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Advanced Jumbo thoughts?

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I recently ran into someone whom has an advanced jumbo for sale. Did not have time to play it, but was wondering you guys thoughts on it compared to the other high end gibsons like the Hummingbirds, J-45 and Southern Jumbo. Out of all, i think the 45 sounded the woodiest, is the AJ the brightest? i dont think i would consider maple backs bright because they sound mellow to me but not woody if that makes sense? Anyhoo, after selling my j-50 regrettedly last summer, im looking at Gibson acoustics again. The Southern and Advanced Jumbos hold particular intrigue because my guitar center never has them, only hummingbirds and j200s which are fantastic, but im just curious what you guys think of the Advanced since i can only hear on youtube. Thoughts?

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Most AJ's are rosewood, not maple. The maple and rosewood versions are different animals.

 

They are also long-scale, unlike the other Gibsons you mention.

 

Play before you buy.

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Yes, long scale, and typically, rosewood. Might be a bit redundant if you already have the D-28, but it would be an interesting compare with the square shoulders of your Martin. The AJ's are known as powerful sounding, and if you don't watch it, brash.

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AJs are something of a unique beast in the Gibson canon. A cannon in the canon if you will!

 

I’m off to the US in three weeks to pick up my Maple AJ from Wildwood in Colorado. The Maple AJs I’ve played have been huge sounding, with a big low end growl and a top end that can trim your eyebrows at 30 paces. A very characterful and dramatic instrument.

 

The Rosewood AJ i owned was a harder creature to tame, very nice tone but required a very precise pick attack to get an even response. I enjoyed it but never bonded with it on a long term basis as I’ve always been more of a Maple player by nature and preference.

 

They’re a classic though, and a vital and fascinating part of Gibson history. Everyone who is passionate about Gibsons should own one at some point!

 

I wouldn’t describe them as bright, more BIG. The Rosewood AJs can tend towards being a little cold sounding, but in an interesting and musical way. The Maple examples I’ve played have been an absolute party for the ears.

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I had a walnut AJ. Very loud and I never had a guitar rumble like it did. Sold it to a Blue Grasser who loves it.

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Most AJ's are rosewood, not maple. The maple and rosewood versions are different animals.

 

They are also long-scale, unlike the other Gibsons you mention.

 

Play before you buy.

Turns out it wasnt an aj, it was an aj pro. From what i could tell no binding, different pickguard, and graphtech nut instead of bone.

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Turns out it wasnt an aj, it was an aj pro. From what i could tell no binding, different pickguard, and graphtech nut instead of bone.

 

I believe the AJ Pro was a Guitar Center exclusive, and didn’t have the forward shifted bracing of the standard AJ, quite a different guitar by all a counts, a bit like the Hummingbird Artist which was a similar GC exclusive. Nice guitars, quite niche and could be collectjble in the future.

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8 years ago I didn't know of the Advanced Jumbo. When finding out it existed I had to get both a J-45 and an AJ. Was hunting the 45 already.

Got the 2 home and played them back and forth for about a year, maybe less. Very different animals indeed.

The AJ impressed me with it's power and directness, , , but the 45 surprised me with it's magical charm.

The first was canon - but the hog was not a work-horse, , , it simply wasn't. Maybe a free running stallion.

The 45 was much more sophisticated than that - so velvet-like and with a bass out of this world.

 

Presented them for my friend. He too was beyond doubt. In fact so mesmerized by 45 that he shortly after got one himself.

Btw. a Historic Collection a good deal older than my 2010 Standard.

And again something totally different/third, , , , much more polite and lady-like than mine (he bought long distance without bein' able to test).

 

Ergo - further to a slide blues-player went the AJ (he still has it) while the new slope hog stayed here (still have it).

 

Best thoughts - not the artillerist, , , neither the cavalryman, , , but the riding black-nut poem-smith.

