Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

OBAMA


Mr. Robot

Recommended Posts

Hi Everyone. I have noticed as a relative newcomer to this site, that quite a lot of you fine folk are a bit sceptical of your new President, Barack Obama.

 

A healthy scepticism is a good thing. And while I am not going to comment on whether his politics are right or wrong, I thought you might be interested to hear my perspective as a person living in Australia - a country which is a great friend of the US. I hope this does not come over as patronising. It is certainly not intended as such.

 

BUT - I have been thinking about this a lot - so here goes...............and I hope this doesnt cause as much angst as a few of the other touchy subjects that have been raised here :-

 

While it is early days, it is my observation that the election of Obama has had a huge positive impact on Australians in terms of attitudes towards the US . In short, I think there is now a lot more good-will towards the US in my country than there was 6 months ago.

 

You may not think this is important if you live in a superpower like the US, but in international relations it is. Because the US is such a large power, reputation is actually very important, particularly for the people who live in the countries of its allies.

 

If people overseas lose respect for an administration, they become more likely to believe what other countries and regimes might be saying and this in turn affects their policies, decision-making and national security.

 

For those in my country who had 'gone off' the US under Bush, the election of Obama has restored their faith in the US. His election has reinforced the international image of the US as a country of opportunity, hope, democracy, peace and freedom.

 

So - the next time you are sitting at home and possibly getting frustrated and angry about an Obama domestic decision that you disagree with - take a deep breath and try to give this perspective some thought.

 

As they say, no matter how big and tough you are, everyone needs their friends and so far, Obama is making a big difference.

 

Regards,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 54
  • Created
  • Last Reply
...the election of Obama has restored their faith in the US. His election has reinforced the international image of the US as a country of opportunity' date=' hope, democracy, peace and freedom.[/quote']

 

I think it's pretty obvious that the popular sentiment of other countries towards Obama and the ultimately the United States is a good thing. However, Obama is still in the honeymoon stages of his administration, and there is a growing resentment towards the bigger government policies he advocates.

 

I know he is a man with convictions and carefully contemplates his decisions. He seeks out scholarly advice when he needs to and is willing to listen to other perspectives, ideologies and views.

 

Hopefully, in his willingness to lead America, he will be sensitive to the needs of the our great country.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Americans don't really care what Australians think. Australians know nothing about America. Americans know nothing about Australia. We have our own identities and interests. Just going someplace for a few weeks as a tourist means nothing, and imparts no real insight into the condition of any country.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm with droge1, if you like Obama take him...

 

What did Australia think of Reagan? The Western Europeans hated him, but the Eastern Europeans loved him...

What did Australia think of Clinton? Remember, he bombed Serbia against the express wishes of the UN...

What did Australia think of H.W. Bush and Jimmy Carter?

 

In the end, as an American, I'd rather be strong and powerful enough to defend our interests in spite of what the masses in other countries think about our policy. Countries work together based on common needs and interests, not on whether they necessarily like the gov't.

 

My .02

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your kind words. I think some of my fellow US members forget that we live in a global economy. I think it is important for the future of the US economy that we are seen as member of the global community rather than an increasingly isolated state with a myopic view of the rest of the world.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Growing resentment" is an understatement. The trend is that even liberal papers, like the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, are taking a blunt conservative stance in reporting on Obama, and highly regarded financial publications are positively, justifiably, and uncharacteristically frank in their negativity toward Obama. For example, The Economist described the Obama administration as having a growing pattern of incompetence, and a Bloomberg commentator describes him as a "Manchurian candidate". One successful manager of a $15 billion fund said obliquely that the people in Washington "know less than a goat". It was not clear whether he intended this to mean collectively or individually. This is unusual talk from people who are usually taciturn in such matters.

 

Vladimir Putin has advised Americans to learn from the Russian experience and not allow politicians to have too much control of the economy. It is now generally recognized within financial circles that Obama owns the current recession, and that he can no longer plausibly claim that he inherited the problem. Then there is the massive mishandling of non-targeted funds that were originally conceived to instill confidence in lenders, but in fact are having the opposite effect. Monetary specialists are up in arms because the money supply today in the US is nearly three times what it was last year at this time, and yet the government continues to print money, with the inevitable consequence of high inflation within a year or two. The American consumer, like American business, is paralyzed and refusing to spend. Why? Because of the uncertainty and sense of crisis fomented by Barrack Obama. It is amazing how much damage he has done in such a short time.

