Gibson Brands Forums: Best Refurb Find - Gibson Brands Forums

Jump to content

  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Best Refurb Find What's the best find you were able to refurbish back to life?

#21 User is offline   rustystrings 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 155
  • Joined: 10-January 08
  • LocationGreenwood SC

Posted 16 May 2018 - 03:21 PM

No pix, but -

- c.1950 J-45 that I acquired for free - I bought a battered P-Bass for $75 and traded it for the J-45 and $75. Someone had spent a bunch of money having it professionally refinished and then the poor thing must have gotten hot, because the neck block popped off the bass side, resulting in 24-count-'em-24 cracks in the top and back. It spent more than a year at Bob McIsaac's shop in Atlanta (and I suspect it was his apprentice who did the work), but when I got it back $500 later (this was in 1995), that guitar changed how I hear guitars. No idea about collector value, because I gave it to my brother, but it was money well spent.

- c.1943 (?) Gibson L-7. Stripped of all hardware and frets and finish, f-hole cracks, and I probably paid too much for it at $250 c.1995 or so. I had Dave Hosler (when he had his shop in Traveler's Rest, SC, before he worked for Taylor and designed stuff for them, before he retired and went to work at SevenC Music in St. Petersburg FL) and he refretted it, gave it a gentle tobacco sunburst and reassembled it all for me. Not too much money and a nice enough guitar.

- c.1931-ish Gibson L-4 roundhole. No frets, some hardware, big honking hole where someone had mounted a DeArmond soundhole pickup near the bridge, volume and tone pot holes, gaping hole in the side where the added output jack had taken lots of lumber with it. The back had a huge area scraped clean to reveal AMAZING tiger-striped maple. $175. Again, Dave Hosler did his magic - inletted a patch on the top, patched the control holes, patched the side, installed some Grover Sta-Tites, refretted it - and his comment when I got it back was, "This one actually sounds really good - most of these don't, but this one has something." And it did, there was a low end unlike any other archtop I have ever experienced, a whomp that had to be heard. It was a most unforgiving guitar when you made a mistake, because you surely heard it. One of the very few guitars I sold that I still miss sometimes.

- 1970s Guild 212 - another basket case, gaping holes in the side, needed a bunch of work, and again, Dave Hosler made it whole again. We did nothing more than seal up the patches, though. It was my second 12-string, became the second 12-string I sold to a friend and became the second 12-string I sold to a friend who had it stolen in a break-in. So don't buy 12-strings from me, there's some weirdness in the universe about that ...

There was no real money made in any of these cases, but I got to play guitars I could never have afforded had they been nice and clean and undamaged. Also, and this is weird and subjective, but every funky old guitar I have brought back from the dead has been an AWESOME guitar. They're like abused shelter dogs, they're just so damned grateful and happy to be whole and playable and played again. It's a little unsettling ...
2005 Gibson J-45 Historic Collection
2012 Kremona Fiesta FS
2010? Seagull S6 Original
1950? Favilla U2 soprano
0

#22 User is offline   billroy 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 681
  • Joined: 30-November 17

Posted 17 May 2018 - 11:31 AM

View Postrustystrings, on 16 May 2018 - 03:21 PM, said:

No pix, but -

- c.1950 J-45 that I acquired for free - I bought a battered P-Bass for $75 and traded it for the J-45 and $75. Someone had spent a bunch of money having it professionally refinished and then the poor thing must have gotten hot, because the neck block popped off the bass side, resulting in 24-count-'em-24 cracks in the top and back. It spent more than a year at Bob McIsaac's shop in Atlanta (and I suspect it was his apprentice who did the work), but when I got it back $500 later (this was in 1995), that guitar changed how I hear guitars. No idea about collector value, because I gave it to my brother, but it was money well spent.

- c.1943 (?) Gibson L-7. Stripped of all hardware and frets and finish, f-hole cracks, and I probably paid too much for it at $250 c.1995 or so. I had Dave Hosler (when he had his shop in Traveler's Rest, SC, before he worked for Taylor and designed stuff for them, before he retired and went to work at SevenC Music in St. Petersburg FL) and he refretted it, gave it a gentle tobacco sunburst and reassembled it all for me. Not too much money and a nice enough guitar.

