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E-minor7

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Thought it was time for a little game from this camp. Had an extra 15 minutes in front of the mics yesterday nite and brought out a guitar.

 

Question for you all is which one ?

I did the same piece, first fingerpicked then flatpicked. The engineer had some new gear he wanted to test, so he chose the set-up. We agreed to keep it neutral and use as little as possible, but I asked him to add a minor touch of reverb. He used :

Neumann KM184 Stereo Pair

API 512 Preamps – no EQ or comp.

 

I'm tuned half a step down and play 12's (14 days old).

 

Feel free to comment - All kinds of responses are welcome - And have a good time guessing.

 

Engineers link - http://soundcloud.co...05/which-gibson

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I love these sort of games, and normaly always get em wrong.

 

But here's what Im hearing. The first guitar to me souneds like a slope shouldered J-45, i would say a well played in one as when you hit a couple chords it had a bit of that dry, vintage tone. Also i can hear the J-45 midrange focus in the playing.

 

Second guitar I would guess as a square shouldered Gibby, a Hummingbird or squre shouldered SJ. Much more open, lush tone, not as much focus on the midrage.

 

Both guitars sounded splendid however and lovelly pickin' there Em7 [thumbup]

 

EDIT: made a mistake in that i meant second sounds like a J-45 and first like a HB.

 

EDIT: just realised its the same guitar played with fingers then pick ...i should read the intro more often ..... hmm, then Id say its a J-45, sounds too bright on the treble side for a squre shouldered Gibby..... :unsure:

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I wish you had given us some to choose from! It's obviously a big body, and it sounds like mahogany to me. You've got the action set really low, which seems to quiet it down a bit. I can't tell if it's a 'bird or a J-45 (or old SJ), but I'd have to go 'bird, even that style of playing goes beautifully with a J-45.

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Thought it was time for a little game from this camp. Had an extra 15 minutes in front of the mics yesterday nite and brought out a second guitar.

 

Question for you all is which one ?

I did the same piece, first fingerpicked then flatpicked. The engineer had some new gear he wanted to test, so he chose the set-up. We agreed to keep it neutral and use as little as possible, but I asked him to add a minor touch of reverb. He used :

Neumann KM184 Stereo Pair

API 512 Preamps – no EQ or comp.

I'm tuned half a step down and play 12's.

Feel free to comment - All kinds of responses are welcome - And have a good time guessing.

 

Engineers link - http://soundcloud.co...05/which-gibson

 

 

I'll play. Do we get to keep the guitar if we guess right?

 

If you 'brought it out', do I take it is one of yours? If so, I've lost track of what you've got by now. The square-shouldered SJ I remember, the newish J45 I remember, otherwise, I've forgotten. Or is this open-ended? Whatever it is it (and your playing) sounds great.

 

To my ears, it's not mahogany (so it probably is!). Thereafter, I'm lost between rosewood and maple. I think I hear overtones in the bass, so lean towards the first, then I think I hear great clarity and cut in the trebles, so lean towards the second. I should therefore return to mahogany, because it may lie somewhere between maple and rosewood, yet somehow it just doesn't growl at me. Not what I consider classic slope J45 territory, but I've heard recordings here where slope 45s did sound that way, and sound great in their own way. If yours is the wild horsey you say it is, I'd expect growl, and more of it even than the rural workhorse gives it, but perhaps you associate all growl with ruralism. To me it doesn't have the thumping bass of a classic sloper, which I can also hear on mid-sixties Stones acoustic recordings (As Tears Go By, Play with Fire), so I'd also be ruling out the square-shouldered hogs on first listen. If maple, then there is enough whack in the bass for me to think big, so 200. If rosewood, then it could be anything, but fingerpicked it sounds big enough for me to have double-checked where the flat pick came out. So any square-shoulder rosey, but a really nice one with plenty of middles to it. So I can talk myself into anything here. In the end though, perhaps I'm confusing volume in the trebles with clarity. And while the mids are definitely there, it's the bass and trebles which really strike me, which ought to mean rosewood.

 

So as a guess (forgetting what you have in your collection at present), I'd stab at a Songwriter Deluxe.

 

Which probably means it's your J45. Or your SJ. Or an SJ200.

 

Damn. I won't get to keep the guitar.

 

EDIT:

All EA has to say is that he hears midrange, even if he also hears two guitars, and I start hearing mahogany. I even start hearing some growl, but not as on my Woody. More controlled. Could well be your J45. This plus Nick's stab at bird also sends me back to your square SJ. And Diamond has me back on maple, though I'm still thinking big! Not hearing rosewood any more! I don't care. It sounds really good. I only want to get it right so that I can win the guitar!

 

EDIT 2: If I get this right with my first guess, I need my hearing checked. If I get this right with my second guess, I also need my hearing checked.

