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btoth76

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Hello!

 

Some time ago I did those picks from 5 Forint coins (one-fifth of a US cent). In the recent days, I've refined the idea. Drilled some holes through them to get a better grip on them (the tip used to rotate away from the strings), and polished up the edges with 2000-grit paper.

 

HPIM4275_zpsb9779faf.jpg

 

Using them, I get better articulation and attack. Easy to make them, they are even cheaper than any branded stuff (if this counts at all). The more I punched the coin with the mallet, - obviously - the thinner and larger it got. The smaller the pick, the harder picking attack You can achieve, although on the expense of playing accuracy. The one in the lower right corner seems to be ideal for me.

 

I recommend making one of these for those, who don't like the muddiness of the neck pickup on a Les Paul. You can get clearer and more pronounced notes with them.

 

Cheers... Bence

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Cool looking picks, btoth. Interesting how much picks can affect your tone, and that is a great point about how certain picks can clean up your sound and articulate strings. I have found that Dunlop Stubby picks can do the same thing. I can get what I call a "glassy" sound with them. They're the same size as a Jazz III.

 

mphjOffOpp4jqfBSAMy1mhw.jpg

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Hello Zigzag!

 

Very true!

 

I couldn't get the perfect tone with the plastic picks I've tried yet. I kept on buying thicker and thicker picks. Ended up with the 2mm thickness. It was fine tone-wise, but it's cumbersome. It harmed my accuracy. Now, - with these - I have picks that are completely rigid, but very thin. That's very comfortable for my picking hands.

 

Cheers... Bence

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Hello!

 

Some time ago I did those picks from 5 Forint coins (one-fifth of a US cent). In the recent days, I've refined the idea. Drilled some holes through them to get a better grip on them (the tip used to rotate away from the strings), and polished up the edges with 2000-grit paper.

 

HPIM4275_zpsb9779faf.jpg

 

Using them, I get better articulation and attack. Easy to make them, they are even cheaper than any branded stuff (if this counts at all). The more I punched the coin with the mallet, - obviously - the thinner and larger it got. The smaller the pick, the harder picking attack You can achieve, although on the expense of playing accuracy. The one in the lower right corner seems to be ideal for me.

 

I recommend making one of these for those, who don't like the muddiness of the neck pickup on a Les Paul. You can get clearer and more pronounced notes with them.

 

Cheers... Bence

 

I like the traditional weight relief... [thumbup]

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I like the traditional weight relief... [thumbup]

[lol]

 

Nice idea about drilling them to add 'grip', Bence.

I bought a few of the solid-wood tear-drop picks to use with my Gipsy-Jazzer but they were far too smooth to hold so I took a tenon saw to them and made a criss-cross pattern which worked well.

 

As far as the electrics go I've been using these since about 1980. This actual one I've been using since about '87;

Reversedetaillo-res_MG_8175Large-1.jpg

 

Sterling Silver. Very pure and, therefore, rather 'soft' for a metal so the edge smooths-off to give a lovely surface for picking. 15mm in diameter, BTW.

 

P.

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Hi,

I'm currently using Carbon Fibre Jazz 111 picks. I quite like them.

 

Ian.

 

I use the large traditional Jazz III. I'd try the carbon fibre ones but I have only ever seen them advertised in the small format over here in the UK.

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I use the large traditional Jazz III. I'd try the carbon fibre ones but I have only ever seen them advertised in the small format over here in the UK.

Yes, they are small. I've always had problems keeping hold of picks, but for some reason I don't have a problem with those, I really like them.

 

Ian.

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I have always used a wide variety..

 

I use brass thin..copper..and silver..

I use Herco and Dunlop .88s

I made some from a lava stone..and even a piece of petrified wood I "obtained"..

 

Sometimes for the tone difference and sometime to change the feel

 

Sometimes just gets me out of old habits..or excited my playing..

I Combination pick too..

 

Just helps keep it all fresh

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Is that solid silver then?

 

Here's my pick pic...including stainless steel, silver Queen Victoria sixpence, brass Teckpick, ebony, the big agate teardrop is a "Min'd pick" as advertised in the back pages of Guitar Player in the 80s, and more - all surrounded by Jazz IIIs and variations.

I have lots more somewhere but only use the hard picks these days.

 

Picks2013_zpscf4bbdaf.jpg

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