- c.1931-ish Gibson L-4 roundhole. No frets, some hardware, big honking hole where someone had mounted a DeArmond soundhole pickup near the bridge, volume and tone pot holes, gaping hole in the side where the added output jack had taken lots of lumber with it. The back had a huge area scraped clean to reveal AMAZING tiger-striped maple. $175. Again, Dave Hosler did his magic - inletted a patch on the top, patched the control holes, patched the side, installed some Grover Sta-Tites, refretted it - and his comment when I got it back was, "This one actually sounds really good - most of these don't, but this one has something." And it did, there was a low end unlike any other archtop I have ever experienced, a whomp that had to be heard. It was a most unforgiving guitar when you made a mistake, because you surely heard it. One of the very few guitars I sold that I still miss sometimes.

- 1970s Guild 212 - another basket case, gaping holes in the side, needed a bunch of work, and again, Dave Hosler made it whole again. We did nothing more than seal up the patches, though. It was my second 12-string, became the second 12-string I sold to a friend and became the second 12-string I sold to a friend who had it stolen in a break-in. So don't buy 12-strings from me, there's some weirdness in the universe about that ...

There was no real money made in any of these cases, but I got to play guitars I could never have afforded had they been nice and clean and undamaged. Also, and this is weird and subjective, but every funky old guitar I have brought back from the dead has been an AWESOME guitar. They're like abused shelter dogs, they're just so damned grateful and happy to be whole and playable and played again. It's a little unsettling ...


Wow, all great stories! (I gotta figure out where you hang out to have some of that pass me by!) My intent is to land with a player or two I wouldn't be able to afford otherwise. I want to play it, play it, play it, appreciate it... and then maybe show it to a few people :) Your stories give me hope!
'18 Gibson J45, vintage
'86 Guild D25
'00 Fender Strat (American Standard)
'90 Fender Strat (Korea, bought in an open market in Korea... yeah it might be real)
'68 Gibson SG
'17 Several 3 String CBGs

"Want people to listen to your stuff, don't play boring stuff..." heard somewhere.
0

#23 User is offline   tpbiii 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 1282
  • Joined: 19-January 09

Posted 17 May 2018 - 04:42 PM

This was found totally disassembled and refinished with a mop -- thick and gooey. I hate to do it, but total restoration required. 1931 L-2
Posted Image
Posted Image

https://vimeo.com/269778651

Sunbursted with a spray can. 1933 0-18.
Posted Image

Posted Image

Let's pick,
-Tom

This post has been edited by tpbiii: 17 May 2018 - 04:44 PM

Never criticize a musician until you have walked a mile in his shoes. Then you will be a mile away and you will have his shoes.
0

#24 User is offline   drathbun 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 2443
  • Joined: 02-August 08
  • LocationCalgary, Alberta

Posted 18 May 2018 - 12:07 AM

My favourite reno isn't a terribly expensive guitar but it has sentimental value. My first "real" acoustic guitar was a 1970 Yamaha FG-140 Red Label (actually made in Japan "Nippon Gakki"). I got it, brand new, for my 14th birthday from my parents. I sold it to pay for a brand new 1977 Gibson Hummingbird which turned out to be a horrible mistake. I always regretted selling that Yamaha and years later started looking for one on eBay and quickly discovered the "Red Labels" are highly sought-after. I found a totally beat up 1968 Yamaha FG-150 in Vancouver and picked it up for a song while I was there on business.

The guitar looked like it had been dragged around the planet on someone's back and had been played so much, some of the layers of the plywood top are showing through on the soundhole. My wife dubbed it "The Hippie Guitar". It was in serious need of a neck reset. I reset the neck, refretted it, reshaped and refinished the neck, replaced the tuners with Grover Sta-tites and made a new nut and new saddle from bone blanks, replaced all the fret markers with abalone and replaced the plastic pins with rosewood with abalone inlays. It is a total campfire, knockabout guitar but plays and sounds great. I keep it in Nashville tuning at the moment with a Tahoe mag pickup.

