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Static charge on new Gibsons Static charge on new Gibsons

#1 User is offline   premiumplus 

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 09:40 PM

Dear Gibson,
In 2015 I bought a nice SG, the standard model that went for around 1400 dollars. It's getting better with time, but it had horrible static issues.
This year my wife bought me a 2017 Firebird T and I absolutely LOVE that guitar. But I can't move my hands up and down the neck or move the guitar against my clothes without hearing the snap crackle and pop of static discharge. I've done everything to eliminate it. Rubbing with dryer sheets helps for a bit, but they leave residue behind.
What's going on? Is it the fact that you charge your bodies with a negative charge to attract the paint, like powder painters do? I know it will go away with time, but it's frustrating as hell to spend this kind of money and get an instrument that you can't really crank and play hard without getting the pops of static discharge.
Frustrated in Swartz Creek Michigan...
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#2 User is offline   Johnny 6 String 

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 09:52 PM

View Postpremiumplus, on 10 January 2018 - 09:40 PM, said:

Dear Gibson,
In 2015 I bought a nice SG, the standard model that went for around 1400 dollars. It's getting better with time, but it had horrible static issues.
This year my wife bought me a 2017 Firebird T and I absolutely LOVE that guitar. But I can't move my hands up and down the neck or move the guitar against my clothes without hearing the snap crackle and pop of static discharge. I've done everything to eliminate it. Rubbing with dryer sheets helps for a bit, but they leave residue behind.
What's going on? Is it the fact that you charge your bodies with a negative charge to attract the paint, like powder painters do? I know it will go away with time, but it's frustrating as hell to spend this kind of money and get an instrument that you can't really crank and play hard without getting the pops of static discharge.
Frustrated in Swartz Creek Michigan...



Hey premium;

The static as you mentioned I think is likely being aggravated by lack of humidity in the winter air, don't think your Michigan winters are too different than here in Canada and the air is brutally dry right now. If possible I'd try humidifying your environment and see if that helps. Avoiding synthetic shirts while playing could also reduce the static.

Powder coating charges the powdered paint and the parts painted must be grounded to attract the paint. Liquid automotive paint is also charged in most OEM applications.
Wood can not be grounded and Gibson does not charge their nitro, it is applied with a conventional spray gun.

Hope that helps.

Johnny
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#3 User is offline   SocProf 

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 12:05 AM

I hear that dry air can cause some fretboards to crack. Yes, humidifiers are a must for guitar owners in most climates.
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#4 User is offline   NighthawkChris 

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 01:02 AM

This is ridiculous... well every time I get out of my car and touch the door once my foot touches the ground, I need to write a letter to the OEMs to prevent this static electrical discharge from happening. You didn’t have to start out with “Dear Gibson”... that’s just dumb.
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#5 User is offline   FZ Fan 

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 07:01 AM

Dear Readers of this Page:

The dry air and cold weather during winter months cause an increase in static electricity in your home, causing your clothes to stick and your hair to stand on end. What is static electricity all about and why is it worse in the winter?

Why it's worse in winter

Normally in the summer, the humidity in the air helps dissipate these negative charges. During the winter months, there's less water in the air and charged objects are more likely to be dissipated by your touch. Here are some ways to minimize your encounters with static electricity in your daily routine:

Home remedies for static electricity

  • If you have a humidifier in your home, raise the humidity level. The water particles emitted from the humidifier will quickly break up the static charges throughout objects in your home. If you don't have a humidifier, you can boil water on your stove and add a spice like cinnamon or citrus to help reduce the static charges nearby. Indoor plants are another great way to bring moisture to your home.
  • Your carpet can act as a main conductor for static electricity. Socks or shoes rubbed across the carpet create large amounts of static electricity. Static Guard is a commercially sold product that fights against static on carpet, however, mixing one cap-full of fabric softener into a spray bottle full of water will produce the same effect. Shake the mixture and spray lightly on carpet for static protection.
  • Nothing can be more frustrating than static clinging to your clothes. One solution is using dryer sheets to minimize the amount of fabric contact during the drying process. If your clothes are already washed, rub dryer sheets on them to reduce the amount of static.
  • Glide the bottom portion of a metal clothes hanger across your clothes, this removes the static immediately.
  • Toss a damp wash cloth into the dryer for the last 10 to 20 minutes of the drying cycle to prevent the air inside the dryer from becoming too dry, which creates more static.
  • Static electricity brings an added dimension to a "bad hair day," however, solutions do exist. Use a rich conditioner to add moisture and reduce the amount of static that clings to your hair.
  • When brushing your hair, lightly spray hairspray onto your comb to reduce the static currently in your hair.
Here is just some dumb info for ya.