 

Obama's presidency is a national tragedy alread, but by golly, let's just set that aside because, after all, the Australians think he's such a fine fellow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let's not forget the Nixon/Ford/Carter years of high inflation, price and wage controls, and the resulting era that gave us 1970's CBS Fenders (gasp!) and which were some of the darkest days for Gibson. If you're in the guitar business, here's how it works: first the low-end customers stop buying, then the high-end customers stop buying.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

You are correct' date=' but it was not approved of ny the UN, even though Clinton tried for thier approval. Who pays the lions share of NATO's funding?[/quote']

 

I am surprised that you would care if an American president received approval from the UN to bomb the crap out another country.

 

Also,

 

In the end' date=' as an American, I'd rather be strong and powerful enough to defend our interests in spite of what the masses in other countries think about our policy. [/quote']

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I don't give a crap about the UN, but so much of the rest of the world and the libs in the US said that Bush acted like a cowboy when he invaded Iraq. The truth is much different, he had the approval of the congress, the UN and the majority of the American people. Clinton acted like a cowboy when he went to war against Serbia and nobody called him on it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm with droge1' date=' if you like Obama take him...

 

What did Australia think of Reagan? The Western Europeans hated him, but the Eastern Europeans loved him...

What did Australia think of Clinton? Remember, he bombed Serbia against the express wishes of the UN...

What did Australia think of H.W. Bush and Jimmy Carter?

 

In the end, as an American, I'd rather be strong and powerful enough to defend our interests in spite of what the masses in other countries think about our policy. Countries work together based on common needs and interests, not on whether they necessarily like the gov't.

 

My .02[/quote']

 

I am not sure what you were expecting me to say to this, but I think in general that most US Presidents have been respected in Australia. Australian media and education institutions report widely on international events and politics on a daily basis and they certainly do not report on US politics in a partisan way. International affairs from all over the world are often a headline item in our news. I think Bush senior was well regarded. Reagan started out as a bit of a curiosity, but I think he won a lot of people over along the way. Clinton was also well regarded.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...For those in my country who had 'gone off' the US under Bush' date=' the election of Obama has restored their faith in the US. His election has reinforced the international image of the US as a country of opportunity, hope, democracy, peace and freedom...[/quote']

 

I wasn't asking about what Australians thought about Carter, Reagan, Bush 1, and Clinton, to be argumentative. I was curious because of your statement regarding Obama's election reinforcing our international image as a country of opportunity, etc...

 

I was wondering why Australia thought "less" of America while Bush was in office, and what the difference was with Bush vs. the other American presidents.

 

I was in Australia (Sydney) for almost 6 months in 1989. My company sent me there to work as an expatriate. While I was there, I was never in a political conversation, nobody ever asked me anything about American politics or foreign policy. I was planning on making a home there in your country, until my company made other plans and moved their APAC office to Hong Kong. The Australians that I met were some of the friendliest people that I have ever met, and they seemed to have a genuine affection for Americans. I enjoyed my stay in Australia more than in any other country I have visited and I felt more at home there than anywhere else I've ever been.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mr. Robot,

Let me take this chance to apologize if my fellow American forum mates come across as a bit prickly.

I can assure you that the sentiments expressed are not aimed at you per se, but a greater entity.

 

I commend your courage to state what you did.

I believe it to be honest, heartfelt, and somewhat representative of your country as a whole.

 

That being said, I cannot possibly convey to you the horror, anger, and outright fear I feel now with the idiots we have in the Democratic Party. Congress and the Senate are a Roman Orgy of taxpayer funded indulgence, and they are praising and worshipping Obama as if he's the New Messiah.

 

Making over $100,000 a year and paying more than half of it in taxes, combined with the new 'stimulus' bailout packages they have created - adding up to another $175,000 in tax dollars for everyone in my tax bracket - not cool.

