed at the beginning of the chain than it does if it is the last effect in the chain.

 

 

Just my .02 worth, but.... if you follow the same path everyone else has, you'll likely end up with the same sound. If you think about it, most of your favorite guitar players have an easily distinguishable and unique sound.....

 

 

:-k

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1)Dynamic Range – Compression

2)EQ – Wah Pedal, Equalizer

3)Drive – Overdrive, Distortion, Fuzz

4)Modulation – Phaser, Flanger, Chorus

5)Time-Based – Reverb, Delay

 

Here is a basic framework of how you may want to first try setting up your pedals. BUT, you really should try setting them up different ways to find what might work best for you and for the pedals you are using.

 

As a general rule, tuners should go first. And I would recommend putting the delay before the reverb. And volume pedals are best used near the end of your signal chain.

However, some like their overdrive/distortion before the wah. Some like like an equalizer in front, some in back, and some right after distortion.

Just remember, there is no right or wrong way. Whatever seems to work best for you. [thumbup]

 

 

I'd agree except that I was taught to put anything that increases the harmonic content (overdrives) before EQ based effects, so the EQ has more to work with. I'd go 1,3,2,4,5

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