Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Tool question


surfpup

Recommended Posts

I have a question for those of you with tool smarts...

 

I don't have a router but I have a drill press. I'm wondering if I can use a router bit on it to rout a pickup hole in a guitar body.

 

 

In my opinion no.

The drill chuck in a drill press does not run true enough which would probably make your work want to move around and give bad results.

Also spindle does not rotate fast enough for a router bit and a drill press spindle is made for downward force where as a router is made for lateral or side force.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my opinion no.

 

Also spindle does not rotate fast enough for a router bit

 

The Dremel is a better option, but you'll need to go a little depth at a time. Dremels are not strong enough to route deep channels in hardwood. I have done this with a Dremel, and what I did was make a template guide for the Dremel cup attachment thingy to follow, therefore leaving the proper size/shape hole for the pickup.

 

BUT...... I think it's time to buy a router! A "plunge" type router is best for this.

 

I would still recommend use of a template/guide and ball bearing guided cutting bit. Stew-Mac sells the guides, and probably has a instructional video.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Dremel is a better option, but you'll need to go a little depth at a time. Dremels are not strong enough to route deep channels in hardwood. I have done this with a Dremel, and what I did was make a template guide for the Dremel cup attachment thingy to follow, therefore leaving the proper size/shape hole for the pickup.

 

BUT...... I think it's time to buy a router! A "plunge" type router is best for this.

 

I would still recommend use of a template/guide and ball bearing guided cutting bit. Stew-Mac sells the guides, and probably has a instructional video.

 

Thanks - maybe it's time to bite the bullet and just buy a plunge router as you say. I'm sure other uses for it will pop up. [thumbup]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks - maybe it's time to bite the bullet and just buy a plunge router as you say. I'm sure other uses for it will pop up. [thumbup]

Yeah, I have both a router and dremel tool.. The dremel I use for fine work but for the heavy stuff you need a router to do it properly really..

 

Luckily they arnt super expensive...

 

From my experience.. I first bought a REALLY cheap one, like £30 or something.. And it lasted about a year... The problem I had with it is the plunge action got real sticky and in the end was causing me to muck the work up badly... So the next router I got ( I think it was more like £70) I made sure it was one that has like rubber tubing around the plunger legs.. This stops the dust getting in and making it jam up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My stuff is so old it could probably classify as "vintage" but I will say this. I haven't done a lot of woodworking in decades, but if you've never used a router before...PRACTICE ON SCRAP WOOD!! Those babies can have a mind of their own!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

..PRACTICE ON SCRAP WOOD!! Those babies can have a mind of their own!

 

Wise advise from a man who obviously has used one.

Make a jig. Free hand can be hell.

 

But Surf.. If you do stick that bit in your drill press be sure to video it for us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I were needing to buy a router, I would look on EBAY for good used Porter Cable.

 

There are a lot of good routers available, but which one? I couldn't say.

 

None are made in the USA right now. Traditionally, to the best of my knowledge, the top brands were Porter Cable and Bosch.

 

I would lean toward Porter Cable, because even though they are made in Mexico, the parts and pieces are compatible with the American made ones. Parts, bases, motors are very available and easy to get and interchangeable with each other. That's where you will get your value.

 

Not only are there lots of American made ones on EBAY (used, of corse), but Porter Cable routers and parts are most likely the easiest to be stocked by local tool shops or repair places.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah - a drill press won't work. It rotates way too slow.

 

I have a router just like that Bosch one that I use for my roundover work. You can use it one-handed, which is handy. The depth adjustment mechanism is excellent - very stable and accurate compared to others I've had. I have had others, including a Porter Cable plunge type and a Dewalt. I really like the Bosch because it's easy to handle.

 

You can plunge it freehanded but you'll need to practice first. Or use a drill bit to get started. And once you get it moving, just make sure you're moving the router in the same direction as the bit is cutting. [thumbup] [thumbup]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you can find it, get one with a built-in light.

 

Go over the same spot too much or go too slowly and you'll end up burnishing the wood.

Go too fast and risk damage and possible bodily injury. Take too large a bite and you'll find it hard to control.

