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vintage?


chris.

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Old enough that the people that knew it sucked are either dead or don't care so the re-issue frenzy can begin.

 

rct

 

^ [lol]

 

If it's a Les Paul and was built between 1952 and 1960 I'd classify it as 'Vintage' with a capitalized 'V'.

 

A '93 Studio I'd classify as, ermm, a '93 Studio....

 

[biggrin]

 

P.

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^ [lol]

 

If it's a Les Paul and was built between 1952 and 1960 I'd classify it as 'Vintage' with a capitalized 'V'.

 

A '93 Studio I'd classify as, ermm, a '93 Studio....

 

[biggrin]

 

P.

fair enough hahaha but what about in 20 years? does my paul ever get a class upgrade? or does it always stay a 93 studio?

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Any guitar from 1972 and older IMO

so i guess here is my real question if you were alive and playing and buying guitars in the fifties well then thats before 1972 and current model guitars cant be vintage so vintage is not a set list is it? eventually new things today will become vintage at some point, so is it 30 years 40 years? how old does something have to be to be considered vintage?

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.

Seems like sometime in the last couple decades the words vintage and antique got mixed together - referring simply to the age of the piece. Actually, the way most people use the word "vintage" in relation to guitars, the word "classic" would be a good synonym. In this case it doesn't matter exactly how old the guitar is (although some would say at least 25 years old), "vintage" refers to a guitar that is old and is recognized for build quality, sound quality, design, historical importance and buyer interest. The more of these vintage aspects a guitar has, the more expensive it can be. Of course, condition will also effect the value.

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.

Seems like sometime in the last couple decades the words vintage and antique got mixed together - referring simply to the age of the piece. Actually, the way most people use the word "vintage" in relation to guitars, the word "classic" would be a good synonym. In this case it doesn't matter exactly how old the guitar is (all though some would say at least 25 years old), "vintage" refers to a guitar that is old and is recognized for build quality, sound quality, design, historical importance and buyer interest. The more of these vintage aspects a guitar has, the more expensive it can be. Of course, condition will also effect the value.

 

I think this is a pretty good description of the (mis(over(ab)))use of the word "vintage".

 

I will quibble with you Mr. Kahune over the following:

"vintage" refers to a guitar that is old and is recognized for build quality, sound quality, design, historical importance and buyer interest.

 

Much of what qualifies a "vintage" and gets stupid vintage money asked for it is not very well built, sounds likea ss, was designed by morons, has historical importance only to the seller because at it's actual time in history everyone hated it and wanted a strat or tele or les paul, and has buyer interest only because it is somehow Kewl to use "vintage" guitars.

 

Other than that, I agree completely!

 

rct

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Wikipedia:

Vintage, (def)

1. Vintage is a process in wine-making.

 

2. Vintage is also a term used to describe something as old or antique.

 

Antique: (def) An antique (Latin: antiquus; old) is an old collectible item. It is collected or desirable because of its age (see definition), beauty, rarity, condition, utility, personal emotional connection, and/or other unique features. It is an object that represents a previous era or time period in human society. It is common practice to define "antique", as applying to objects at least 100 years old. Collectibles are, generally speaking, the possible antiques of the future and generally less than 100 years old.

 

The only real law concerning the definition of the word antique comes from the US customs office, that considers antique as anything 100 years old.

So, where does that leave my 1985 LP ? [confused][crying]

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Wikipedia:

Vintage, (def)

1. Vintage is a process in wine-making.

 

2. Vintage is also a term used to describe something as old or antique.

 

Antique: (def) An antique (Latin: antiquus; old) is an old collectible item. It is collected or desirable because of its age (see definition), beauty, rarity, condition, utility, personal emotional connection, and/or other unique features. It is an object that represents a previous era or time period in human society. It is common practice to define "antique", as applying to objects at least 100 years old. Collectibles are, generally speaking, the possible antiques of the future and generally less than 100 years old.

 

The only real law concerning the definition of the word antique comes from the US customs office, that considers antique as anything 100 years old.

So, where does that leave my 1985 LP ? [confused][crying]

it leaves it as pure gold in about 70 years :)

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.... Much of what qualifies a "vintage" and gets stupid vintage money asked for it is not very well built, sounds likea ss, was designed by morons, has historical importance only to the seller because at it's actual time in history everyone hated it and wanted a strat or tele or les paul, and has buyer interest only because it is somehow Kewl to use "vintage" guitars. ....

 

One of the aspects of "vintage" I mentioned is buyer interest. There's no accounting for taste. Someday interested collectors my send the price for a vintage Hello Kitty sky high. [lol]

 

41WXVNKo7WL.jpg

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One of the aspects of "vintage" I mentioned is buyer interest. There's no accounting for taste. Someday interested collectors my send the price for a vintage Hello Kitty sky high. [lol]

 

41WXVNKo7WL.jpg

hmmm i think i might stock up on 50 dollar first act guitars ill be rich in 50 years [flapper]

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If we are talking about guitars then we are using the word as an adjective. Here is a dictionary's definition of the word in such a context;

 

"...vin·tage (vibreve.gifnprime.giftibreve.gifj)adj.

1. Of or relating to a vintage.

2. Characterized by excellence, maturity, and enduring appeal; classic.

3. Old or outmoded."

 

 

Whilst I was being slightly tongue-in-cheek with my previous reply I'd still stand by it.

 

Any LP built during the first ('52 - '60) period would be termed 'Vintage'.

 

From the time of their re-introduction in 1968 I would classify them either by the year in which the guitar was made or a general description such as "...during the 'Norlin Years' ".

 

Personally I'd never consider the 'second-run'-on guitars as being truly 'Vintage'. They are all are just 'Old' to a greater or lesser degree.

 

A '93 Studio, as I said, will always be a '93 Studio. It might be thought of at some time in the future as an example of a classic guitar but would never acquire the status of being a 'Vintage' Les Paul.

 

P.

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The only real law concerning the definition of the word antique comes from the US customs office, that considers antique as anything 100 years old.

So, where does that leave my 1985 LP ? [confused][crying]

 

36-and-counting....

 

More seriously; if you are intent on including the word 'vintage' when you describe it then I'd suggest; "...my '85 vintage Les Paul..."

 

P.

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If 'Vintage' means roughly the same as 'antique', my great uncle had a wise view of antiques:

 

"An antique is either something that didn't work well enough, or no one liked well enough, to wear out."

 

 

 

At what age? About 25 years, I guess.

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