Here is some dumb info for ya.

I did not start out with Dear Gibson. Happy.

This post has been edited by FZ Fan: 11 January 2018 - 07:01 AM

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#6 User is offline   NighthawkChris 

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 08:28 AM

View PostFZ Fan, on 11 January 2018 - 07:01 AM, said:

Dear Readers of this Page:

The dry air and cold weather during winter months cause an increase in static electricity in your home, causing your clothes to stick and your hair to stand on end. What is static electricity all about and why is it worse in the winter?

Why it's worse in winter

Normally in the summer, the humidity in the air helps dissipate these negative charges. During the winter months, there's less water in the air and charged objects are more likely to be dissipated by your touch. Here are some ways to minimize your encounters with static electricity in your daily routine:

Home remedies for static electricity

  • If you have a humidifier in your home, raise the humidity level. The water particles emitted from the humidifier will quickly break up the static charges throughout objects in your home. If you don't have a humidifier, you can boil water on your stove and add a spice like cinnamon or citrus to help reduce the static charges nearby. Indoor plants are another great way to bring moisture to your home.
  • Your carpet can act as a main conductor for static electricity. Socks or shoes rubbed across the carpet create large amounts of static electricity. Static Guard is a commercially sold product that fights against static on carpet, however, mixing one cap-full of fabric softener into a spray bottle full of water will produce the same effect. Shake the mixture and spray lightly on carpet for static protection.
  • Nothing can be more frustrating than static clinging to your clothes. One solution is using dryer sheets to minimize the amount of fabric contact during the drying process. If your clothes are already washed, rub dryer sheets on them to reduce the amount of static.
  • Glide the bottom portion of a metal clothes hanger across your clothes, this removes the static immediately.
  • Toss a damp wash cloth into the dryer for the last 10 to 20 minutes of the drying cycle to prevent the air inside the dryer from becoming too dry, which creates more static.
  • Static electricity brings an added dimension to a "bad hair day," however, solutions do exist. Use a rich conditioner to add moisture and reduce the amount of static that clings to your hair.
  • When brushing your hair, lightly spray hairspray onto your comb to reduce the static currently in your hair.
Here is just some dumb info for ya.

Here is some dumb info for ya.

I did not start out with Dear Gibson. Happy.


First off, if you complain about something getting statically charged such as a Gibson guitar, then this will not make sense to them. Good explanation, I learned something. Thanks for clearing up the mystery why I see little blue arcs jumping form my body when I feel that POP as we call it. I thought I was magic???
Typos courtesy of iPhone

...I just tell my wife I have been gifted with great taste in guitars
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#7 User is offline   kidblast 

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 08:41 AM

we all deal with this -- keep a few dryer anti static sheet that have gone thru one cycle, and rub that where you're getting static,, this helps a little. but nothing will remove it unitl the RH reaches a more comfortable level. very dry here in the North East..
/Ray
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#8 User is offline   FZ Fan 

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 09:00 AM

View PostNighthawkChris, on 11 January 2018 - 08:28 AM, said:

First off, if you complain about something getting statically charged such as a Gibson guitar, then this will not make sense to them. Good explanation, I learned something. Thanks for clearing up the mystery why I see little blue arcs jumping form my body when I feel that POP as we call it. I thought I was magic???


I am an electrician by trade and that is all that electricity is, just magic. Or PFM (Pure F-ing Magic).That POP as you say is called getting shocked. Many people say electrocuted, but that is getting shocked to death.

