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My New 1964 Gibson LG1 with Photos!!!


Taylor Player

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I posted these in the nice Birthday thread that GG started for me, but realize that probably was not the best place to post photos and review my little present to myself. I have been playing it now since Friday and thought I would tell the story and add my comments and photos in a new thread.

 

I have been GASsing for a vintage Gibson for sometime now. Over the last couple years, every time one hit the local craigslist, I was thinking, what can I trade for that.... Well finally a very reasonably priced 65 LG1 appeared. It had had the bridge changed out to wood, bone saddle, pins and nut installed and also included a pickup. It basically was calling my name everytime I logged onto Craigslist. The owner did not want to trade as he needed the cash for a Mesa Boogie amp he wanted. So I put my newest guitar, my Taylor GSMC, on Craigslist and after a couple scammer emails and a couple lookie loo's, I was able to sell my Taylor within about a week for cash. I drove straight over and bought my new LG1!!!

 

This guitar was purchased by the prior owner from a pawn shop in Kentucky in the early 80's after he graduated High School. He then moved to Ireland for a few years and ended up playing in a couple local bands at pubs and such. Since returning to the States, he has performed with this guitar all over and including some of the nicer venues in Minneapolis where I live. He now was going full electric and also had purchased a new Martin recently, so his beloved LG1 was on the block. I found the guitar hanging on the wall in his old drafty house. I am just guessing, but I assume it has not been properly humidified ever, but everything still looks solid, even when scoping out the inside with a mirror.

 

I could tell that he really didn't want to sell this baby, especially when he asked if he could play it once more before I took her away. I assured him it would be well taken care of and played daily.

 

I love the quote I have seen around here that says something like "It can't play the blues if it ain't been in a Pawnshop". Well this guitar has exactly the Blues tones as well as Celtic tones I have been hankering for. These are the dry, woody tones that no Taylor will ever be able to produce. Taylors are wonderful guitars, but I would describe their tone as "Pretty". Even my Gibson AJ has a very pretty, sustained voice. This Old LG1 sounds like a beautiful woman's voice who was a smoker after way too many years of Camel no filters..... low, sweet and sexy!

 

Here are some photos of my new find..... Enjoy!!!

 

LG1Front.jpg

 

LG1Back.jpg

 

LG1Closefront.jpg

 

LG1Standing.jpg

 

LG1Neck.jpg

 

LG1Headstock.jpg

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Congrats! I can guarantdamtee you you will be happy with your LG. I had a 64LG1 I bought new up until 2 years ago when I gave it to my son. They have a unique sound, light touch and are really well built. Of course, there is the plastic bridge thing - but that only makes them more unique. I had mine 30 years before I realized it wasn't wood! Enjoy the plunky, funky sound! jim

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Congratulations Paul! What a great story. My heart hurts for the guy who had to let it go, but you're right, it's in good hands now and he should be happy for that. I love your description of its tone! Someday I'm going to get an old Gibson..... I'm still looking. We never see guitars like that on Craigslist up here. Any acoustics get snapped up in a nanosecond. The only reason I got Elmo (the Epi) is because I was watching that site religiously and hopped on it as soon as the guy posted.

 

Anyway, enjoy your b'day present!

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Taylor Player' date=' nice guitar, great story, how is the action?

 

Fred[/quote']

 

Actually the action is quite good all the way up the neck and the intonation is not bad at all. The neck is a full 1 11/16" at the nut but feels very much like my AJ's neck with the shallow C type profile. The problem that I do see is that there is little to no saddle on the high e and b strings. Tells me at some point she will likely need a neck reset. I know that my guy is very good with vintage Gibsons so I will have an outlet when that is necessary.

 

Joe, as for the strap pin.... I haven't removed it yet. I figured when I do let my tech get a look at it, he will remove it and put one on the bottom of the heel like I like. But I don't see this little guy needing a strap at all much. It is going to be my couch noodling, deck party guitar that will get played sitting down. Maybe I should just take it off? What to do with the hole that is left?

 

My wife actually agrees that this guitar is "All me"! It just seems to fit the stuff I play and has actually led me into some new alleys with DADGAD just since yesterday! Who knew Norwegian Wood was in DADGAD?!?!?!?! I just stumbled on that one this morning playing around on the LG.