 

 

 

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An AJ is rosewood, not all the other tone woods. I've got a Koa AJ, but it's not an AJ, aside from the name. It's a splendid guitar (lots of volume and an awesome fingerpicker) and I've had numerous compliments on its sound and two offers to buy it, but I really like it and I'm keeping it. BUT, it's not an AJ. It's one-hell-of-a Gibson acoustic, but it's not an AJ. Not looking to offend anyone, but it's not an AJ. I'll likely still get one of those.

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An AJ is rosewood, not all the other tone woods. I've got a Koa AJ, but it's not an AJ, aside from the name. It's a splendid guitar (lots of volume and an awesome fingerpicker) and I've had numerous compliments on its sound and two offers to buy it, but I really like it and I'm keeping it. BUT, it's not an AJ. It's one-hell-of-a Gibson acoustic, but it's not an AJ. Not looking to offend anyone, but it's not an AJ. I'll likely still get one of those.

 

 

You raise an interesting point. If Martin built a D-28 out of koa (or maple, or something else), would we still consider it a D-28?

 

Of course, Gibson built some banner J-45's out of maple, and some with mahogany tops, during WW2. Are those still J-45's? And what about the banner FON 910 rosewood SJ's, among the rarest of all. Are those SJ's, or something else?

 

Not sure where you draw the line on this stuff. Maybe, like beauty, it's in the eye of the beholder.

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You raise an interesting point. If Martin built a D-28 out of koa (or maple, or something else), would we still consider it a D-28?

I'm almost sure Nazareth would.

The fine Martin dread w. walnut b/s I played at an acoustic exhibition a few years back was called a 28.

Maybe something like Martin D-28 style Walnut / Koa / etc. .

 

After all it was the 28, not the 18 that became the icon, the blueprint, universal template, , , , the symbol.

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I have a 2008 Dove...Maple sound is bright and loud. 2 2018 Gibson's: Hummingbird a mahogany very focused, mid range. Last week the Advanced Jumbo, made in March, arrived! An incredible loud with a deep bass sound. They are all 3 different results. You just have to play them all to decide what you sound you want.

 

Here I am yesterday with my 2018 AJ with my friend Davis Neely the great guitar luthier for many great guitar legends for the past 45 years at his Sunset Blvd Hollywood shop.

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I have an '06 AJ and will confirm the others' opinions that it has a strong, dark sound etc. I use it for bluegrass - very different sound than a rosewood Martin. If the AJ descriptions sound appealing, go for it - it may not be a lifetime guitar, but I guarantee you won't regret having one for a while. Although it has a Gibson-quality to the sound - mine has sort of a growl - it doesn't sound like any other Gibson product.

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I have a 2008 Dove...Maple sound is bright and loud. 2 2018 Gibson's: Hummingbird a mahogany very focused, mid range. Last week the Advanced Jumbo, made in March, arrived! An incredible loud with a deep bass sound. They are all 3 different results. You just have to play them all to decide what you sound you want.

 

Here I am yesterday with my 2018 AJ with my friend Davis Neely the great guitar luthier for many great guitar legends for the past 45 years at his Sunset Blvd Hollywood shop.

Helo Radio - just for fun. In case of fire or desert island what do U bring ?

Yes, I know it's hard.

A do elaborate over the 2 Birds if you please. .

 

 

Edited by E-minor7

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Gibson makes J-45s, and everything else, out of everything but salami and they call them by name, so I would say a koa or maple AJ is still an AJ. And Martin does build custom shop D-28s out of all kinds of body woods and they don't stray far from the name.

 

I have a fairly unusual AJ called a luthiers choice, which features Adirondack top, hide glue top and body construction, and a bigger neck, along with the long scale and forward-shifted (advanced) bracing. It's a fantastic and versatile instrument, as I believe AJs tend to be all around. I don't like the stupid pointy fretboard inlays, but I can't see them when I play, so it's a small issue. I can't imagine being dissatisfied with an AJ, unless it just came out wrong.