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Yay some fun[tongue] Have to agree with the first guesser above about part

as when you hit a couple chords it had a bit of that dry, vintage tone.
which is either hoggish or maple. Highs had a bright maple like cut, mids a little withheld but airy Q width. So my guess is a jumbo of sorts. My guess is a 185 :mellow: if you own one?! It was the same guitar in both picks? V nice 'high lonesome pickin' by the way:)
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Well first thing is, I want to hear more...

 

I don't think maple or jumbo, but I think rosewood and will say AJ (if you got one) or possibly SWD (though for some reason I wouldn't expect a SWD to shine so well on the finger-pickin'...but what do I know?[mellow] )

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I'll play: sounds like mahogany to start with, and your playing sounds like how I want to sound on my J-45 [thumbup], so I'll go with J-45.

 

Also, it sounds like your bridge pins have been replaced with ivory, your nut is graphtech, and your pickguard has been moved outside the rosette. But that's just to my ear. [wink]

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Well first thing is, I want to hear more...

 

I don't think maple or jumbo, but I think rosewood and will say AJ (if you got one) or possibly SWD (though for some reason I wouldn't expect a SWD to shine so well on the finger-pickin'...but what do I know?[mellow] )

 

Oh, now I'll start revising back to my original idea. Anne is always right on these things!

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Well now that Ive had a chance to hear it again through decent speakers at home rather than though the headphones at work I can definitely see an argument here for rosewood. The bottom is really thick and rich, very rosewood territory, significant amount of overtone.

 

I dont really hear a SWD here though, but would not be surprised if it could be an AJ.

 

Or of course ... it could be just all about mike placement ..

 

Oh, now I'll start revising back to my original idea. Anne is always right on these things!

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Thank you all for participation, responses and listening in. It's been fun to follow.

 

What we hear is the 2008 Hummingbird TV.

 

Yes, I know it wasn't obvious, which is one of the reasons this one was chosen. I had the guitar since last summer and decided to keep it at least a year to see how it opens. And so far things are growing. It's more loose now and the volume (thus bass) has become stronger, but, , , , still it isn't the birdiest Bird I have heard. As this unmasked test might show, it's not as honeyglazed as others out there in the big world. For several reasons it's easy to see why some of you could be mislead.

 

Although I've tried a good one I don't know much about SWD's, but let me say that the/my black nut Standard* would have sounded quite different. More delayed/imprecise/boomy in the flatpicked piece - when fingerpicked the projection would have sounded like coming from a deeper chamber – more room, so to speak. In case this had been a real recording or acoustic jam, the choice would have matched EA's idea in post 2.

 

*Have to keep in mind my 2010 is louder, less tight and 'roomier' than f.x. Historic Collections and other contemporary's I've met.

 

An AJ, , , mmmm perhaps – but wouldn't the bass be different under the pick. . . .

 

All in all this Bird isn't a keeper yet. Still much too good and intriguing a guitar to just pass on. The process onwards must be witnessed.

Time will tell – you can't hurry dices in mid air.

 

To add further thoughts on the sound, those of you who talked 'bout plenty of mids are right, I think. The bass speaks up when punched, same with trebs and there are a lot of different touches in the takes, some harder some softer. Maybe the hog-factor is found there more than in the actual tone, , , though I know some of you sensed rose. In fact this is a very balanced instrument and actually there is more nectar than heard, when the strings aren't so crisp and relatively new (14 days).

Overall I could need more deep end. Might come.

 

And for the basic recording, it's too digital to my ears (only emphasized by the SoundCloud MP3 format) – but as stated in post 1, this was about the naked sound of the Gibson. The camp here would never leave it like this test as it needs atmosphere/texture, , , some help to support the warmth and cover up the digital cleanness.

Not that the basic guitar (in this somewhat restless performance) sounds bad, no no no.

 

I'll try to find time to treat it with some tube-comp. and EQ and post the result like an A/B later. That would be worth doin'.

 

Once again thanks for joining – Best Regards, your weekend Game Host

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Interesting, so it was the Bird after all. Certainly in hindsight one can now hear it more clearly.

 

Although a bit must be said how much of a difference simple miking and recording appraoch can have to the tone. As I said in my first post the first recording sounded like a Bird while the second more like a J-45 as it was much cripser, but then found out it was the same guitar !

 

Anywya, Em7, if you ever think of parting with this beauty drop me a line ..

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Hah! Del Nilppeznaf and I claim the win. Back to the woodshed for the rest of you.

 

As your penance, you will play scales for 10 hours straight, without stopping to play a blues in E to remind yourself of why you love Gibsons. [biggrin]

 

:rolleyes:

 

haha

lucky guess my end..tho it did sound a lot like my 'Bird so there was some method too...

 

time to blue some blues (edit)?????

 

I mean play some blues [blink]

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