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Great records with horrible production?


dem00n

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The first two KISS albums (KISS and Hotter Than Hell). Great material (except for "Kissin' Time" and "Goin Blind".....), but Kenny Kerner and Richie Wise (the production team) were just as inexperienced as the band was. It's amazing, that the next release, "Dressed To Kill", was produced by Neil Bogart (the head of Casablanca Records. RIP!) and the band, and Neil was stoned the whole time, and it still managed to sound better. The worst part is the drum sound on Hotter Than Hell (especially on "Comin' Home"). Ugggghhhh.....It was that tinny 80s drum sound only a decade earlier...

 

Rush's Signals. The production was actually pretty decent, but the guitars are overpowered by the rest of the instruments. Alex Lifeson complains about that a lot!

 

Metallica's Death Magnetic....Their early albums weren't very great either, but that's true for most metal bands back then.

 

Every band has a bad sounding record production wise.

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First few Judas Priest albums.....

Wow, really?

I thought Sad Wings of Destiny and Sin After Sin has great production, SWoD has some of the best guitar tones in the whole Judas Priest discography if you ask me.

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Wow, really?

I thought Sad Wings of Destiny and Sin After Sin has great production, SWoD has some of the best guitar tones in the whole Judas Priest discography if you ask me.

 

My favourite JP production is the "live" Unleashed in the East album - (which spent a long time being tweaked before release) which more or less dates from the period I first saw them in concert - The songs from the early studio albums really come to life on that album - they seem heavier and they just breathe a bit more freely in my opinion - but I'm glad you love the old Priest. I was the only kid in junior school (i.e. under 11 yo) who liked them - everyone thought I was deranged.....

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Yeh. I'd Snatch it up. for $35 bucks especially if its the real deal from 82.

 

Even with the muddy production, that album became the bridge between Punk & Thrash & Metal and thusly... a Bible of sorts.

 

That LP, warts & all, is a modern classic.

 

 

There's an original pressing for sale here locally at my buddies shop, I've been tempted to buy it for months now. I just can't justify the $35 for it.

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Yeh. I'd Snatch it up. for $35 bucks especially if its the real deal from 82.

 

Even with the muddy production, that album became the bridge between Punk & Thrash & Metal and thusly... a Bible of sorts.

 

That LP, warts & all, is a modern classic.

 

The record is very clean, however the jacket is a bit worn. That record is unreal, definitely a must.

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Too many to name, but the top two that come to mind are The Smiths' debut album. Too tinny. And the early My Bloody Valentine e.p.s like You Made Me Realise and Feed Me with Your Kiss. Tinny as well. The snare drum sounds like tissue paper.

 

The early nineties was a pretty bad era for production. A lot of rock albums were bathed in light digital reverb. Makes for a mushy mix. A prime example is Pearl Jam's Ten.

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Mando Diao: Give Me Fire :angry:

 

Great music, great recording, but this is audible only during soft passages and song endings. This album was mastered beyond any acceptable limits and limiter settings. [thumbdn]

 

The loudness war is my # 1 reason to buy next to no CDs anymore. There never was a time I believe when so much great music was intentionally destroyed by any technical process as they do applying nowadays maximizing procedures. [cursing]

 

Talking about Deep Purple In Rock: the entire album must have been recorded with heavy overload of the tracks. Tape overload was used for style later e. g. by Frank Zappa on the title track of his Apostrophe (') album. Therefore the contrast to the following clean sounding track Uncle Remus is rather striking.

 

By the way, I prefer a clean and dynamic sound. Sadly, e. g. several Joe Jackson albums were significantly deteriorated through remastering years after their first release.

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Too many to name, but the top two that come to mind are The Smiths' debut album. Too tinny. And the early My Bloody Valentine e.p.s like You Made Me Realise and Feed Me with Your Kiss. Tinny as well. The snare drum sounds like tissue paper.

 

The early nineties was a pretty bad era for production. A lot of rock albums were bathed in light digital reverb. Makes for a mushy mix. A prime example is Pearl Jam's Ten.

 

I actually liked the sound of Ten!

 

 

 

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Deep Purple, In Rock comes in mind...

 

I can't imagine In Rock sounding any better. The sound quality lends itself to classics like Bloodsucker and Flight Of The Rat. It seems as the later cuts in the album get a little iffy though.

 

...meanwhile...I hate the sound of GnRs albums and Faith No More's Epic. Not enough bottom end.

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...meanwhile...I hate the sound of GnRs albums and Faith No More's Epic. Not enough bottom end.

 

Yes! That was the era of clickity-clackity bass. Go on YouTube and listen to the bass tracks from Megadeth's Rust In Peace. Talk about clickity-clackity.

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