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I’ve always found the standard AJ to be one of the least “Gibson-y” acoustics in the range. It has a direct power which reminds me of an HD28. In my mind, the Gibson tone is the warm, plummy Mahogany tone of J45s and Hummingbirds, and the big, bold, articulate Maple tone of 200s, 185/180s, Doves etc.

 

The Maple “AJs” (I tend to agree on the model misnomer, but it is what it is) sound to me like a warmer Dove with the mighty projection and directness of an HD28/35. Absolutely great guitars. Can’t wait to collect mine in a couple of week!

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Damnit, I'm seeing Maple AJs now on reverb, I have a rosewood, a hog .....

 

I played one in Glasgow last year that was pretty much the best new acoustic I’ve ever played. absolutely amazing guitar. Missed out on that one as I didn’t have the readies but am off to Colorado in two weeks to collect one from Wildwood. Excited is a massive understatement!

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There was a small run of AJs with maple bodies, adirondack tops, short scale, and the wider Luthier's Choice necks a couple years back.

 

Red 333

Edited by Red 333

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There was a small run of AJs with maple bodies, adirondack tops, short scale, and the wider Luthier's Choice necks a couple years back.

 

Red 333

Short scale maple AJ? Now that does start to give a guitar an identity crisis. Humble Red, though- in remembering and scaring up one of the more stunning AJ's posted here, it turns out that Mr Red has/had one of these anomalies (the SSMAJ). Any observations on the guitar would be more than welcome.

 

Not trying to fuel the anticipation too much for poor Jinder, but the guitar image that got me searching, Guth's Birdseye with bursted back: http://forum.gibson.com/index.php?/topic/81950-landed-a-custom-shop-aj-birdseye/

 

 

vhwSezP.png?2

 

 

Wishing I was in Colorado for an a/b with Jinder's future AJ, as this one, which makes me wonder how the supply of good rosewood for fretboards is holding out, will be soon coming up for sale, as I'm looking for that elusive non-red Hummingbird Quilt:

 

FrYDRrT.jpg?4

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I’ve always found the standard AJ to be one of the least “Gibson-y” acoustics in the range. It has a direct power which reminds me of an HD28. In my mind, the Gibson tone is the warm, plummy Mahogany tone of J45s and Hummingbirds, and the big, bold, articulate Maple tone of 200s, 185/180s, Doves etc.

 

The Maple “AJs” (I tend to agree on the model misnomer, but it is what it is) sound to me like a warmer Dove with the mighty projection and directness of an HD28/35. Absolutely great guitars. Can’t wait to collect mine in a couple of week!

True, the aj is more like a Martin, but i had a j-50 that really was the Gibson sound i think, and i have to say i REALLY regret selling! it was one of those times where i got sick for a while and could not work. But, i know the guy who owns it, he collects vintage gibsons. He has a 1970s hummingbird, a 64 southern jumbo and an old beatdown 125 from 50s. At least i know its in good hands. The AJ Pro seems like it should be named something else, without the front bracing and bone nut wouldnt that take away a substantial amount of volume?

Edited by Gibson Artist

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I am not sure why you guys think an AJ​​ PRO is a short scale.It has 25.5" scale length according to Gibson website.

http://www.gibson.com/Products/Acoustic-Instruments/Round-Shoulder/Gibson-Acoustic/Advanced-Jumbo-Pro/Specs.aspx

 

I own one.Got mine for $1,250 off reverb.I have compared my AJ PRO and a standard AJ from my friend.it's like comparing standard bracing D28 VS. scalloped/forward shifted bracing HD-28V.They both sound good on their own way.

Smart_Select_Image_2018-06-06-18-33-09.png

 

But when I compared an AJ PRO to my SJ which has everything almost the same.Round shoulder,Sitka over Rosewood,X-Bracing except SJ has short scale length.I like the SJ better.It's like J-45 on steroids.It's Rosewood guitar that sounds like Mahogany and I don't know why.

20180114_015505.jpg

 

**Edit** Another thing that AJ PRO different than the rest Gibson round shoulder Dreadnaught is that it has belly down bridge like D28.

Edited by jimmyboy

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