Battle Scars:
Posted Image

Neck off, ready for reset:
Posted Image

Neck reshaped ready for pour filler, stain and nitro:
Posted Image

Refinished neck:
Posted Image

Neck reinstalled and fretboard levelling:
Posted Image

Refret:
Posted Image

Fret Levelling:
Posted Image

Clipping Ends:
Posted Image

New bone nut:
Posted Image

New Grover Sta-tite Tuners:
Posted Image
Beware of Doug

Posted Image

2018 Taylor GS Mini Walnut
2014 Godin Multiac Classical
2013 Martin 000-28vs 12 fret
2012 Gibson "The Golden Age 1930's" SJ200
2012 Squier Vintage Modified 70's Jazz Bass
2010 Gretsch Electromatic G5122DC
2009 Taylor GA3-12e
2004 Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster
1981 Rickenbacker 320JG
1968 Yamaha FG150 Red Label
My Soundclick Music Page

My YouTube Channel
0

#25 User is offline   Cabarone 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 130
  • Joined: 16-March 17

Posted 18 May 2018 - 12:21 AM

Quote



Sunbursted with a spray can. 1933 0-18.


That paint job literally made me cringe...ugh...gack, even...

This post has been edited by Cabarone: 18 May 2018 - 01:53 AM

'65 B 45 12 String
'90 Dove
'91 Guild F25 ce NT
'96 Martin SPD16T
'12 Taylor 455 12 String
Done for now
0

#26 User is offline   Dash_Starkiller 

  • Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 79
  • Joined: 21-March 17
  • LocationMarietta, GA

Posted 18 May 2018 - 06:01 AM

View Postdrathbun, on 18 May 2018 - 12:07 AM, said:

My favourite reno isn't a terribly expensive guitar but it has sentimental value. My first "real" acoustic guitar was a 1970 Yamaha FG-140 Red Label (actually made in Japan "Nippon Gakki"). I got it, brand new, for my 14th birthday from my parents. I sold it to pay for a brand new 1977 Gibson Hummingbird which turned out to be a horrible mistake. I always regretted selling that Yamaha and years later started looking for one on eBay and quickly discovered the "Red Labels" are highly sought-after. I found a totally beat up 1968 Yamaha FG-150 in Vancouver and picked it up for a song while I was there on business.

The guitar looked like it had been dragged around the planet on someone's back and had been played so much, some of the layers of the plywood top are showing through on the soundhole. My wife dubbed it "The Hippie Guitar". It was in serious need of a neck reset. I reset the neck, refretted it, reshaped and refinished the neck, replaced the tuners with Grover Sta-tites and made a new nut and new saddle from bone blanks, replaced all the fret markers with abalone and replaced the plastic pins with rosewood with abalone inlays. It is a total campfire, knockabout guitar but plays and sounds great. I keep it in Nashville tuning at the moment with a Tahoe mag pickup.

Battle Scars:
Posted Image

Neck off, ready for reset:
Posted Image

Neck reshaped ready for pour filler, stain and nitro:
Posted Image

Refinished neck:
Posted Image

Neck reinstalled and fretboard levelling:
Posted Image

Refret:
Posted Image

Fret Levelling:
Posted Image

Clipping Ends:
Posted Image

New bone nut:
Posted Image

New Grover Sta-tite Tuners:
Posted Image


That is GREAT work. It is said that FG neck resets are nearly impossible to reset because of the apparent epoxy used. But you obviously proved that wrong. I’m a huge fan of those guitars and think your work on that looks phenomenal.

This post has been edited by Dash_Starkiller: 18 May 2018 - 07:41 AM

2012 Gibson J45 "68" Ebony
1991 Gibson Southern Jumbo
1977 Ventura V 1588
Homebuilt Tele-monster
0

#27 User is offline   billroy 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 681
  • Joined: 30-November 17

Posted 18 May 2018 - 08:22 AM

View Postdrathbun, on 18 May 2018 - 12:07 AM, said:

My favourite reno isn't a terribly expensive guitar but it has sentimental value.