 

If you don't have a good bench that will allow you to anchor the work there is a mat product made for that purpose.

You can substitute rubber mat used for lining toolboxes instead if necessary.

 

Don't forget to protect the finish from being marred or scratched by the router's baseplate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lots of great advice - thanks all. I've decided to take my time an do this right, so I'll be purchasing a router and making or buying a pickup template. This won't give me the instant gratification I had hoped for but it may have saved me from mangling the job. [biggrin]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lots of great advice - thanks all. I've decided to take my time an do this right, so I'll be purchasing a router and making or buying a pickup template. This won't give me the instant gratification I had hoped for but it may have saved me from mangling the job. [biggrin]

 

 

Doing this way (the proper)till you get good at it is the best thing you can do.. [thumbup] [thumbup]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We do a fair amount of woodworking with building custom home theaters (I also like to build furnature too). Some of the best bang for the buck routers have always been a "ol' reliable" Porter Cable 690. No plunge but you can purchase a plunge base and have both. I also have a soft start plunge Porter Cable (think it's a 3 hp maybe. Very nice piece for plunge work and the router table I use a bunch.

 

Bosch makes a nice router as well. A plunge router takes a fair about of practice (esp. to free hand use). Soft start keeps it from jerking as much. You can also use (I have one too) a foot pedal (like a wah-wah [biggrin]) that you can vari-speed as you use and work it like a soft start. The P.C. 690 is one of the best work horse routers for the money by far and most serious woodworkers have one that they always fall back on when free handing. Just my 2 cents worth. A good quality router is a GREAT tool. With practice you can do some good work very fast. Don't scrimp on the bits either if you want clean cuts. Also learn about which way you cut (start & stop based on wood grain direction).

 

Aster

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lots of great advice - thanks all. I've decided to take my time an do this right, so I'll be purchasing a router and making or buying a pickup template. This won't give me the instant gratification I had hoped for but it may have saved me from mangling the job. [biggrin]

Yep... to get a clean line you really need templates...

 

And as others have said you need to make sure you move it around at a good but steady pace or you get burn... AND you have to move it in the right direction...

 

Basically if your routing around the outside of an object you need to go counter clockwise but if your routing around the inside you go clockwise

 

Also don't try and take off too much at one time or you will get nasty tearaway and it can make the router fly off... which is very disconcerting when that happens.

 

rout-right-direction-img1-large_zpsf8196d11.jpg

 

router-20cut_zpsf1e54b90.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep... to get a clean line you really need templates...

 

And as others have said you need to make sure you move it around at a good but steady pace or you get burn... AND you have to move it in the right direction...

 

Basically if your routing around the outside of an object you need to go counter clockwise but if your routing around the inside you go clockwise

 

Also don't try and take off too much at one time or you will get nasty tearaway and it can make the router fly off... which is very disconcerting when that happens.

 

rout-right-direction-img1-large_zpsf8196d11.jpg

 

router-20cut_zpsf1e54b90.jpg

 

I know nothing about working with wood. But this is the opposite of working on a mill with steel. As a machinist, I'm almost always trying to "climb mill" the part I'm working on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm really interested in machining and want to expand my horizons with metal work in a couple years (after I leave day to day with my businesses). You really aren't working with "grain" with metal (again, ignorant here with my thinking about metal so correct me if I'm wrong). Wood grain direction really affects the cutting of wood esp. with "shaping" or "molding" of wood. Easier cutting with grain and you have to be careful of end splitting when cutting edge grain. Easy to work around, just like everything else, a technique improves outcome.

 

Pup, if you are going to be limiting your use mainly to opening up simple things like a pickup opening (esp. one that is mostly done less some larger sizing needed), you may want to just use a smaller trim/laminate router like the Bosch the BB Player mentioned I think it was. With a template I would rather use a smaller router and take less material off per pass. Rabs is sure right about going too slow or too fast. Outcome not great either way. Steady and right speed makes for a super clean cut with a really sharp cutter bit. Porter Cable makes a nice little trimmer too. I'd get either the Bosch or P.C. without hesitation.

 

Aster

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...