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Thanks for all the nice comments everyone.....

 

Karen, don't worry, it has taken me 2 years of trading to be able to locate and find an LG1 that was not only affordable but playable as well. Patience is a virtue and this Gibson was well worth the wait. Keep your eyes on the prize and you will find a nice old Gibby for yourself someday. Didn't your Mom have an LG1?

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  • 2 weeks later...

I just got a 1966 gibson LG1, the condition is good, the old Kluson turner keys hold the strings good. but I think the action is little bit higher, so I want to adjust the neck a little bit, what should I use to adjust it, and where can I can the tools or kits?

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Hi co2fish...

 

Congrats on your new/old Gibby! You will have to post some photos for us!!

 

As to your question, I am not sure of the size nut driver you need for these old Gibsons, but my tech knows as he has worked on thousands of vintage guitars. That said, typically the neck adjustment (truss rod) is not what you should do to adjust for high action. That is best taken care of by sanding down the saddle or adjusting the nut height. The truss offers the neck some relief and can make a minor difference with action, but you don't want to adjust it too much where you could snap the truss rod. I don't mind making small (1/8 to 1/4 turns) when needed sometimes for changes in the seasons here in Minnesota, but with this Gibson, I am going to have a good luthier/tech take a look at it. I think at some point mine will be needing a neck reset. I took a yardstick and when straight dow my fretboard and crossed to the bridge. Mine lines up just a hair below the bridge which means that the neck is likely slightly off. The yardstick should line up with the top of the bridge (not the saddle). On mine, the saddle is already sanded down to a point, I could not take any more off or the high e string would be laying on the bridge. In fact, I added a little piece of a credit card to shim up the action slightly until I have my tech make a new saddle and nut for mine. I plan on investing the money to have it fixed, even if it needs a neck reset as I got it for a great price and it would be worth putting a few hundred $ into it.

 

I took a couple of new photos of mine over the weekend when temps actually got close to 70 degrees in Minnesota and I could play outside on my deck....

 

lg1Bench.jpg

 

lg1Bench2.jpg

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Thank you for the very friendly reply, Taylor Player !

 

so I took some photos about my LG-1 to thank you.

 

[don't you thing my 66's LG-1 very must like your (the color) ]

DSC01671.JPG

 

DSC01673.JPG

 

DSC01670.JPG

 

DSC01668.JPG

 

[do you have any idea what is the number"2" stand for]

DSC01669.JPG

 

[what do you thing about my LG-1's action]

DSC01664.JPG

 

[I thing the bridge probably cause my lg1's action going up, it bulges a little bit, but it still seems steady.]

DSC01665.JPG

 

 

Anyone have any advice to my LG-1?

 

=========================

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Hi co2fish...

 

That is a great looking one. (I posted in your other thread with the phogos too.) I like the sunburst color the best on these. (I already have the tobacco burst on my other Gibson so they look cool sitting next to each other!)

 

As for the "2" on the back of your headstock, I am not sure. Mine has the whole serial number stamped in the back of the headstock and it looks like yours does also above the number 2?

 

I wonder if the 2 doesn't stand for "Factory 2nd" like they do when the guitar has a small flaw but it still saleable? Others may know more about that on old Gibsons.

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I wonder if the 2 doesn't stand for "Factory 2nd" like they do when the guitar has a small flaw but it still saleable? Others may know more about that on old Gibsons.

 

I think that the "2" does stand for second.

 

Certainly my norlin J45 was a second and has a damn big hole in the back of the headstock where some twerp gouged the "2" out.

 

I recall the venerable KSD's Dove recently renovated which was similarly marked.

 

I also recall KSD's comments which were to the effect of "what the hell does it matter to know that a 40 year old guitar was a second"

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  • 8 years later...

It is generally understood that the 2 means any of the following:

 

1). It is a factory second in that it has a minor flaw in likely the wood pattern, but still was otherwise built to completion to factory specs.

 

Or

 

2) it was originally built by a factory employee for their own personal use.

 

Or

 

3). It was built to be a demonstration guitar.

 

According to George Gruhn, the vintage guitar guru, the still semi mysterious 2 on the back of the headstock does not reduce the vintage guitar price in the collector market, per what I have read.

 

Hope this helps!

 

QM aka Jazzman Jeff

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