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Unreal playing.


LarryUK

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I've read that it's not the fastest. But it's on a nylon string. Not a fast neck electric. [scared]

Yeah, but it's on a fast neck nylon.

 

And he couldn't play that on a steel-strung guitar.

Firstly the strings would get red-hot, burning his fingers and, secondly, as the strings heated up to 'red-hot' they would go out of pitch according to the fundamental law of General Volumetric Thermal Expansion;

 

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"...and I bet he can't play Slowly, With Feeling...".....................................:^o

 

 

 

 

Seriously though.

 

Blinking Heck! Very Impressive Precision!

 

Thanks for posting. It's ruined my day...lol!

 

P.

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Guest Farnsbarns

I'd be lying if I said I listened to any of those notes.

 

rct

 

Good greif man. Comments like that need a warning. I laughed so violently I've ruptured my spleen.

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Smoke and mirrors.

 

I don't believe anything I can't see.

 

Is this a Guinness record? How do they confirm it?

 

Let's see it on a high speed photron camera at 12,500 fps.

 

1300 bpm is a beat every 4/100's(0.0461538461538462) of a second. (21.6 beats per second)

A camera shooting 12,500 frames per second would easily capture this note for note.

 

 

Not only that,, played perfectly every time in one take?

I seriously doubt it.

 

ridiculous shredding yes,, note for note at 1300 bpm? I doubt it.

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One good thing from this thread...

 

It made me look back and listen again to such as Segovia playing Chaconne... John Williams playing Asturias... Asya Selyutina playing Tarantella...

 

There's roughly equivalent speed in spurts where called for - just with a different technique. Yet because it's not called shredding and is done with thumb and three fingers...

 

Here's Williams doing the Bach Chaconne... There are several places where different fingerboard patterns are played at least with as many single string "notes" but yet musically. If you're a rocker/shredder, still give it a listen for some of those single string bits and consider that actually there's room to watch the left hand speed of a classical guitarist as well as that of the flatpicker.

 

Note also how relaxed his hands... that allows the speed that sounds and looks effortless.

 

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Yes, the thing that has always amazed me about classical players "shredding" for lack of a better way to put it is how relaxed they seem.

 

Even the smoothest metal shredder seems very deliberate in the fingering, but classical players seem fluid.

 

I have a great cd of Pagannini songs on disk that amazes me everytime I listen to it......lots of skill in classical for certain!

 

NHTom

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Tom...

 

I may be wrong, but I think it has to do with bare hand fingerpickin' with the right hand as much as anything. At a certain point you really don't think about where the thumb and fingers go, and they basically remain relaxed.

 

With a flatpick, whether guitar or mandolin or whatever, there's a constant pressure within the hand that can't relax without dropping the pick. So...

 

Just a thought on that though. I do know I'm more comfortable bare hand fingerpicking than flatpicking, although I've done both.

 

m

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