Clipping Ends:
Posted Image



Hi Doug - On this pic, what's up with the finish on the fretboard, it looks like someone had a little trouble putting a coat of poly on it or something? Is this something, or just the way the picture looks, and did you do anything about that?

ps - thanks for posting the pics, what a great process!
'18 Gibson J45, vintage
'86 Guild D25
'00 Fender Strat (American Standard)
'90 Fender Strat (Korea, bought in an open market in Korea... yeah it might be real)
'68 Gibson SG
'17 Several 3 String CBGs

"Want people to listen to your stuff, don't play boring stuff..." heard somewhere.
0

#28 User is offline   billroy 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 681
  • Joined: 30-November 17

Posted 18 May 2018 - 08:25 AM

View Posttpbiii, on 17 May 2018 - 04:42 PM, said:

Let's pick,
-Tom


tpbiii - i aspire, it's your stories that have me wondering if i can open my eyes a bit and maybe walk into a rehab opportunity!
'18 Gibson J45, vintage
'86 Guild D25
'00 Fender Strat (American Standard)
'90 Fender Strat (Korea, bought in an open market in Korea... yeah it might be real)
'68 Gibson SG
'17 Several 3 String CBGs

"Want people to listen to your stuff, don't play boring stuff..." heard somewhere.
0

#29 User is offline   j45nick 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 10445
  • Joined: 05-February 11
  • LocationSouth Florida

Posted 18 May 2018 - 10:16 AM

View Postbillroy, on 18 May 2018 - 08:25 AM, said:

tpbiii - i aspire, it's your stories that have me wondering if i can open my eyes a bit and maybe walk into a rehab opportunity!



Once you start walking into guitar rehab opportunities, the next step is your local rehab facility.

Rescuing guitar diamonds in the rough can easily become an addiction. Just ask the zombywoof.
0

#30 User is offline   drathbun 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 2443
  • Joined: 02-August 08
  • LocationCalgary, Alberta

Posted 18 May 2018 - 11:12 AM

View Postbillroy, on 18 May 2018 - 08:22 AM, said:

Hi Doug - On this pic, what's up with the finish on the fretboard, it looks like someone had a little trouble putting a coat of poly on it or something? Is this something, or just the way the picture looks, and did you do anything about that?

ps - thanks for posting the pics, what a great process!


That's wax to keep the superglue from seeping into the fretboard. :) Looks like a funky finish doesn't it?
Beware of Doug

Posted Image

2018 Taylor GS Mini Walnut
2014 Godin Multiac Classical
2013 Martin 000-28vs 12 fret
2012 Gibson "The Golden Age 1930's" SJ200
2012 Squier Vintage Modified 70's Jazz Bass
2010 Gretsch Electromatic G5122DC
2009 Taylor GA3-12e
2004 Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster
1981 Rickenbacker 320JG
1968 Yamaha FG150 Red Label
My Soundclick Music Page

My YouTube Channel
0

#31 User is offline   drathbun 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 2443
  • Joined: 02-August 08
  • LocationCalgary, Alberta

Posted 18 May 2018 - 11:23 AM

View PostDash_Starkiller, on 18 May 2018 - 06:01 AM, said:

That is GREAT work. It is said that FG neck resets are nearly impossible to reset because of the apparent epoxy used. But you obviously proved that wrong. Iím a huge fan of those guitars and think your work on that looks phenomenal.


Thanks, Dash.

Getting that neck out was quite a challenge. I had to apply so much pressure on the neck clamp that it crushed the heel cap. I carved a new one out of rosewood. Also, some of the dovetail was destroyed in the process as well. I had to reshape the dovetail wood and then do some serious shimming.

Squished heel cap and removed damaged parts of dove tail:
Posted Image

Dove tail repair:
Posted Image

Shims:
Posted Image

New heel cap:
Posted Image
Beware of Doug

Posted Image

2018 Taylor GS Mini Walnut
2014 Godin Multiac Classical
2013 Martin 000-28vs 12 fret
2012 Gibson "The Golden Age 1930's" SJ200
2012 Squier Vintage Modified 70's Jazz Bass
2010 Gretsch Electromatic G5122DC
2009 Taylor GA3-12e
2004 Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster
1981 Rickenbacker 320JG
1968 Yamaha FG150 Red Label
My Soundclick Music Page

My YouTube Channel
0

Share this topic:


  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users