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Lars68

Lost gems - songs that deserve to go down in history

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When I think about truly great songs that have been forgotten by the passing of time that should be up there among the classics, still being played today, this song is at the top of my list. What a masterpiece of a song, one that mixes Springsteen quality lyrics with British rock and roll. To me this is Sweet Home Alabama classic standard and beyond...

 

What is your top lost gem?

Lars

Edited by Lars68
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Nice, Lars. I'm going to find it on Tidal. I suspect the song had some of it's ebb and flow squeezed out of it.

I've got two entries. The first is a song that was popular and not lost, but I do feel it never got the accolades it should have. Very tough subject to boot. One of those songs that I wish I had written, but wish never had to be written to begin with.  It's tragic to the nth degree.

 

The second is one of those Blues acts who got "discovered" way too late in life, but we still have a decent sized catalogue to work with. My favorite version of Rolling and Tumbling Blues with his grandson on drums and his one-time neighbor and, as he says, "white son" on guitar.

 

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Anything Pearls Before Swine did, re:  Use of Ashes, Rocket Man, Marjorie.     And then there is always, Drunk Again by P.B. & The Butterfield Blues Band!

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22 hours ago, Buke said:

one that I think of often and have put in my repertoire is Get Together by the Youngbloods

 

 If there is a Jessie Colin Young song (he, of course, did not pen Get Together)  that is a true gem my vote goes for "Darkness Darkness"

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I once crawled down a rabbit hole of noted "b-sides" and was amazed that Sam Cooke's A Change Is gonna Come is a B-side to Shake....

Anyways that made me think of Bring It On Home To Me... which I hope is a song that never gets lost no matter the generation.

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While street buskin' plus/minus 40 years ago a guy came over and asked if he could play my guitar. 

I handed it to him and got this one back. No doubt whatsoever - he delivered a pearl. Went straight home and bought the record. Obviously even better. 

Haven't heard it in a looong time. This was the lucky opportunity.

 

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5 hours ago, Salfromchatham said:

I once crawled down a rabbit hole of noted "b-sides" and was amazed that Sam Cooke's A Change Is gonna Come is a B-side to Shake....

Anyways that made me think of Bring It On Home To Me... which I hope is a song that never gets lost no matter the generation.

Sam Cooke and Lou Rawls. Can’t go wrong. 

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8 hours ago, zombywoof said:

 

 If there is a Jessie Colin Young song (he, of course, did not pen Get Together)  that is a true gem my vote goes for "Darkness Darkness"

But the Youngbloods version of Get Together is still pretty definitive.

Darkness Darkness may be the best song JCY has written.

Virtually everything off Soul of a City Boy , although I think most were covers, had an impact on me. Four in the Morning may have been my first playing attempt at an entire genre, after starting out in the PP&M school in high school and moving on to traditional ballads in my first two years of college.

You gotta keep moving ahead to get anywhere. "Life is change, how it differs from the rocks..."

Edited by j45nick
additional thought

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On 2/22/2020 at 11:01 AM, Hall said:

Anything Pearls Before Swine did, re:  Use of Ashes, Rocket Man, Marjorie.     And then there is always, Drunk Again by P.B. & The Butterfield Blues Band!

 

Good choices!

The first time I heard Pearls Before Swine was on the Bob Fass show on WBAI radio in I think 1967.  I went out the next day and bought their first LP.    I went on to buy every following LP as well as Tom Rapp's (RIP) solo LPs. 

In the mid-1960s I could not get enough of the Blues Project and Butterfield Blues Band.  I could never understand what all the hoopla about Clapton, Page and Beck was when we had Danny Kalb and Mike Bloomfield.   When it comes to Butterfield my favorite LP remains a boot which has the full 1965 Butterfield Newport set as well as the Dylan electric set which they backed him on.

Edited by zombywoof

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Some great choices here - R.L who if you were real lucky you could see playing on his porch on your way to Junior's Place and  Graham Parker who in a prefect world would have sold more LPs than Springsteen 

But for my money,  if there is a song that belongs on the Mount Rushmore of tunes this be it.   I have been a big fan since Fairport Convention.

 

 

 

Edited by zombywoof
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5 hours ago, zombywoof said:

Some great choices here - R.L who if you were real lucky you could see playing on his porch on your way to Junior's Place and  Graham Parker who in a prefect world would have sold more LPs than Springsteen 

But for my money,  if there is a song that belongs on the Mount Rushmore of tunes this be it.   I have been a big fan since Fairport Convention.

 

 

 

Yes, you're right on  1952 V B L!

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I got to thinking a little more on this topic and realized I have a soft spot in my heart for Steve Miller's SEASONS and Family's My Friend The Sun.    I still do both these songs to this very day so they must have reached me deeply way back when.

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5 minutes ago, Hall said:

 have a soft spot in my heart for Steve Miller's SEASONS , , , 

Ouh, , , got the record but haven't heard in a long time. Very groovii tune with tons of atmosphere. . 

 

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I last 6 seconds on You Tube with that one. Had to go to Tidal to listen (or anything but the 'tube)

Sheeesh!!!  Did you see who produced that? Glyn Johns? Dang! That's some serious pedigree. The music world is more tightly related than most barn cats.

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2 hours ago, PatriotsBiker said:

 The music world is more tightly related than most barn cats.

Probably connected via McCartney - well a guess. Back then the beat circles were very narrow.  The tripe/trip didn't count many indians. . 

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On 2/23/2020 at 2:10 PM, E-minor7 said:

While street buskin' plus/minus 40 years ago a guy came over and asked if he could play my guitar. 

I handed it to him and got this one back. No doubt whatsoever - he delivered a pearl. Went straight home and bought the record. Obviously even better. 

Haven't heard it in a looong time. This was the lucky opportunity.

 

Don't bother with the local girls. Don't bother with them, they don't bother me. Love that album.

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3 minutes ago, Sgt. Pepper said:

Don't bother with the local girls. Don't bother with them, they don't bother me. Love that album.

Okay - admit not being able to remember it in detail, which would change if I gave it a spin.  Not sure it'll happen. But that song'n'performance stay sublime. 

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2 minutes ago, E-minor7 said:

Okay - admit not being able to remember it in detail, which would change if I gave it a spin.  Not sure it'll happen. But that song'n'performance stay sublime. 

He was one of those angry kind of new wavers like Elvis Costello and Joe Jackson when they started out.

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33 minutes ago, Sgt. Pepper said:

He was one of those angry kind of new wavers like Elvis Costello and Joe Jackson when they started out.

Exactly - fresh raving men.  In uncontrolled doses too frustrated for me.  Good however - and probably necessary at the time. 

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A cover of CCR's "Long as I Can See the Light" by Ted Hawkins.

 

An interesting enough character in music history. From what I understand, he was a long time street performer in Venice Beach who played an open tuning guitar with a leather glove on his fret hand.  

And this one. Stan Webb and his Chicken Shack doing "Last Night I Lost the Best Friend I Ever Had". If you like over-driven Les Paul Tone, but can't sit through10-15 minutes of Blues, fast forward a bit and find his solos. Magnificent tone in it's rawness and imperfections, IMHO.    This is one of those Blues classic rhythm and progressions that one can go from this song to "Somebody Load Me A Dime" to an alternate tuning of "Since I've Been Loving You" and play for an hour before you think 15 minutes has passed.....even considering how bad I am at this. Anyhow.....

 

(btw - another music world tied at the hip moment - there two covers of "I'd Rather Go Blind" by this band. One version features the future Fleetwood Mac star, Christine McVie. )

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