At some point, we will be forced to pay for this!

 

The United States is facing something very profound, nothing like this has ever faced our nation before.

We've stood strong in the face of various challenges, now I fear that strength is more than diminished - it's forgotten.

 

I've always wanted to visit Australia, I know many people who have.

During the Clinton years (1993-2001) I seriously considered moving there to work, as I met one of your countrymen in Texas and got to know him. Clinton was a slimeball, concerned with himself alone, and destroyed us on the world stage.

With dreams of wide-open spaces beckoning, and personal freedom to live as I pleased on even a meager income, he brought me around to reality pretty quickly.

 

The Port Arthur shooting in 1996 and the immediate gun seizure was a fatal blow to my equator-hopping aspirations.

With such wide open remote areas, animals of every shape and flavor to kill you, and then no means of defending myself was the deciding factor.

My Aussie acquaintance told me to go ahead Down Under and take his place because he wasn't going back.

 

Shortly after that, I was at a gun show and met a gun dealer from Australia who was almost tearful in his pleas to not let us do that sort of sh!t here and fight our government at every turn where freedom and personal liberty are concerned.

 

I'm sorry.

The United States is THE LAST PLACE ON EARTH where our unique ideals and freedom are available - if not practiced.

I'm gonna stay here and fight, I will NOT be traveling abroad anymore - not even Mexico.

I'll take the derision of the rest of the world in stride, and do what I can to right the Good Ship USA.

 

Thank you for your well-meaning input, sorry if you feel we should agree more.

63 million Americans voted for Obama, and many of them are realizing 50 days in what a hangover we're in for.

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I wasn't asking about what Australians thought about Carter' date=' Reagan, Bush 1, and Clinton, to be argumentative. I was curious because of your statement regarding Obama's election reinforcing our international image as a country of opportunity, etc...

 

I was wondering why Australia thought "less" of America while Bush was in office, and what the difference was with Bush vs. the other American presidents.

 

I was in Australia (Sydney) for almost 6 months in 1989. My company sent me there to work as an expatriate. While I was there, I was never in a political conversation, nobody ever asked me anything about American politics or foreign policy. I was planning on making a home there in your country, until my company made other plans and moved their APAC office to Hong Kong. The Australians that I met were some of the friendliest people that I have ever met, and they seemed to have a genuine affection for Americans. I enjoyed my stay in Australia more than in any other country I have visited and I felt more at home there than anywhere else I've ever been. [/quote']

 

 

Ah KSG it is all good!!!. And I remember your story about being in Oz. The fact of the matter is that we tend not to discuss domestic politics as openly in Australia as you guys do - there is more of the British reserve in Australians than you might think - so politics and religion tend to be taboo topics in the office unless it relates to the job. So you gotta tease it out of them.

 

In terms of your question, it certainly appears that Australians' perception of and trust of the US Administration went backwards under George W - this has NOTHING to do with what party GW represents. Maybe it was the way our media portrayed him, but it was not helped by the WMD fiasco and our own Prime Minister cow towing and agreeing with everything GW did and said.

 

I understand that some people dont care if this was the case. I disagree - and I think we need to care what goes on all around the world. We are not insulated and we are affected by what others do in other parts of the world.

 

Personally, I love your country and I made it my major study in my degree. I was just commenting on perceptions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mr. Robot' date='

Let me take this chance to apologize if my fellow American forum mates come across as a bit prickly.

I can assure you that the sentiments expressed are not aimed at you per se, but a greater entity.

 

I commend your courage to state what you did.

I believe it to be honest, heartfelt, and somewhat representative of your country as a whole.

 

That being said, I cannot possibly convey to you the horror, anger, and outright fear I feel now with the idiots we have in the Democratic Party. Congress and the Senate are a Roman Orgy of taxpayer funded indulgence, and they are praising and worshipping Obama as if he's the New Messiah.

 

Making over $100,000 a year and paying more than half of it in taxes, combined with the new 'stimulus' bailout packages they have created - adding up to another $175,000 in tax dollars for everyone in my tax bracket - not cool.