I hear dryer sheets work.

This post has been edited by FZ Fan: 11 January 2018 - 09:02 AM

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#9 User is offline   saturn 

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 11:00 AM

I used to get a similar thing with my Studio, when I played it in my basement in winter. I think it was from the plastic piece on the back covering the pots. It would rub against my shirt and build up a charge and whenever I moved a certain way, there would be a creaking type sound. Like a door that needed it's hinges oiled.
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#10 User is offline   merciful-evans 

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 01:40 PM

Hopefully some of this advice will help.

Meanwhile dont play any NYE gigs. 30 balloons sticking to your guitar is embarrassing.
I sometimes think; therefore I am intermittent
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my band BLOWN OUT
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#11 User is offline   MichaelT 

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 03:48 PM

Before winter when it was hot and humid outside and cool inside, no issues with static. Now, during winter, with cold dry air outside and warm dry air inside, static. Happens on both my Standard with the nitro finish and Tribute with satin finish. Humidifiers really help.
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#12 User is offline   kidblast 

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 03:49 PM

View Postmerciful-evans, on 11 January 2018 - 01:40 PM, said:

Hopefully some of this advice will help.

Meanwhile dont play any NYE gigs. 30 balloons sticking to your guitar is embarrassing.



nah the visual alone is compelling...
/Ray
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#13 User is offline   FZ Fan 

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 04:19 PM

View Postmerciful-evans, on 11 January 2018 - 01:40 PM, said:

Hopefully some of this advice will help.

Meanwhile dont play any NYE gigs. 30 balloons sticking to your guitar is embarrassing.


If it was Halloween it would be a good costume.
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#14 User is offline   mkj 

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 06:26 AM

I've had that problem with 3 new Gibsons. It went away after about a year. My personal opinion is it is a combination of the finish, the home environment, the weather and my electric personality. Cleaning the guitar also seems to help temporarily.
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#15 User is offline   FZ Fan 

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 07:03 AM

Don't we live in a time that is so far ahead of what anyone would have imagined technologically and guys with fancy college degrees can't invent a guitar finish that repels static. I walk around with a phone in my hand that has more power and has more memory than the computer we used to send men to the moon (if you believe that load of BS).
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#16 User is offline   merciful-evans 

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 11:46 AM

View PostFZ Fan, on 13 January 2018 - 07:03 AM, said:

Don't we live in a time that is so far ahead of what anyone would have imagined technologically and guys with fancy college degrees can't invent a guitar finish that repels static.



What? This feller?

Posted Image

How many around here would buy it?
I sometimes think; therefore I am intermittent
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my band BLOWN OUT
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#17 User is offline   shupe13 

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 08:28 AM

My new LP was horrible for about a week. Non issue now. I’ve never had a static issue before.
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#18 User is offline   KevinM 

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Posted 15 January 2018 - 06:03 PM

Hmmm...You aren't wearing polyester are you? Deadly in dry environments. Humidity is your issue. Get your relative humidity up to at least 30%
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#19 User is offline   flyingarmadillo 

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 04:17 PM

View PostKevinM, on 15 January 2018 - 06:03 PM, said:

Hmmm...You aren't wearing polyester are you? Deadly in dry environments. Humidity is your issue. Get your relative humidity up to at least 30%


And cotton shirts and pants.
2007 Gibson SG '61 Reissue (Classic White), 2006 Gibson Les Paul Vintage Mahogany, 2007 Gibson SG Faded Bass,

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2000 Alvarez AD60S, 2001 Alvarez AD60S12, 2011 Yairi FYM – 95, 2011 Yairi WY-1TS, 2012 Yairi CYM-95, 2009 Alvarez MSD-1,


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#20 User is offline   Black Dog 

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 04:33 PM

Whether or not you have static problems is probably slightly complicated. I live in Oregon. It's warm and VERY dry in the summer, it's cold and VERY wet here in the winter. Spring and fall are a mix. I've never had any static problems on my guitars, or anything else.
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