Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums
Sign in to follow this  
Gilliangirl

Do chords go in and out of favor with you?

Recommended Posts

Does anyone else find this phenomenon is part of their playtime? I usually have a few different chords that are *favorites* at any given time and even if I don't incorporate them into songs, I will make up little melodies around them. They're usually based on a pure love of their sound. For example, I can't get enough of this one at the moment, it's so unbelievably melancholy: 200230

Don't have a clue what it's called but it's basically a Dsus2 with an F# bass

My guitar is tuned down a half step atm and this sounds so sweet and sad at the same time.

 

And another favourite that I've even written a little song with: 799800

I must admit I stole that one from someone [biggrin]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very much so! Some of my fav's at the moment:

 

"open" barres"

577600

799800

 

and this all time fav:

 

332000

 

which is in a beautiful chord sequence in Pink Floyd's "Breathe".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Karen,

 

Your chord (200230) is a sort of D9 too, the 1st string E being the nine. That formation was used a lot in sixties folk music with its 7 counterpart D7/9 (200210) in songs in the key of C like Peter Paul and Mary's version of "Don't Think Twice (It's All Right)" and Arlo Guthrie's "Alice's Restaurant", and you're right; it is a very distinctive chord with a formation that lends itself nicely to finger-picking styles, especially when used as a transition (passing) chord with its F# bass note on the sixth string. I agree, it is a beautiful chord indeed.

 

Keep up the good work,

Jack6849

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
.....I will make up little melodies around them.

 

(Ah......so you do sing!)

 

My style of play tends to favor the key of E, which comes with an assortment of chords to be mangled, rather wrangled in various orders in support of a melody. I remember preferring minor keys early in my playing days but now it's the other way round. If I had to pick a favorite right now it'd be a plain ol' open C, including the bass G note.....wonderful sounding strum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great topic!

 

Let's start:

 

032000 / 002020 / 002200 / 00440x / 006600 / 009900 / 00121200

 

006700 / 008670 / 007570 / 00645x / 00423x / 00890x

 

06500x / 08700x / 0109000 /

 

05053x / 07075x /

 

404220 / 909700 /

 

53500x / 75700x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Your chord (200230) is a sort of D9 too, the 1st string E being the nine. That formation was used a lot in sixties folk music
. Your hear it in blues as well. Blind Lemon (Matchbox) and Mance Lipscomb (Oh Captain) go to that in "A" blues. Interesting variation: 004210 with a drop D inn the bass. Mance used that in Going Down Slow.

 

Btw good way to compose, that, working w/sounds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone else find this phenomenon is part of their playtime? I usually have a few different chords that are *favorites* at any given time and even if I don't incorporate them into songs, I will make up little melodies around them. They're usually based on a pure love of their sound. For example, I can't get enough of this one at the moment, it's so unbelievably melancholy: 200230

Don't have a clue what it's called but it's basically a Dsus2 with an F# bass

My guitar is tuned down a half step atm and this sounds so sweet and sad at the same time.

 

And another favourite that I've even written a little song with: 799800

I must admit I stole that one from someone [biggrin]

 

That D9 is my all time favourite too. Pete Townshend uses it sometimes e.g. chorus on I'm One.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, I wouldn't say chords go in and out of favor. Rather, when learning a new song or working up a new arrangement, I come across combinations that I really like - which sometimes leads me to other songs/arrangements with similar combinations. As others have pointed out, these chords usually feature a minimal alternate fingering, an "open" fingering, or a progression that features one or two drone strings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, ya'll! Listen, I learned to play guitar by ear 45 years ago. Those numbers ya'll are throwing out there don't mean squat to me! I know I'm not the sharpest knife in the drawer, so would one of you guys explain to me how those numbers can be a chord?!!! I'm not to old to learn! (yes, I'm humbling myself to ask, 'cause I don't know! I'm really not as ignorant as I sound!!!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only know 4 chords, so they're kind of favourites by default! I do change the order from time to time though.... [blush]

Matt

 

Matt.....why 4 chords? Basically you only need 3 right???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I only know 4 chords, so they're kind of favourites by default! [blush] Matt

 

Be bold, Matt. Go for five! (actually, get down the C A G E and D shapes and you have the goods to span neck. Move a shape up a fret & you are voicing it a new key)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gotta love those barred chords in the Gm7 format 353333 and that Bm7 335343 format. Move them up the neck and play them anywhere. My alltime favorite open chord is CM7 332000, followed by this G.... 320033

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

larryp58:

 

I've been playing for 46 years (...and counting.) and I was right there with you, not a few months ago so I'm glad to jump in here.