At some point, we will be forced to pay for this!

 

The United States is facing something very profound, nothing like this has ever faced our nation before.

We've stood strong in the face of various challenges, now I fear that strength is more than diminished - it's forgotten.

 

I've always wanted to visit Australia, I know many people who have.

During the Clinton years (1993-2001) I seriously considered moving there to work, as I met one of your countrymen in Texas and got to know him. Clinton was a slimeball, concerned with himself alone, and destroyed us on the world stage.

With dreams of wide-open spaces beckoning, and personal freedom to live as I pleased on even a meager income, he brought me around to reality pretty quickly.

 

The Port Arthur shooting in 1996 and the immediate gun seizure was a fatal blow to my equator-hopping aspirations.

With such wide open remote areas, animals of every shape and flavor to kill you, and then no means of defending myself was the deciding factor.

My Aussie acquaintance told me to go ahead Down Under and take his place because he wasn't going back.

 

Shortly after that, I was at a gun show and met a gun dealer from Australia who was almost tearful in his pleas to not let us do that sort of sh!t here and fight our government at every turn where freedom and personal liberty are concerned.

 

I'm sorry.

The United States is THE LAST PLACE ON EARTH where our unique ideals and freedom are available - if not practiced.

I'm gonna stay here and fight, I will NOT be traveling abroad anymore - not even Mexico.

I'll take the derision of the rest of the world in stride, and do what I can to right the Good Ship USA.

 

Thank you for your well-meaning input, sorry if you feel we should agree more.

63 million Americans voted for Obama, and many of them are realizing 50 days in what a hangover we're in for.

 

Dave[/quote']

 

Hey Dave. No need to apologise, but I do appreciate your kind words and I do appreciate there are different opinions out there regarding Obama.

 

I've studied US Politics and History for years - I love it - and subscribe to your cable news channels, as well as news channels in other countries. So I do get a feel for American culture.

 

I dont expect people to agree with me either - my only plea to you guys is not to fall into the trap of not caring about the rest of the world and your country's place in it. There are lots of great civilisations and empires in history that thought they didnt need friends and allies - and they were wrong. Otherwise, why aren't they still here today?

 

Cheers, Andrew

 

I don't pretend to be an expert or be able to place myself in your shoes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This forum is not a microcosm of the United States. President Obama is well respected by the majority of Americans' date=' who overwhelmingly voted for him. [/quote']

 

Exactly. We have a few conservatives that have found their voice after 8 years of silence. They are just excited to try out their voices and brush under the carpet the huge failings of Bush and the horrible condition he left this country. They have a lot of anger, which is understandable. I would be angry if the person I had elected for the past eight years left my party in shambles, the economy on life support, and the Middle East in chaos.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This forum is not a microcosm of the United States. President Obama is well respected by the majority of Americans' date=' who overwhelmingly voted for him. [/quote']

 

Exactly. We have a few conservatives that have found their voice after 8 years of silence. They are just excited to try out their voices and brush under the carpet the huge failings of Bush and the horrible condition he left this country. They have a lot of anger, which is understandable. I would be angry if the person I had elected for the past eight years left my party in shambles, the economy on life support, and the Middle East in chaos.

 

I could find a bunch of Wikipedia entries to back up my statement and post them here in tedium...but who has the time for that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your input. So if your countrymen like him so much please take him. I'd rather be isolated than to have him as president. So he's all yours... go ahead take him.

 

 

LOL!

 

I also want to say welcome and I appreciate your input. While I hope that America would still be seen as that "shining city on the hill" I know it isn't. It isn't even though we spend BILLIONS helping less fortunate countries and peoples. It isn't even though we have lent our militart strength to liberate and protect million upon millions during our history. It isn't even though we are the only country to ever take a country in a war (WWII for example) and give it back to its people and play a part in its success as a democracy (think Germany and Japan, not to mention Iraq and Afghanistan).

 

People are going to hate us no matter what we do. Electing a man who wants to make us less of what I just mentioned and more of the borderless, identityless "nations" Europe has become is not the way to run our country. Why be less when we can be so much more. We need to be that shining city on the hill.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...