 

Any chord can be described by six numbers. Each digit in the string corresponds to a string on the guitar: from left to right, it's your low E string down to the high E string.

 

If a digit is a "0," it's open; if a digit is (for example), a "2," it means you press that string on the second fret. (Note that this method does not tell you WHICH finger to use..that's easy enough to figure out.) If you see an "x" instead of a digit, don't play that string at all.

 

So, a D chord in standard tuning looks like this: 000232.

 

I've always hated chord charts (I'm not very visual, I guess), I don't read music, and names like "Dsus2" never helped much.

 

Hope this helps??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
... Those numbers ya'll are throwing out there don't mean squat to me! ... so would one of you guys explain to me how those numbers can be a chord?!!! ...

 

A brave confession. Reminds me of when Krasi finally confessed to cracking the headstock on MrGibs.

 

Anyway, AnneS got it for ya.

 

Kinda similar to tab notation.

 

 

GG -

 

Interesting thread. B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, AnnS and BigKahune! Wow, that's so simple. Now I really do feel like an idiot!!! I guess learning guitar these days is a lot simpler than when I started! Back then, you either had talent and played, or you just listened and wished!!! ****WARNING (this theory is no longer reckonized in the music industry)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Larry...

 

You have just been introduced into the wonderful world of Tab.....

 

Don't stop with these chords, now go for the fingerstyle stuff. Once you get what tab is and how it works, using your ear with the music and tab, you will have a world of great music and riffs opened up to you now.

 

Enjoy your chords everyone!

 

As others have said, great thread GG!! I have been having fun playing little chord melodies all morning with my computer by my side and new chords being thrown at me! Fun stuff!!! [thumbup]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Karen,

 

Your chord (200230) is a sort of D9 too, the 1st string E being the nine. That formation was used a lot in sixties folk music with its 7 counterpart D7/9 (200210) in songs in the key of C like Peter Paul and Mary's version of "Don't Think Twice (It's All Right)" and Arlo Guthrie's "Alice's Restaurant", and you're right; it is a very distinctive chord with a formation that lends itself nicely to finger-picking styles, especially when used as a transition (passing) chord with its F# bass note on the sixth string. I agree, it is a beautiful chord indeed.

 

Keep up the good work,

Jack6849

Well, what do you know? I've been on a Peter, Paul & Mary kick for a few months now so isn't that interesting! I really should learn some theory one of these days. This month's Acoustic Guitar magazine has an article on 9th chords. I think I'll pick it up

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those open Barre chords are all over America`s Three roses track, from their classic 1970 self titled debut album.

 

steve.

Isn't that the best album? Three Roses and Riverside are probably in my top ten favourite songs EVER, and certainly my top songs of America. The ex-boyfriend can play Three Roses really well but he won't teach it to me (he has control issues :rolleyes: )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(Ah......so you do sing!)

 

My style of play tends to favor the key of E, which comes with an assortment of chords to be mangled, rather wrangled in various orders in support of a melody. I remember preferring minor keys early in my playing days but now it's the other way round. If I had to pick a favorite right now it'd be a plain ol' open C, including the bass G note.....wonderful sounding strum.

Buc, I love that C with a G bass, so full and rich-sounding. I'm using it right now to play City of Dreams by Victoria Banks. It sounds incredible on Magic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great topic!

 

Let's start:

 

032000 / 002020 / 002200 / 00440x / 006600 / 009900 / 00121200

 

006700 / 008670 / 007570 / 00645x / 00423x / 00890x

 

06500x / 08700x / 0109000 /

 

05053x / 07075x /

 

404220 / 909700 /

 

53500x / 75700x

 

Krasi, I had a great time going through these this morning. Thank you! [biggrin]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...